#1
Here I am at work, sitting wondering what will be the next generation of classic, vintage, collectible guitars like the 59 Les Paul, ES-335, Old Strats etc. Anybody got any ideas? I'm guessing it will still be the same old suspects, but what with mass production....... Thoughts?
#2
There won't be any.

1977 Burny FLG70
2004 EBMM JP6
2016 SE Holcolmb
#3
Probably guitars like;

-certain minor brands like Eastwood/Danelectro/Silvertone/Tokai/etc
-12-string Fenders/Les Pauls/etc
-Pawn Shop series if they'd discontinue them

That's what I think though
#4
Agreed with Amir on the first point. I hope that minor brands that don't get nearly the attention they deserve like Silvertone or Danelectro become the classics of the future.
#5
Anything with Brazilian Rosewood.
Quote by CLVPX
Wow, SkyValley = Epic win.
#6
Quote by SkyValley
Anything with Brazilian Rosewood.


Or just anything with wood, depending on how 'future' we're talking...
#7
I also think that any guitar with an extremely flat fretboard will become collectible, as there are only a handful in production with a radius of 20" or above. I can see them becoming more popular as music gets more technical.
Quote by CLVPX
Wow, SkyValley = Epic win.
#8
Well say if someone has a guitar now that's not worth much and they become famous (like godlike guitarist) then that model from that particular year may become very sought after.

For example I have a Natural Cort G260 made in 2008. If I become a godlike guitarist (I wish) and used this guitar live and recorded with it for my best selling album then in 60 years a Natural Cort G260 from 2008 may be worth a lot of money.

Just my thought on the subject
#9
Well; people are already collecting Paul Reed Smith guitars, but I don't know that there is any "Holy Grail" model, series or year that is recognized yet. Give it time. Beyond that, I can't see anything becoming tremendously sought-after in the future. Between the massive number of guitars that all of the major manufacturers produce and the seemingly endless number of boutique makers out there, I think people will be lusting after 1958-1960 Les Paul CSB Standards, pre-CBS Strats and Telecasters, and early Dot-Neck Gibson ES-335s well into the 22nd century.
"Drinking is a skill and should be recognized as such!"

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#11
Whatever they market to you.

=/

Shit just got real.
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#12
MIJ Superstrats.
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Taylor 414CE
#13
^Dude, people are lusting for those now

I think that with the exception of a few signature models, nothing will really be listed after like we lust after the classics. I mean, most of the modern production stuff is very "next best thing" or it's a more or less a rehash on old guitars..
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#14
The Parker Fly maybe?
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#15
BC Rich Bich with the picture of a chicks arse in a gstring......so rare

seriously that is actually the worst guitar i have ever played. i would take a squire every day of the week over it.
#16
Quote by Tom 1.0
There won't be any.



They will probably still say "they sure don't make them like they used too" referring to guitars build today.
#17
Quote by R45VT
They will probably still say "they sure don't make them like they used too" referring to guitars build today.
So shit's just gonna keep getting worse and worse as time progresses? A bleak view of the future you paint there.
I think more likely it will become good and bad eras. Whether this is a good or a bad era we are in now I will leave open to discussion. I have no opinion really.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#18
I like the direction that it's going in. However, if it's going to be full of Gibson Firebird X's, then we are all screwed.
Quote by Dunning~Kruger
Yes I was rude, and I was aggressive and I was offending a large group of people. But I was civlized about it.

Taylor 414CE
#19
Quote by cdr_salamander
I like the direction that it's going in. However, if it's going to be full of Gibson Firebird X's, then we are all screwed.


I am not looking forward to self tuning guitars. Bullshit.


Now I sound like an old man refusing to accept the way of the future.... disc brakes uh? Too complicated... no points in the distributor? I am retiring.
#20
I've played some bloody nice Chinese guitars lately. I think we will see a quantum jump in quality from China in the near future - just like what happened with Japanese guitars. Japanese guitars from when they first started making good stuff are now highly sought after. I think we will see the same with Chinese guitars. A time will come when "Made in China" will mean good, just as "Made in Japan" is today and the first of those will become classics.
Remember, Deep Purple's album "Made In Japan" was a joke at the time because MIJ meant shit.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#21
Quote by R45VT
I am not looking forward to self tuning guitars. Bullshit.

I think the Gibson Min-E tune system is pretty cool actually. I mean, how many years has it been since a guitar has had an innovation like that?

Next thing you know, it's going to adjust your truss rod too, and set your action perfectly from standard to drop-B, and then musicians won't have to have a whole cabinet of different guitars to take to a show.

I guess it's mostly about convenience now. However, I hope that they always keep the traditional guitars around.
Quote by Dunning~Kruger
Yes I was rude, and I was aggressive and I was offending a large group of people. But I was civlized about it.

Taylor 414CE
#22
Fender JV
First year Vince Cunetto made Custom Shop Relics (already fetching £4k +)
Greco's

There's 3.
#23
Quote by cdr_salamander
I think the Gibson Min-E tune system is pretty cool actually. I mean, how many years has it been since a guitar has had an innovation like that?

Next thing you know, it's going to adjust your truss rod too, and set your action perfectly from standard to drop-B, and then musicians won't have to have a whole cabinet of different guitars to take to a show.

I guess it's mostly about convenience now. However, I hope that they always keep the traditional guitars around.

And then the next thing will be a guitar that plays itself...

But seriously, I don't think there will be any new classic guitars. Because IMO Strat and Les Paul and other classic shapes are the best looking guitars. Why make something new if old body shapes look good? For example Ibanez RG is like more modern looking Strat but IMO it's uglier than a real Strat.

And I don't think you can improve guitar. Let guitars be guitars.
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Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#25
Quote by Kevin Saale
Reverse V, all day.


My Name is Cameron.
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Now get off my ****ing lawn.


#26
I would have said Ibanez Jems and PRS guitars. But then again I think we're already at that point.
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
Marshall 1960A
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
Fender Stratocaster x3 (2 of them built from bits and pieces!)
#27
old navigator and tokai les pauls are quietly rising in price.

an 80's tokai LS-80 sells for the same as an r8 on the used market.

pre-factory PRS are getting attention from collectors.

prs up until 1993 had braz boards, those are holding value.
#28
^agreed.

i also think the G&L's from before Leo's death will probably keep coming up in value. don't know if they'll be classics though.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#29
Quote by Cathbard
I've played some bloody nice Chinese guitars lately. I think we will see a quantum jump in quality from China in the near future - just like what happened with Japanese guitars. Japanese guitars from when they first started making good stuff are now highly sought after. I think we will see the same with Chinese guitars. A time will come when "Made in China" will mean good, just as "Made in Japan" is today and the first of those will become classics.
Remember, Deep Purple's album "Made In Japan" was a joke at the time because MIJ meant shit.



+1

Finally someone else who has come to this conclusion.

Also, maybe a Japan made Ibanez without the "Prestige" or "Premium" words for super-shredders 25 years from now.

The music cycle has to make one more full revolution away from shred and technical playing to something that's angst-y and chord-y and then back to technical playing again.
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#30
Self tuning guitars are great. I don't get why anyone would be against it.
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#31
Quote by Mephaphil
Self tuning guitars are great. I don't get why anyone would be against it.


i haven't played with one yet, but i can't really see the drawbacks.

i am pretty lukewarm on the concept, i'd prob buy one if they weren't so expensive. the way i feel about it is i can tune my guitar already, so paying that much more money so the guitar can tune itself is not that attractive to me.

but if i could get a guitar that does it for almost the price of one without auto tuning then i'd be down.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#32
Quote by Cathbard
Remember, Deep Purple's album "Made In Japan" was a joke at the time because MIJ meant shit.

for a lot of things yes, it was. same goes for the subsequent "made in tiawan" and "made in korea" periods.

like you say though, now it's china.

whenever mass manufacturing moves there is a learning curve.
#33
I can see early PRS guitars raising in value in the future.

The reason a lot pre 65 guitars are so pricey is because there were such a limited number of them. A lot of things were hand crafted and on a far smaller, less industrial scale then today. Rarity is a big part of the price tag. We no longer have this issue because of extreme factory automation. Larger numbers of guitars get produced now then ever devaluing them based on how common they are. Limited run guitars will usually maintain or even grow in price over time.
#34
Some of you have tagged a few of your favorites as 'can't miss' classics but perhaps it's a bit difficult to so enshrine any particular guitar. There are just so many variables involved.

SkyValley brought up a good point when he said "Anything with Brazilian rosewood". The availabilty of premium tonewoods is already in short supply. I'm reminded of the raid on the Gibson factory some years back when some $350K worth of illegal Madagascar rosewood was seized by the Department of Justice and again just a year or so ago when Gibson was investigated over the use of suspiciously aquired Indian ebony. Manufacturers (Gibson at least) are pushing the envelope in their efforts to obtain quality woods for their products. There are alternatives out there such as the Normany aluminum bodied offerings and the research in the field of composite materials for musical instrument construction continues. All to possibly, as SkyValley implies, influence the future value of guitars made of quality tonewoods.

Makers will certainly make their mark as some of you have already noted. Small shop luthiers such as Paul Reed Smith, Tom Anderson, John Suhr, Scott Lentz, Don Grosh and others have already reinvented the wheel of quality and quality instruments are sure to have an impact on future collectability. Gumbilicious mentioned G&L and the fact that the '64 to '91 products are steadily appreciating. Even today I would prefer a G&L ASAT Classic USA over any Fender USA to include Custom Shop models. There have been lawsuits filed by Fender and Gibson over 'shape' trademark infringement. Frivolous in my opinion as these 'shapes' were 'borrowed' from Paul Bigsby and Les Paul to begin with. Are Fender and Gibson really so concerned with the involved 'shapes' or are they intimidated by the mere fact that superior Strat, Tele, 335, Les Paul, SG and other styles are being produced by the small shop makers? Surely some of these are destined to become future gems.

Cathbard referenced the 'Asian invasion', chronicles it nicely, and with good reason. A high end MIJ guitar will rival a USA boutique guitar at half the price and the MIK offerings are now not far behind. As to the MIC pieces I'll offer this. I purchased a MIC Charvel Pro Stock DS1 'Hot Rodded' Les Paul clone a few months ago and was, frankly, overwhelmed with the overall quality and this thing is a player. With its neck through design, fit and finish is very good and it's loaded with Seymour Duncan, Schaller, Switchcraft etc. It's also a limited edition and many online music stores are already posting notes notes saying 'no longer available' and MoJo Music in Ontario, Canada, from their website, says that the entire country only received 6 of each color. Will this become the first MIC classic as Cathbard alluded to? Who knows but I'll say this with a modicum of certainty...There are Asian imports that will.

With good or bad taken into considerarion as a point of conjecture...They really don't make 'em like they used to.

Simply my thoughts on the subject.
Last edited by HotDan! at Mar 27, 2013,
#35
After pondering a bit about what Tom said ("There won't be any") I've changed my opinion concerning his opinion. I initially thought that his statement, although pretty succinct, straightforward and definately to the point, may have been a bit nieve concerning future guitar 'classics'. Hmm...maybe not. Maybe what we see in the future is just really cool old guitars to own. Oh...they'll be a bit spendy, make no mistake in that reguard and they'll be collectable too and vintage in every sense of the word...just not 'classic'. So with all due respect to SteveJB1989, I think I have to place 'classic', 'collectable', and 'vintage' in three separate catagories and probably in that order.

Making a concession to what I said earlier about how difficult it may be to single out a particular guitar for collectible status, I'll also add a +1 to Cathbard's Parker Fly nomination as a possible future collectable. It exhibits many innovative elements such as composite body construction and (I think ((Cathbard?)), the first piezos?). Although they were absolutely and completely butt ugly to look at, it was incredibly ahead of its time technology wise. Sadly and perhaps somewhat like the Raymond Lowey designed '53 Studebaker, a little to far ahead of its time.
Last edited by HotDan! at Mar 26, 2013,
#36
Guitars just like cars follow the 30 year rule, as soon as you drive them off the lot they drop in value and continue to drop in value for 30 years, then they start to rise in value
#37
I'd say there are a ton of current guitars out there that will increase in value. A lot will depend on the condition of the instrument, future demand, and rarity.

Something like the VAI2KDNA which has Vai's blood in the paint and already costs $6000+ will continue to increase until he dies. And then the price will go through the roof.

I've watched a couple other various guitars over a few years. The RG550XX in either fluorescent red and yellow has already gained about $100-$200 in value over the past 4 years. The James Hetfield sig series ESP's except for the Truckster have increased in value, with the Grynch nearly doubling the $2,500 base price since St. Anger.

IMO, the guitars that are associated with new technology should continue to decline until their prices stabilize and probably won't rise (beyond inflation) because new technology improves on what exists. You probably have and will see this with the Gibson Robot Guitar, that Fender midi guitar, Variaxes, several 7 and 8 strings (because improved models are becoming easier to find), and so on.
Major of 7 String Legion 7 > 6

Carvin DC747
Ibanez RG2228
Schecter Avenger Custom Shop
and my baby....
Gibson Explorer Studio
#38
While cars and guitars together do seem to follow a certain intertwined histrical path with Fenders' innovative advertising of the '50's and 60's likely playing a large role, I don't recall ever hearing the all encompassing '30 year rule'. Interesting observation.
Last edited by HotDan! at Mar 28, 2013,
#39
I think the chat about MIC guitars is a fair point, I've played alot of the recent Squier CV stuff (MIC) and have nothing but good things to report back on?

I'd genuinely feel robbed buying a new MIM tele over the CV tele...

I think the used market right now is interesting, in my opinion 00s MIM prices are dropping all the time, whereas a used CV is keeping its value?

By no means an expert but an interesting debate on here (for once)