MightySumo
I love lamp
Join date: Jul 2008
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#1
I've been doing a little research on these since seeing them featured in a few youtube videos and I've noticed them popping up more and more. I just don't know how to feel about this bridge system because of all the little springs and moving parts and such. I guess I'm a less is more kind of guy but can this thing really be the guitar's reckoning?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=rAtnUz82HdY
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gregs1020
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#2
sliced bread = way overrated.



on topic though, do the guitars have to be routed out? i got to 4 min and bailed.
MightySumo
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#3
Quote by gregs1020
sliced bread = way overrated.



on topic though, do the guitars have to be routed out? i got to 4 min and bailed.


Yeah, all guitars that have to be retrofitted need a huge amount of work. Which is why I'm skeptical because all the guitars featuring them factory installed are $1000+
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#4
I've seen them on some custom guitars from big names out there, and if it's good enough for Satriani, it's good enough for me!
They are installed by specialized tech's, so I guess that your guitar will be ok in their hands.
So far I haven't heard anyone complaining yet.
zl1288
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2007
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#5
I think it's a really cool technology and apparently it works very well. I just don't really see this as a viable replacement bridge, the cost is very high and it's a pretty intrusive modification to fit it to your guitar. It looks like it would cost $500+ to buy & have one installed on your guitar.

They do sell guitars with the bridge installed on their website, and the prices seem to be pretty decent (especially considering the cost of the bridge/installation). http://www.evertune.com/evertuned-guitars-for-sale-3/
Roc8995
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#6
"No complaints" is kind of a weak argument for something that barely anyone owns. The fact that a bunch of pros 'use' (read: own) it doesn't tell me anything, other than that maybe they're getting it for free and are willing to try anything new and interesting.

This same thing happened with AxCent a few years ago - Jimmy Page had one, Van Halen had one, Joe Perry had one, but as it turns out it was stupid expensive and you had to route out half the guitar, and even when Gibson made a cheaper version and built it into their production guitars they couldn't give the things away. And everyone at the time thought, oh god, this is the future of the guitar, kids will never learn how to tune an instrument, your guitar is going to stop working halfway through a gig for a software update, etc etc - and it never happened. So I don't put much stock in the "X guy uses it, I've only heard good things" for a product that nobody's ever used in the wild before.

On the other hand - LTD is coming out with an Evertune EC-1000, and it's not that expensive. Hopefully they'll start showing up at Guitar Centers so people can try them out. I think it's an interesting idea and if they got the execution right it should be a great product.
http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/EC1000ETBLK?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=PPC&utm_campaign=none&gclid=CJqsh_a5ibYCFY4WMgodTg0AAQ
JesusCrisp
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#7
I think that Evertune is a cool little invention.
Played a couple of VGS guitars with those installed in a shop when testing amps and stuff.
It's cool because you can be pretty sure that the guitar is in tune, which most of the other guitars in the shop were not.

Anyway, I thought it was a cool feature and it really didn't feel weird to play on or anything, so basically I say it's cool.

Would it be the main selling point for me when buying a new guitar though?
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Zigioman
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#8
I think the robot tuning system is more effective than this but they are both trying to fix a problem that doesn't need to be fixed. tuning is important for developing ones ear musically
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#9
Quote by Zigioman
I think the robot tuning system is more effective than this but they are both trying to fix a problem that doesn't need to be fixed. tuning is important for developing ones ear musically



I dont think these are meant for your everyday bedroom guitarist, but for professionals dragging their instruments from gig to another and worry if their guitar goes out of tune between or during gigs.

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JustRooster
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#10
Seems like a very expensive alternative to learning how wind strings and set up your tremolo properly.

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W4RP1G
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#11
Quote by MaaZeus
I dont think these are meant for your everyday bedroom guitarist, but for professionals dragging their instruments from gig to another and worry if their guitar goes out of tune between or during gigs.

It seems like these things are being marketed to everyone, but they really do only seem practical for a touring guitarist. For a bedroom player and recording, it seems like a huge hassle and a serious waste of money.

And I hope all of the people that hate Floyds aren't supporting these things because they look to be much harder to setup.
gregs1020
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#12
Quote by MightySumo
Yeah, all guitars that have to be retrofitted need a huge amount of work. Which is why I'm skeptical because all the guitars featuring them factory installed are $1000+

yeah screw that then. i'll stick to the usual suspects.
Tom 1.0
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#13
Chappers is a massive fan unsurprisingly...... So I'm out.
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Darkdevil725
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#14
Quote by W4RP1G


And I hope all of the people that hate Floyds aren't supporting these things because they look to be much harder to setup.

I support these things fullly. If I had the money I would buy the MH1000 they are advertising on preorder that comes with this.

Also here is Keith Merrow using,abusing, restringing his. Looks pretty simple.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hW_iiNo2ECE
Acϵ♠
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#15
Im sold. I want one so bad.
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sea`
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#16
Quote by JustRooster
Seems like a very expensive alternative to learning how wind strings and set up your tremolo properly.

You do realize Evertune isn't a tremolo right? It's a fixed bridge which keeps perfect tuning.

Advantages:

- strings will NEVER go out of tune because their tension is equalized by spring tension, even if the neck moves, you bash the headstock, humidity changes, you tug hard on the strings, etc.
- string changes are very fast because no string stretching is required and you can tune without requiring any sort of fine-tuning, as the springs will "lock" in place when you get to the general vicinity of required tension

Disadvantages:

- cost
- possibly looks
- maybe don't want to install it on an existing guitar

I agree with what some others are saying in that this is a bridge fully targeted at professional musicians whose gear gets tortured by the road and gigging conditions, not your average home player. A well-made guitar strung properly shouldn't be going out of tune anyway unless you do something stupid, and in that respect there's nothing wrong with existing options. But, in the studio, where you want tuning to be identical between tracks and songs, or when you don't want to have to set up your guitar after getting to every venue? Evertune is a pretty great solution.
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#17
I think it looks great. Fantastic, actually. Way better than the insubstantial look of a plain jane wilkinson bridge and much better than the cluttered mess of a floyd. Looks clean and elegant, almost. If i can find one, im snagging it.
Quote by yellowfrizbee
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MrFlibble
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#18
Quote by Tom 1.0
Chappers is a massive fan unsurprisingly...... So I'm out.

I want to find something he won't shill. I don't care what, just something. I want to go down in the history books as "that guy that found the one product Chappers badmouthed."

Anyhoo.

I've tired a guitar with an Evertune system. I stress, one guitar. I wouldn't like to pass judgement on the system just yet.

However, for what little it is worth, that one guitar didn't seem to hold tune any better than a typical locking/fine tuning system, the tone was more brittle than one of those 2TEK bridges, I've never heard a guitar with less sustain on open strings and it felt very uncomfortable under the hand. All of which lines up with my theory (stress: my theory) that the simpler you make the bridge the fuller tone, sustain and plain comfort you get (god bless tune-o-matics); the more complicated you make it, the more you lose.

I usually like to try something three or four times before writing it off (exception: Stetsbar, **** that mess), but so far I'm 1/3 in and it's not looking good.

And yes, personally I'd rather go with a Robot, Mini-E Tune or even that Peavey auto-tune guitar thing. Hell, gimmie a JTV Variax.
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Krauser
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#19
At this point in the game, adoption just seems to be the issue. I don't think I'd ever want to replace route an existing guitar for this bridge, unless it was some really pricey guitar that would make a 500+ dollar install worth it. So that pretty much leaves the manufacturers in a position where they need to start offering evertune models. Everything I've heard and seen about these looks great and the setup isn't hard at all, no harder than a Floyd (which still bugs me because I prefer setting up a Floyd to a regular fixed bridge myself), so the added benefit of the system looks great. I just wish they could build a model that would fit as a drop in for existing trem cavities, though that would appear pretty difficult to pull off, especially with all of the mechanical gizmos they have going on in there. Very cool though, and any new device that offers such stability is a plus in my book.
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#20
Quote by Darkdevil725
I support these things fullly. If I had the money I would buy the MH1000 they are advertising on preorder that comes with this.

Also here is Keith Merrow using,abusing, restringing his. Looks pretty simple.

Kieth didn't do a setup on it, he swapped another set of the same exact strings. He even says that in the video. Have you seen the back of a guitar with this bridge?



Yeah, if you dislike setting up a Floyd, then you're gonna hate this thing.
desperatechris
Banned
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#21
I have met that guy in the picture Tony Denander and i have also played that guitar.

The guitar plays great and stays in tune no matter what, but it somehow feels wrong.
Supernaut2k
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#22
I really don't understand these things, you have to pay a shit load of money and route out a significant part of your guitar for a non floating trem? why?

Can you easily and quickly change separate string tunings? As far as I'm concerned the main advantage of a fixed bridge is just that, otherwise whats the point?
MaaZeus
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#23
Quote by Supernaut2k
I really don't understand these things, you have to pay a shit load of money and route out a significant part of your guitar for a non floating trem? why?

Can you easily and quickly change separate string tunings? As far as I'm concerned the main advantage of a fixed bridge is just that, otherwise whats the point?



Its not a trem, its a fixed bridge that holds its tune perfectly, guitar wont go out of tune when strings break in or stretch from use and so on.

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frenster
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#24
Hi guys, I have a google alert for Evertune because I think it's a great product. I'm an authorized installer, but have no other stake in the company other than that. I'm not a shill, I'm a fan.

They came to me a few years ago to install a few of them for their first NAMM show, and I, being a jaded luthier, was quite skeptical about a guitar that never goes out of tune. I was completely blown away by it. It worked as advertised, and set up properly, feels like a conventional guitar. Since then I've installed dozens of them, many for high profile working pros, both stage and studio, and I can tell you from personal knowledge they are being used regularly by touring artists, studio musicians, and producers.

Just to clarify, it is a fixed bridge system, it's an invasive install, and it's not cheap. The working pros who come in with more guitars to install them on are more interested in keeping in tune than saving a buck. They are also more interested in not having to worry about staying in tune for a song or a set or a recording session. I have one client who plays with a name act, and he just brought me two more guitars to install them on…PRS single cuts! I have another touring pro who loves them so much he had me install them on a Harmony and a Teisco! He loves the cheap guitars, but they never stay in tune. He also has one in a Tele and a 335.

Another great thing is that, unlike the robot style guitars, this is purely mechanical (no batteries) and keeps it in tune WHILE you are playing. On robot guitars if you go out of tune in the middle of a song, too bad. Other great features are that since each string has it's own module, if you break a string, all the others stay perfectly in tune. And when you go to put a new string on, the module is already set to the tension of that string, so all you have to do is some fine tuning and you're done. Very quick string changes.

Out of all the installs I have done I've had two people who didn't like it, and not because it didn't work properly. One guy thought it robbed tone, which may be true, but you'd have to be a real "cork sniffer" to notice. Everybody else is over the moon with it.

It's not for people who can't tune their guitars, it's for people who can't afford to have their guitars out of tune. That said, I've also installed plenty for bedroom players and non-pros.

For those who say it's an answer looking for a problem, remember how much time you spend tuning while you're recording. Between every take? Add up that time and pretend you're paying for every minute. it gets expensive.

There are some disadvantages, for example, if you like to do vibrato by moving the neck back and forth, it's not for you.

I know some of you will think I'm a shill. And I'll bet every one who does hasn't tried it for themselves. I'll say again, I'm a fan. I've seen a lot of guitar technology and it's the only product I gush about. I have a good reputation in my field and I wouldn't jeopardize that by pushing a crappy product.

Sorry about the long post, but I've tried to be thorough. I'll be happy to answer any questions you may have about it.
---
Frenster
Last edited by frenster at Mar 21, 2013,
Acϵ♠
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#25
^^ how much is it and is it possible to install in my garage
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frenster
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#26
Quote by Acϵ♠
^^ how much is it and is it possible to install in my garage


The bridge is $330, but I don't think your garage needs an Evertune.

Seriously though, it's not an easy install, there are several templates to get for it and lots of routing, and specialized tools for an LP style install, so unless you have lots of woodworking experience and a strong eye for detail, I'd think twice about doing it yourself. If you do, I'll be happy to give you any advice you need.
---
Frenster
Roc8995
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#27
Hey, thanks for posting that, great to have someone who's actually worked with a few.

How do bending and vibrato work on it? As far as I can tell the mechanism is supposed to keep tension constant, so how does it work when you want a little variation in pitch?

What's maintenance like after installation? What do you have to do when changing string gauges or tunings?

The only thing I'm not sure I'm ready to believe is that the installation doesn't change the tone. Even routing out a strat cavity for a different trem changes the tone a bit. I guess I can't imagine that taking a couple of pounds of wood out to install one of these on a LP wouldn't make it sound different.
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#28
Quote by Roc8995
Hey, thanks for posting that, great to have someone who's actually worked with a few.

How do bending and vibrato work on it? As far as I can tell the mechanism is supposed to keep tension constant, so how does it work when you want a little variation in pitch?

What's maintenance like after installation? What do you have to do when changing string gauges or tunings?

The only thing I'm not sure I'm ready to believe is that the installation doesn't change the tone. Even routing out a strat cavity for a different trem changes the tone a bit. I guess I can't imagine that taking a couple of pounds of wood out to install one of these on a LP wouldn't make it sound different.


I'll try to explain. If the Evertune is already adjusted, when you put on a new string, it'll tune up conventionally until you get to pitch, then it'll stay the same pitch for about 4 or 5 turns. That's the "sweet spot" where the unit is active. Past that it will act conventionally again and go up in pitch. The trick is to set it up at the edge of the sweet spot, so if you don't bend or do vibrato, it's in the sweet spot, but if you bend or do vibrato, it goes out f the sweet spot. The closer to the edge of the sweet spot, the more conventional the guitar feels. I hope that's a clear explanation.

Since it adjusts to the tension of the strings, if you use the same gauge and brand, it'll tune up to within a few cents of the correct pitch and all you have to do is some fine tuning and it's right in there, so string changes are probably easier than most conventional guitars. It strings through the back like a Strat.

I haven't had too many complaints about it changing the tone, though it does a little, but probably not much different than simply playing a different guitar. Sometimes there's a tad less sustain, but I haven't had any complaints about that either. I've heard from some they have better sustain and tone, so I think it varies from guitar to guitar.

The amount of wood removed is not quite half a pound, and the unit is slightly over a pound, so it adds about a pound to most guitars.

Hope that helps.
---
Frenster
Roc8995
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#29
Ok, so you sort of have to get it dialed in so that it doesn't cancel out your vibrato? That makes sense. Does it just get farther from the sweet spot instead of going out of tune? So instead of being out of tune it might just be harder to pull vibrato out of it? Or is it just all in the setup?

How long would you say it takes to adjust for a new gauge of strings?
lemurflames
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#30
From what I understand, you tune it at the bridge. Then you can turn the tuning knobs. The counter-tension springs in the bridge will prevent the tuning knobs from changing the tuning until you hit the limit. The limit where it is right on the edge of going out of tune. The perfect setting allowing for bends and vibrato. You can also have it far away from that limit. Neat for heavy-handed rhythm, but you obviously give up bends and vibrato.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=RzoxGBstjsk#t=258s

Ola demonstrates it a little. There are even better videos out there showing off how it works. And from what I've seen, restringing and setup is crazy fast. x_x

http://www.evertune.com/evertuned-guitars-for-sale-3/

The EverTune site has some guitars for pre-order. I'd be all over the MH1000-ET if it wasn't gloss black.
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frenster
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#31
Quote by Roc8995
Ok, so you sort of have to get it dialed in so that it doesn't cancel out your vibrato? That makes sense. Does it just get farther from the sweet spot instead of going out of tune? So instead of being out of tune it might just be harder to pull vibrato out of it? Or is it just all in the setup?

How long would you say it takes to adjust for a new gauge of strings?


Actually it just gets deeper INTO the sweet spot. It should be set up at the edge of it going sharp. If the string stretches you have to bend it a little more to get to the right note or for vibrato. Like any guitar, after the strings are stretched it won't veer much. Usually good for at least a set. Any tweaks should be minor (no pun intended) to bring it up to the edge.
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#32
Quote by lemurflames
From what I understand, you tune it at the bridge. Then you can turn the tuning knobs. The counter-tension springs in the bridge will prevent the tuning knobs from changing the tuning until you hit the limit. The limit where it is right on the edge of going out of tune. The perfect setting allowing for bends and vibrato. You can also have it far away from that limit. Neat for heavy-handed rhythm, but you obviously give up bends and vibrato.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=RzoxGBstjsk#t=258s

Ola demonstrates it a little. There are even better videos out there showing off how it works. And from what I've seen, restringing and setup is crazy fast. x_x

http://www.evertune.com/evertuned-guitars-for-sale-3/

The EverTune site has some guitars for pre-order. I'd be all over the MH1000-ET if it wasn't gloss black.


You are correct on everything you've said.
---
Frenster
JustRooster
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#33
So, for dudes like me who change tunings multiple times through shows, this probably isn't the solution?

Quote by EyeNon15
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HowlerMonkey
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#36
I discussed the exact same bridge idea in the early 1980s with tom scholz and came to the conclusion that musicians weren't ready to make the jump at that time.

Of course, he said the same thing about my sustainer idea.

Tom Scholz has multiple bridge patents.

It is basically 6 individual tremolos as far as function..........except it has no tremolo bar or tremolo functionality.

The reason it killed sustain to the people who tried it is because the mass of the six individual saddles needs to be about 10 times more than it currently is...........reminds me of the floyd rose copies in which the tremolo block is not nearly as heavy as the original.

The energy is dissapated by the light weight components.

Add some mass and you will get more sustain and less wear since you won't be having the string causing micromovements at the pivot points every time you pluck one.

If competent tremolo designer or someone with venture capital wants to discuss an idea that surpasses this in a huge way by including tremolo function to the mix, please PM me (I am serious).

I'm not downing the evertune totally...........I just want to find out who ventured 800 grand of venture capital on it.

This thread has re-awakened ideas first conceptualized over 30 years ago and maybe there is now money in those ideas.
Last edited by HowlerMonkey at Mar 27, 2013,
Travelstone
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#37
I got my custom Sign Guitar with an Evertune G Model tuned in drop B! This is really unbelievable! I got the guitar now one month and still not have to retune the guitar. And it feels good to play on it!

Here is a video of that guitar:

(removed)
Last edited by Travelstone at Jan 26, 2014,
T00DEEPBLUE
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#38
-_-

Stop necroing threads.
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xxdarrenxx
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#39
Quote by sea`
But, in the studio, where you want tuning to be identical between tracks and songs, or when you don't want to have to set up your guitar after getting to every venue? Evertune is a pretty great solution.


That being said, there are quite a few records that are recorded a quarter step in between notes which have become to go on as very succesfull.

I noticed this years ago, so couldn't tell you exactly which ones, but there were more than I ever imagined there'd be.

I think I remember a popular pantera album and/or song as such and maybe Van Halen album. Also one song by Ac Dc I believe (TNT or highway to hell) and even a few pop songs that charted high possibly number one, where you'd expect at least 440hz related tuning.

Like I said it's been years since I noticed this, but they are definitely there.

Also heard some records had this because of speeding up in the studio, before audio warping was as sophisticated as it is today, to retune it digitally.

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