#1
Hey all

Been playing about a year and a half. I'm trying to increase my speed. I know forcing it is bad, and I notice without making a conscious effort things like chord progressions and scales go faster. So here is my question, does speed naturally increase at it's own pace? Should I just enjoy the focus but not straining focus needed to play properly?

In other words, will playing faster just happen and right now I should just focus in getting technical aspects right and let the speed increase come when my speed increase comes?


Thanks
Washburn MG-44(E)
Ibanez RG421 (Eb)
Art & Lutherie Electric Cutaway
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MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
Last edited by Shadowofravenwo at Mar 3, 2013,
#3
But that spoke volumes my friend.

Thanks
Washburn MG-44(E)
Ibanez RG421 (Eb)
Art & Lutherie Electric Cutaway
Vox Valvetronix VT40
Vox AC4tv 1x10
Vox Original Wah-Wah Pedal V847-A
MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
#4
It does.

What more people should understand is that focusing on playing well at a slower tempo benefits you more. Like instead of chasing speed with playing your scales up and down you should just go through your scales at a nice slow tempo where you feel that you can play them relaxed and accurately. Speed will come by itself when your ready for it, you just have to practice well.
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#5
So if I tense up or I feel like I'm forcing it mentally, I'm not relaxed. So it shouldn't be a mental strain either if I understand you correctly.
Washburn MG-44(E)
Ibanez RG421 (Eb)
Art & Lutherie Electric Cutaway
Vox Valvetronix VT40
Vox AC4tv 1x10
Vox Original Wah-Wah Pedal V847-A
MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
#6
It's simple. Like learning to read or any other thing. When you're learning you must go slow and learn letter by letter until you learn to read the whole word right. Later as it goes you learn to read whole sentence, row, page, book etc in no time. Such is the deal with guitar playing. When you learn it slow, but good, you can incrase your speed to whatever you want.
Sorry for bad english tho, I'm not native speaker and it's late Hope it helped!
#7
That was perfect Turtleboy. I'm a teacher so I totally got the analogy. My concern was because I didn't know what I was doing wrong before I got a teacher, I had to play super slow 35 bpm in some cases. I was worried that I has stuck at that speed, and had to push myself to get faster.
Washburn MG-44(E)
Ibanez RG421 (Eb)
Art & Lutherie Electric Cutaway
Vox Valvetronix VT40
Vox AC4tv 1x10
Vox Original Wah-Wah Pedal V847-A
MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
#8
Yep, just don't worry about speed. Practise sounding good and feeling relaxed and the speed will come.

Sorry for bad english tho, I'm not native speaker and it's late.


Sounded fine to me.
#9
Totally speed is for the birds. Take your time and play it correctly. Chicks dig the fast stuff but they also want to hear the soul notes! Its time and repitition. Once you feel comfortable and relaxed the speed will follow.

Shoot at 1 1/2 years i was on Metallica's catalog screaming at my hands to move! Now i can play any f there songs at any speed. And that came from playing it over and over and over.
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#10
When I first started, I wanted to get fast immediately, but that's cause I started so slow it was insulting (doesn't everyone?)
But now I'm about a year in, I just want to play sexier and cleaner, I've noticed speed came without me even focusing on it. And at random times when I solo I'll bust out a fast little lick and it's pretty cool.
We're around the same experience, but I definitely think speed will come naturally brutha man! Keep playing!
#11
Thanks guys. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't in a rut that I would have to force myself out of. Maybe that's a huge disadvantage to metronomes. You get too fixated on numbers.
Washburn MG-44(E)
Ibanez RG421 (Eb)
Art & Lutherie Electric Cutaway
Vox Valvetronix VT40
Vox AC4tv 1x10
Vox Original Wah-Wah Pedal V847-A
MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
#12
I noticed I am taking my finger far from the strings when changing or what have you. Should I focus on that? Or is that something that will correct naturally?

Cheers
Washburn MG-44(E)
Ibanez RG421 (Eb)
Art & Lutherie Electric Cutaway
Vox Valvetronix VT40
Vox AC4tv 1x10
Vox Original Wah-Wah Pedal V847-A
MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
#14
Quote by Shadowofravenwo
I noticed I am taking my finger far from the strings when changing or what have you. Should I focus on that? Or is that something that will correct naturally?

Cheers


Yes, it is true that a certain amount of speed will come naturally, but this does not mean that attempting fast speeds doesn't have it's place.

Sometimes, when you attempt to speed up, you start to make mistakes. This is both good and bad. You don't want to continually practise fast (because then you practise making mistakes), but also, when you make these mistakes they can help you to improve your technique (by showing where your mistakes are).

So, yes, slow practise is worth more- and you should spend more time on it- but fast speeds can show you where you're going wrong, sometimes. Then you should go back and improve your technique at slower speeds, to get rid of the mistakes.

I hope that makes sense.
#15
Quote by Freepower
To a certain degree it will correct naturally, however it's a very good idea to work on it as it will improve every aspect of your playing. Take a look at this -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvhZ80OsuTQ




That did help, thanks.
Washburn MG-44(E)
Ibanez RG421 (Eb)
Art & Lutherie Electric Cutaway
Vox Valvetronix VT40
Vox AC4tv 1x10
Vox Original Wah-Wah Pedal V847-A
MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
#16
I took a page from the great book of Dime and ran with it on finger placement over strings. I was like you had a pretty big gap between finger and string when moving around chords or single notes. I read that he just barely hovered over the strings so he wouldnt get string noise. But it also helped with akward hand positioning. So for me it took a little practice and then it just became second nature.
The Rig of Joy:
Stiff Amplification Dirthead 20w
Bugera 2x12 Cab
Fender Partscaster Korean Made
Epiphone Prophecy
Washburn Southern Cross 34 of 100
Ibanez TS9,AD9,GCB95, Multi Chorus and TU2
#17
I used the book "Terrifying Technique" to build up speed and technique...it has a lot of practice riffs, helped me out quite a bit, especially with alternate picking.
#18
I think technique is how you get really fast. Also if your not plugged in, you won't get same effect.

I mean with distorion, I can tap and legato at ten times faster rate than I can alternate pick with normal fingering.
#20
The video doesn't work Freepower, maybe try to re-upload it ... or I don't know ^^'
I want to see it ! :P

Edit : Now, it's working ... I didn't understand, sorry ^^
"Sans la musique, la vie serait une erreur" Nietzsche
Last edited by Syndromed at Mar 7, 2013,
#22
This video is very helpful, thank you to take the time to make video like that.
"Sans la musique, la vie serait une erreur" Nietzsche
#24
i have been playing for less than a year and my speed was greatly helped by using a metronome for a few days on random licks i was learning at the time. it pushed my overall speed up from a flailing randomness of inconsistency to a moderately fast controlled expression.
#25
1) Refine your technique, ie make smaller movements. The video link is a good approach and yes it must be done very slowly. Go too fast and the autopilot will take over.

2) Refine your timing and therefore synchronise your hands. To do this try to play each of the following subdivisions at say 60bpm:

8th notes
8th note triplets
16th notes
Quintuplets (if you want a bigger challenge)
16th note triples
Septuplets (if you want a bigger challenge)
32nd notes
Nonuplets (if you want a bigger challenge)

Do it all on a single fretted note focussing 100% on viciously accurate timing. Start with just one of the above played constantly, then when you've got a few of them nice and accurate, try switching between then, say a bar of 8th note triplets then a bar of 8th notes. There must be no lag or 'adjustment time' when you switch.

You can then up this to one beat of each subdivision, and so on.

I hope that helps.
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#26
Its always more impressive if you can play a song 100% accurately through to the end, exactly as the music asks for, compared to someone who never uses a meternome or song book, and can slaughter through the song at twice the speed as you, but doesn't do all the same timings cause they are only going for speed without doing what the music sheet asks for.

Only exception in my book,
Trying to break record: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DMyM7ARJUI

or

Trying to get laid by trying to look cool in front of girls
#27
Of course if your this guy, your doing the song 100% correctly(i guess I can't tell its too fast), so he easily broke a record, and probably got laid for it. But is the faster ones any more impressive than doing what the music wants?

I mean it is as far as records go, but if I walked into GC, I would rather here him play at normal speed...except this song is meant to try and be slaughtered through, at least he keeps up with the beat, like some people who go faster.
Last edited by RyanStorm13 at Mar 7, 2013,