FirasKordi
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2012
1,192 IQ
#1
hey everyone , so ive been playing from like 1 year and 7 months ....my technique so far was good and i was satisfied by the progress untill lately (last 2-3 months) i litterly discoverd that am backing down , my sweep picking is now pretty terrible and my downpicking fatigued my hand really fast...as well as playing clean .
plz guys can you give me any advises or telling me whats going on (and nope am not trying to play faster than i did in the last year) ....and my left hand technique is pretty good and am really happy with it , the problem is with the right hand only
Last edited by FirasKordi at Mar 17, 2013,
My Last Words
Billions and billions!
Join date: Jul 2012
2,209 IQ
#2
>Analyse your technique
>Find out where your technique is lacking
>Learn how to execute proper technique in that area

If you're not familiar with correct technique, feel free to ask.
baab
TheNameOfNoone
Buckethead's Right Hand
Join date: Mar 2011
2,144 IQ
#3
I have stopped practicing my Hetfield-style downpicking and I have slowed down significantly since 2012. I simply found no use for it, and started practicing some other techniques.

It's completely natural, a skill must be practiced regularly in order not to back down.
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Archer250
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2012
569 IQ
#4
I didn't practice alternate picking and sweep picking in favor of legato for 5 days; it took me 2 days of constant practice to get back to where I was with sweep picking. My alternate picking never quite recovered...

Your skill is like a knife: unless sharpen regularly, it will dull.
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robertwilliam9
Registered User
Join date: May 2012
324 IQ
#5
I'd say that ups and downs in your ability is pretty normal. It really takes more like 4 or 5 years before you start to settle into your own style and comfort zones.

One question I think you should be trying to answer at the 1 to 2 year mark is whether or not you lean more towards rhythm or lead guitar.

I don't know enough about what's going on to help you much more than that, but I definitely wouldn't look at this as backwards progress.

Keep after it man, and if sweep picking is getting you down, set it aside and work on something else. I've been playing for 16 years and I'm still terrible at sweep picking haha.
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FirasKordi
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2012
1,192 IQ
#6
am more into rhythm , mostly into Progressive metal (which somehow combines rhythm with lead) ... thats why am trying to develop every aspect to reach the desired level of technique......and guys i am playing everyday , so am not leaving a zone of technique but this backwards progress is really obvious to me , only in my right hand
Shadowofravenwo
Recent tube convert
Join date: Feb 2012
1,676 IQ
#7
Quote by robertwilliam9


One question I think you should be trying to answer at the 1 to 2 year mark is whether or not you lean more towards rhythm or lead guitar.



Why is it an or?
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Dreamdancer11
Registered User
Join date: Nov 2012
38 IQ
#8
Quote by Archer250
I didn't practice alternate picking and sweep picking in favor of legato for 5 days; it took me 2 days of constant practice to get back to where I was with sweep picking. My alternate picking never quite recovered...

Your skill is like a knife: unless sharpen regularly, it will dull.


What you claim is close to impossible.There something that it is as true to guitar playing as it is to sports and that is...muscle memory.IF(big if) you have a skill down and the mechanics of it then you wont lose it even if a couple of years pass let alone days.

Now if you trying to learn many things at the same time and you havent really mastered any of them then yes but then you didnt lose something cause you didnt have it in the first place .
Shadowofravenwo
Recent tube convert
Join date: Feb 2012
1,676 IQ
#9
Quote by Dreamdancer11
What you claim is close to impossible.There something that it is as true to guitar playing as it is to sports and that is...muscle memory.IF(big if) you have a skill down and the mechanics of it then you wont lose it even if a couple of years pass let alone days.

Now if you trying to learn many things at the same time and you havent really mastered any of them then yes but then you didnt lose something cause you didnt have it in the first place .


Yeah, I was wondering how you lose a mastered or even a skill you are competent at that quickly.
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Archer250
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2012
569 IQ
#10
Quote by Shadowofravenwo
Yeah, I was wondering how you lose a mastered or even a skill you are competent at that quickly.


Because I haven't "mastered" or even become competent at it yet, of course.
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sea`
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2007
12 IQ
#11
The answer is: we all get times where we are very fluid and successful with certain techniques, and other times where we just can't manage them well. Often this will change on a day to day basis, and I find that when practicing sometimes I'll have a bad day and sometimes I'll have a great day where I can play way better than normal. It happens, and it's as much mental as it is physical fatigue and confidence.

The fact is that if you can't sweep as well or do downstrokes as fast after a few days/week of not using them, to be honest, you probably were not very good to begin with, certainly not good enough to become fully entrenched into your muscle memory. When you stop having to really think about a technique and can do it even under the worst circumstances, then you can confidently say you know it well; otherwise you're still learning.

The difference between an amateur and a professional is that a professional can play all his/her material perfectly under any situation, whether that's on a different instrument, different venue, while sick or with a headache, etc. One you acknowledge you still have to work on your playing then you can focus on improving and becoming more consistent, instead of focusing on the negative.