Leat
UG Freak
Join date: May 2007
1,369 IQ
#1
not sure where to put this thread, but it has to do with my acoustic guitar I'm trying to fix.

I have an ibanez 3/4 size acoustic. the problem is if I play a G it has a very slight wobble to the sound, and when I play an E open, the b and high e sound flat. but on the fret board they sound ok.
just took it to a shop and the guy frigging twisted my truss rod back and forth, ended up selling me a pack of strings. so now I turn to you forum, please help.
I got some good guitars, yo.
coldandhomeless
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2013
123 IQ
#2
theres many ways to do this, but i always use a tuner, always! tune each string individually, and then hit the 12th fret harmonic. then fret the 12th fret. u have to GENTLY push strait down though. if the note is sharp of the harmonic, the bridge is too close to the neck. if its flat, the bridge is too far away from the neck. with it being an acoustic, there aint a whole hell of alot you can do besides taking off the bridge piece (the bone or plastic) and shave it to a point in the direction it needs to go relative to where the string rests over it already. that, or temper your tuning. usually 3/4 acoustics have the lower notes slightly flat when tuned open(because of this problem.) i dont know what else to tell u.
Lavatain
5150 III Enthusiast
Join date: May 2008
1,229 IQ
#3
You have a 3/4 size acoustic. It's not gonna play perfect, or well for that matter. They're not built to last, so I wouldn't try getting too technical on it.
Leat
UG Freak
Join date: May 2007
1,369 IQ
#4
Well it was only a 40 dollar guitar, so it is what it is. I just like the 3/4 size cause I'm a small dude, makes the playing easier. Oh well.
I got some good guitars, yo.
Leat
UG Freak
Join date: May 2007
1,369 IQ
#5
UPDATE: !!!! a QUICK FIX was to simply put my capo on the second fret, tune down so that the Capo'd Second Fret was Standard Tuning. Plays like a boss.

WTF you know? I lost 2 frets, but I'm a singer/songwriter these days so it's not like I'm going to be soloing all the way up the fretboard, just not my style.
I got some good guitars, yo.
RebuildIt
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2011
254 IQ
#6
Quote by Leat
UPDATE: !!!! a QUICK FIX was to simply put my capo on the second fret, tune down so that the Capo'd Second Fret was Standard Tuning. Plays like a boss.

WTF you know? I lost 2 frets, but I'm a singer/songwriter these days so it's not like I'm going to be soloing all the way up the fretboard, just not my style.


If that fixes it, you might want to check your nut position and action. Often cheap guitars are shipped with too much clearance, forcing extra string bending to fret, which in turn throws off the intonation. They do this so that the guitar still works as the nut wears out, assuming people too cheap to buy an expensive guitar will not know that nuts can be replaced.

Its pretty easy to tell when a nut needs work. Check its action and see if it is way higher than the action you get with the capo. If the nut action is too high, your first note will be sharp because of the extra string tension. This stretching is less noticable as you get further from the over-height nut.