The Swede Dude
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
45 IQ
#1
Hi! As the title says, I would really like to know how to be more creative when it comes to rhythm. So feel free to share all you're tips and secrets.
LightxGrenade
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2008
1,140 IQ
#2
Rhythms get interesting when you start accenting different beats. Like accenting an upstroke or in particular accenting the "weaker" beats (like the 2nd and 4th beat in 4/4 time). In a lot of modern metal (djent), there's an emphasis on "anticipating" the beat (ex if you're playing eighth notes such as 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and...you would stress the "and" after the 4th to kind of "anticipate" the 1st beat. Accenting different beats, and anticipating is all part of something called Syncopation. I'm sure if you go on youtube you'll find tons of stuff on it.
Another thing is polyrhythms, I'm just now getting a grasp on this and I wouldn't feel right to give you advice on that like I'm some expert but here's a video that does a simple polyrhythm and is explained pretty clearly.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQDQNDZohRs
Gibson LP Studio
Taylor 518E
Washburn WD15SCE acoustic electric
Carvin DC727 (ordered! The wait is driving me nuts!)
TheHydra
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2011
421 IQ
#3
Listen to music that you find to have creative rhythm (whatever that entails) and figure out what they're doing.
antisun
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
1,263 IQ
#4
I'm no expert here, but something i find sounds cool is if you're playing a chord/power chord that's the root of the scale you're playing over top of, when the pitch of your lead notes go down, make the power chords go up and vice versa, hopefully that makes sense. For example, if you're hit an A on your lead, then go on up to an E, start with a higher A PC and then drop down to a lower E PC.
ouchies
UG's OG
Join date: Jan 2006
1,613 IQ
#5
Quote by LightxGrenade
Rhythms get interesting when you start accenting different beats. Like accenting an upstroke or in particular accenting the "weaker" beats (like the 2nd and 4th beat in 4/4 time). In a lot of modern metal (djent), there's an emphasis on "anticipating" the beat (ex if you're playing eighth notes such as 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and...you would stress the "and" after the 4th to kind of "anticipate" the 1st beat. Accenting different beats, and anticipating is all part of something called Syncopation. I'm sure if you go on youtube you'll find tons of stuff on it.
Another thing is polyrhythms, I'm just now getting a grasp on this and I wouldn't feel right to give you advice on that like I'm some expert but here's a video that does a simple polyrhythm and is explained pretty clearly.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQDQNDZohRs


god that sounded terrible
LightxGrenade
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2008
1,140 IQ
#6
Quote by ouchies
god that sounded terrible

it's not meant to sound awesome its meant to be a simple tutorial. Why does everything have to ****ing sound amazing when you're just trying to get a concept across? Instead of criticizing, how about you offer some advice as well instead of just dropping in to criticize then leaving without saying anything else like a typical douche?
Gibson LP Studio
Taylor 518E
Washburn WD15SCE acoustic electric
Carvin DC727 (ordered! The wait is driving me nuts!)
Emster 23
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2013
55 IQ
#8
I would suggest listening to music that is about as far from what you usually listen to as possible. There is lots of interesting ways to chop up time as far as music goes. Step outside the box, then drag some interesting scraps back in with you. I developed a love of Balinese gamelan, for instance. Lived there and visited for a long time. Only 5 notes in scale, so rhythm big deal. Here's a random one I pulled off youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEsfevRfjCI
Chipie7896
Registered User
Join date: May 2012
10 IQ
#9
Quote by ouchies
Calm down no need to get your panties in a bunch. I recommend practicing practicing exercises that actually sound musical. Happy?

Very useful information
The Swede Dude
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
45 IQ
#10
Quote by LightxGrenade
Rhythms get interesting when you start accenting different beats. Like accenting an upstroke or in particular accenting the "weaker" beats (like the 2nd and 4th beat in 4/4 time). In a lot of modern metal (djent), there's an emphasis on "anticipating" the beat (ex if you're playing eighth notes such as 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and...you would stress the "and" after the 4th to kind of "anticipate" the 1st beat. Accenting different beats, and anticipating is all part of something called Syncopation. I'm sure if you go on youtube you'll find tons of stuff on it.
Another thing is polyrhythms, I'm just now getting a grasp on this and I wouldn't feel right to give you advice on that like I'm some expert but here's a video that does a simple polyrhythm and is explained pretty clearly.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQDQNDZohRs


This was a bit to much theory for me. But I'm quite sure that I picked up something from it.
lspell960
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2010
10 IQ
#11
What kind of music do you play? I feel like that might shape advice differently, for I have no love of metal so speaking in djent or what have you would not interest me.

I suggest listening to funk
The Swede Dude
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
45 IQ
#12
Quote by lspell960
What kind of music do you play? I feel like that might shape advice differently, for I have no love of metal so speaking in djent or what have you would not interest me.

I suggest listening to funk



Sorry to disappoint you , but I just love metal! But I'm still quite open minded when it comes to music. I would still like to avoid things as Funk or Jazz, but I would love if you could suggest me any folk music or classical pieces.
Tempoe
. . . ∆ . . .
Join date: Oct 2008
2,516 IQ
#13
Learn a bit of percussion. It will do wonders
The Swede Dude
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
45 IQ
#14
Quote by Emster 23
I would suggest listening to music that is about as far from what you usually listen to as possible. There is lots of interesting ways to chop up time as far as music goes. Step outside the box, then drag some interesting scraps back in with you. I developed a love of Balinese gamelan, for instance. Lived there and visited for a long time. Only 5 notes in scale, so rhythm big deal. Here's a random one I pulled off youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEsfevRfjCI


Well I tend to like a lot of musical stuff coming from the eastern part of the world, but I would rather like if you could show me a more personal choice. Instead of just a random video. But I like the way you think!
The Swede Dude
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
45 IQ
#15
Quote by Tempoe
Learn a bit of percussion. It will do wonders


What exactly is "percussion"? My theory is quite limited when it comes to rhythm
bigblockelectra
Registered User
Join date: Nov 2007
572 IQ
#16
Percussion instruments like drums, xylophones, bongos, the triangle. Some are "tuned" in that they have a reference pitch, like an A or C# or whatever. Others just sound like noise, like a crash symbol.
Emster 23
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2013
55 IQ
#17
Quote by The Swede Dude
Well I tend to like a lot of musical stuff coming from the eastern part of the world, but I would rather like if you could show me a more personal choice. Instead of just a random video. But I like the way you think!

I used to live in Ubud, saw that group many times, along with tons of others. I grabbed a quick one just as a sampler. If someone liked it they could go look for more. My more personal choice would be videos I shot of Balinese dance and music. I got into shooting videos of it back in 83 because most tv shows shots looked crappy to me & thought I could do better.
I have good friend over there plays this bamboo stuff too. We worked out X Files theme once for fun. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KS6v-f2rqgM
The Swede Dude
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
45 IQ
#18
Quote by bigblockelectra
Percussion instruments like drums, xylophones, bongos, the triangle. Some are "tuned" in that they have a reference pitch, like an A or C# or whatever. Others just sound like noise, like a crash symbol.

I really feel dumb for not figuring it out.
So I think I'll be signing up for a couple of drumming lessons.
The Swede Dude
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
45 IQ
#19
Quote by Emster 23
I used to live in Ubud, saw that group many times, along with tons of others. I grabbed a quick one just as a sampler. If someone liked it they could go look for more. My more personal choice would be videos I shot of Balinese dance and music. I got into shooting videos of it back in 83 because most tv shows shots looked crappy to me & thought I could do better.
I have good friend over there plays this bamboo stuff too. We worked out X Files theme once for fun. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KS6v-f2rqgM


This one sounds better and more interesting. Thank you and everyone else for your efforts!