#1
So i set my guitar up for C standard, decided to tune it up to E std today and obviously had to tighten the truss rod, if i put it back in C, i will of course, loosen it back, and i have a habit of changing up tunings. Any harm in this?
#2
I don't think it's a great idea to have the wood flexing all the time like that. Plus there are possible issues with the adjustment nut if you're constantly adjusting it. I think really, you're just better off getting another guitar if you want to do this a lot. You're going to save yourself a lot of time in the long run.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#4
I don't see how it could do any serious damage. When you dive bomb and pull up on a guitar with a floyd rose, you are adding and releasing many pounds of pressure on and off the neck very rapidly. And yet guitars with floyds don't seem to have a problem with it.
Quote by Axelfox
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#5
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
I don't see how it could do any serious damage. When you dive bomb and pull up on a guitar with a floyd rose, you are adding and releasing many pounds of pressure on and off the neck very rapidly. And yet guitars with floyds don't seem to have a problem with it.


that was my thinking, i mean, its not like i'm really leaving the change in tension there, as soon as i tune up/down just give it a turn and thats that. i keep the same amount of relief regardless of the tuning.

The neck on my guitar also seems pretty stiff, i'm using 13-62 gauge strings and the truss rod isn't even completely tightened in order to get the correct amount of relief. tuning it it up from C, the relief only changed very slightly and a 1/4 turn is all it took to get it back where it was.
Last edited by antisun at Mar 12, 2013,
#6
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
I don't see how it could do any serious damage. When you dive bomb and pull up on a guitar with a floyd rose, you are adding and releasing many pounds of pressure on and off the neck very rapidly. And yet guitars with floyds don't seem to have a problem with it.


That's only for a very short amount of time though. When you're adjusting the truss rod, the stresses are for a longer time.

Quote by antisun
that was my thinking, i mean, its not like i'm really leaving the change in tension there, as soon as i tune up/down just give it a turn and thats that. i keep the same amount of relief regardless of the tuning.


You're not keeping the same amount of relief between the point that you change the tuning and adjust the truss rod, though.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#7
Dude, just adjust the bridge for whatever tuning you're in. Constant adjustments on the truss rod will stress the hell out of the neck. Buy another guitar and set that up for whatever other tuning you want to play in...
#8
Quote by eddiehimself
That's only for a very short amount of time though. When you're adjusting the truss rod, the stresses are for a longer time.


You're not keeping the same amount of relief between the point that you change the tuning and adjust the truss rod, though.


Speaking from someone who has worked in / ran a shop for 10 years. He's right man its really bad for the neck
#9
Everyone will tell you something different. personally I'd say no. I was looking on the back of a packet of strings and it claims there is about 6kg/(~13lbs) of tension in every string. You should be safe.

I loosened the truss rod on one of my guitars so much that the first 5 frets were totally dead (e.g way too loose). Then I got a new guitar and didn't touch then previously mentioned guitar for about 5 months. When I finally got back to adjusting it there were no ill effects.
#10
Quote by MegadethFan18
Everyone will tell you something different. personally I'd say no. I was looking on the back of a packet of strings and it claims there is about 6kg/(~13lbs) of tension in every string. You should be safe.

I loosened the truss rod on one of my guitars so much that the first 5 frets were totally dead (e.g way too loose). Then I got a new guitar and didn't touch then previously mentioned guitar for about 5 months. When I finally got back to adjusting it there were no ill effects.


You don't understand what a truss rod does if you say "No, consistent truss rod adjustments won't harm the neck." String tension has NOTHING to with the purpose of the truss rod.
#11
I have to do small adjustments often due to huge humidity changes, only about 1/8 turn does it, but I've probably done it 30 times or more on my Prestige, no issues with the neck really. Pretty surprised the that those humidity changes wouldn't have done it some harm, but frets aren't sticking out or anything, still plays like new.
#12
Quote by Dimarzio45
" String tension has NOTHING to with the purpose of the truss rod.


U wot m8?

The truss rod is there to counteract the tension from the strings.

You don't understand Sir. But thanks to me now you do.
#13
Quote by MegadethFan18
U wot m8?

The truss rod is there to counteract the tension from the strings.

You don't understand Sir. But thanks to me now you do.


Yeah...bending a piece of wood back and forth doesn't hurt its strength at all (Sarcasm)....
#14
In short, antisun, any experienced guitar tech will tell you that adjusting the truss rod is a last resort effort towards improving the action. If you want to make adjustments, look at the bridge setup first.

The best way to solve this issue without having to constantly make adjustments every time you change tuning, is to get a guitar specific for that tuning. Namely, the lower tuning since most guitars are, by default, setup to be tuned in E.

Years ago, I destroyed a guitar due to multiple BACK AND FORTH adjustments. Even if they were small adjustments, the damage was irreversible in the end.

It's one thing if you want to make a small change and NOT mess with it. But, before you do that, make adjustments with the bridge height. You may have to adjust the saddles to readjust the intonation, too.

Plus, constant tweaking back and forth with wood will cause the wood grain to loosen which will effect sound. It may be a small effect but, nevertheless, everything counts.

But, hey, it's your guitar. Do what you want. You're the one who asked. Would I do it? Absolutely not. Only until I've exhausted my efforts with the bridge solution will I begin to think about adjusting the truss rod. Doing it constantly for a change in tunings is just OVERKILL on the neck's strength. Maybe you should find an in-between setting. But, then you wouldn't fully win with either tuning.
Last edited by Dimarzio45 at Mar 12, 2013,
#15
Quote by Dimarzio45
In short, antisun, any experienced guitar tech will tell you that adjusting the truss rod is a last resort effort towards improving the action. If you want to make adjustments, look at the bridge setup first.

Action is a combination of neck relief, nut slot height, and bridge height. I don't understand how you can say to adjust the action only using the bridge, when the first step in setting up a guitar is to set the neck relief. If the neck relief is off, then adjusting the bridge to compensate is a wrong.

I'm not saying he should only use his truss rod to adjust his action....I am saying that the neck relief should be set before adjusting the bridge, otherwise the ideal setup will not be achieved.

And I'm also not saying he should do it frequently. It's hard to imagine small truss rod adjustments damaging a well made guitar, but I'm not particularly familiar with what will happen, so I'll advise against it as a precautionary measure.
#16
Quote by W4RP1G
Action is a combination of neck relief, nut slot height, and bridge height. I don't understand how you can say to adjust the action only using the bridge, when the first step in setting up a guitar is to set the neck relief. If the neck relief is off, then adjusting the bridge to compensate is a wrong.

I'm not saying he should only use his truss rod to adjust his action....I am saying that the neck relief should be set before adjusting the bridge, otherwise the ideal setup will not be achieved.

And I'm also not saying he should do it frequently. It's hard to imagine small truss rod adjustments damaging a well made guitar, but I'm not particularly familiar with what will happen, so I'll advise against it as a precautionary measure.


I see exactly what you're saying, W4RP1G. I was more referring to a guitar that has already been setup properly from the factory. That, and the assumption that the guitar is not a cheapy and a complete waste of time to begin with lol. I really think that, in general, this is the kind of issue that can only be accurately diagnosed by seeing the guitar in person. Because, your solution, and mine, are both accurate but, more guitar-specific.

Let's also remember, he's talking about adjusting the truss rod every time he changes tunings. If you're like me, I change back and forth between tunings practically every other day. That would be hell on a neck (and body if we're talking acoustics- don't want that belly bubble lol).

I definitely don't disagree with you though. Like I said, It's a guitar specific situation. Could be the truss rod, the nut, the bridge or a little of all of the above....assuming it was poorly setup from the factory. In that case, you get what you pay for....as much as I hate that saying sometimes...lol
Last edited by Dimarzio45 at Mar 13, 2013,
#17
Set up from the factory means nothing if it was made somewhere else. Humidity and temp changes effect the relief more than anything

A guitar setup in the factory, with perfect temp and humidity, shipped to Canada in winter (dry) would need a different adj than one sent to me in the tropics (humid as hell). Both would need an adj for sure though.
Last edited by Tempoe at Mar 13, 2013,
#18
I think the obvious answer here is that if you keep on using the trussrod in this manner you have a good chance of damaging your guitar, it's all wear and tear and essencially you're accelerating the process.

If you're changing tunings on a regular basis then I would not bother changing the truss rod, it isn't going to make some massive difference, ideally you want another guitar. I have 2 of my guitars setup for Drop C tuning, 2 setup for Standard tuning and they stay that way, for good reason!
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#19
I wouldn't adjust it every time you change tuning but every time you change strings or if you plan on leaving it in a tuning for a couple weeks you should be good. If you're going to be doing this often make very small adjustments or try and find a happy medium between both adjustments.

Be careful not to strip the allen wrenches or the adjusting nuts.
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#20
Yes. Danger of compromising the neck and of stripping the truss rod is present.
Gear:
Jackson Dinky (JB+59) > TC Polytune Noir > TS808 clone > DOD 250 > Modded RAT > CH-1 > GE-7 > TC Flashback > Plexi Clone
#21
Quote by Dimarzio45
I see exactly what you're saying, W4RP1G. I was more referring to a guitar that has already been setup properly from the factory. That, and the assumption that the guitar is not a cheapy and a complete waste of time to begin with lol. I really think that, in general, this is the kind of issue that can only be accurately diagnosed by seeing the guitar in person. Because, your solution, and mine, are both accurate but, more guitar-specific.

Let's also remember, he's talking about adjusting the truss rod every time he changes tunings. If you're like me, I change back and forth between tunings practically every other day. That would be hell on a neck (and body if we're talking acoustics- don't want that belly bubble lol).

I definitely don't disagree with you though. Like I said, It's a guitar specific situation. Could be the truss rod, the nut, the bridge or a little of all of the above....assuming it was poorly setup from the factory. In that case, you get what you pay for....as much as I hate that saying sometimes...lol


If wood was as fragile as you think it is they wouldn't use it to build houses.

Sorry fat friend you've been round twice already this year, your 300lbs of pressure is putting too much strain on my house. I need to give it time to settle, I'll see you once in 2015.
#22
Quote by MegadethFan18
If wood was as fragile as you think it is they wouldn't use it to build houses.

Sorry fat friend you've been round twice already this year, your 300lbs of pressure is putting too much strain on my house. I need to give it time to settle, I'll see you once in 2015.


That's SUCH an invalid comparison. A house is constructed of MANY different support designs. A guitar neck is A piece of wood with a rod in it. HUGE difference. I guess you've never constructed a house.

I'm done with this thread. The answers have been provided and you've proven that you haven't thoroughly read Antisun's ACTUAL question that began this thread.
#23
Quote by MegadethFan18
If wood was as fragile as you think it is they wouldn't use it to build houses.

Sorry fat friend you've been round twice already this year, your 300lbs of pressure is putting too much strain on my house. I need to give it time to settle, I'll see you once in 2015.


Dude, seriously. Just no.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#25
Quote by thehikingdude
I moved the tone knob on my guitar. Should I adjust the truss rod?

yes, leaving the tone knob changed for any amount of time without giving the truss rod at least 5 full turns will cause your neck to warp.
#26
Quote by antisun
yes, leaving the tone knob changed for any amount of time without giving the truss rod at least 5 full turns will cause your neck to warp.


You're the one who asked the question. You want to bugger up your guitar? Fine by me, see if I care.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#27
Quote by eddiehimself
You're the one who asked the question. You want to bugger up your guitar? Fine by me, see if I care.

So much hate in this thread. I'm not buggering up my guitar, the general consensus here is that adjusting the truss the way i suggested is a bad idea, therefore i'm going to refrain from doing so.
#28
Quote by antisun
So much hate in this thread. I'm not buggering up my guitar, the general consensus here is that adjusting the truss the way i suggested is a bad idea, therefore i'm going to refrain from doing so.

Excellent decision. I applaud you. So many here fall into the Adjust Your Truss Rod Trap.
Last edited by thehikingdude at Mar 16, 2013,
#29
Quote by thehikingdude
Excellent decision. I applaud you. So many here fall into the Adjust Your Truss Rod Trap.


At least 6 out of 10 guitarists have fallen into this trap and right into deep shit.
Gear:
Jackson Dinky (JB+59) > TC Polytune Noir > TS808 clone > DOD 250 > Modded RAT > CH-1 > GE-7 > TC Flashback > Plexi Clone
#30
Quote by Archer250
At least 6 out of 10 guitarists have fallen into this trap and right into deep shit.

Agreed. The biggest part of the problem as I see it is that there are a handful of people here that suggest adjusting the truss rod as the very first step to resolving a problem. I don't know if it's an effort to sound in the know or simply having no clue how much someone could fck up their guitar if they don't know what they are doing - hence my question about adjusting it if I change my tone knob.

In 41 years of playing guitar and owning dozens of guitars I have never once needed to adjust a truss rod.
Last edited by thehikingdude at Mar 17, 2013,
#31
Quote by thehikingdude
Agreed. The biggest part of the problem as I see it is that there are a handful of people here that suggest adjusting the truss rod as the very first step to resolving a problem. I don't know if it's an effort to sound in the know or simply having no clue how much someone could fck up their guitar if they don't know what they are doing - hence my question about adjusting it if I change my tone knob.

In 41 years of playing guitar and owning dozens of guitars I have never once needed to adjust a truss rod.

There isn't a luthier I know who won't start a setup by checking the truss rod. But there is a difference between checking and setting a truss rod, and using it to adjust the action. A luthier or experienced tech will set the truss rod first, and then move on to adjusting the nut and bridge height. Someone else might adjust the truss rod to change their action.

If your guitars are kept in a pretty stable climate, and you don't change your string gauge and tuning, then there's a good chance you don't need to adjust that truss rod after it's setup. But if those things aren't true, then it would be hard to imagine many guitars not needing some sort of tweaking.

I think the most important thing here is to know how to do a proper adjustment, and to not do it too frequently.
#32
Agreed. And there's also a big difference between a seasoned luthier and someone on this forum asking what to do to adjust their action. If you have to ask, then doing anything with the truss rod may not be the safest move IMO. Learning is definitely necessary, but simply experimenting without knowing how to go about it is just asking for trouble.