antisun
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
120 IQ
#1
Is it just a compromise between good sustain/less fretbuzz and playability? Seems to me that i can either have a playable guitar, or a 100% buzz free long sustaining guitar that's only really useful for chords.

It's annoying to say the least. Am i doing something wrong here?
T00DEEPBLUE
Boba FRETT
Join date: Oct 2010
260 IQ
#2
Nope. Getting the action perfect is largely about compromise and trial and error.
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BradIon1995
Registered User
Join date: Oct 2012
30 IQ
#3
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Nope. Getting the action perfect is largely about compromise and trial and error.


This. Also, you may need to push through the awkwardness of the higher action until you get used to it.

/Thread.
Ibanez TSA30 < Boss OS-2 < Custom Frankenstein Strat w/ scalloped board and Epi LP pickup
stonyman65
Unregistered User
Join date: Sep 2005
160 IQ
#4
Quote by antisun
Is it just a compromise between good sustain/less fretbuzz and playability? Seems to me that i can either have a playable guitar, or a 100% buzz free long sustaining guitar that's only really useful for chords.

It's annoying to say the least. Am i doing something wrong here?


Things to check:

Make sure the string radius matches the fretboard radius:
print-out radius gauges can be found here http://www.pickguardian.com/pickguardian/Images/Pickguardian%20Neck%20Radius%20Gauges

Set action correctly:
For 25.5 inch scale guitars, it should be about 4/64 on the bass side and 6/64 on the treble side (+/- 1/64) measured at the 17th fret

For 24.75 in scale guitars, it should be 6/64 on the bass side and 3/64 on the treble side (+/- 1/64) measured at the 12th fret

Adjust the truss rod relief:
It should be around .008-.0010 of an inch around the 8th fret (while depressing the 1st and last fret)

Make sure the frets are all level with each other with no high spots:
Use a short (about 2 inches long) straight edge to see if it rocks on the frets, if it does, the fret you are on is high in relation to the other frets you are touching. If it doesn't move at all, it is the same height as the other frets.

Adjust the neck tilt:
Basically, the best way to explain what this does is that it allows you to adjust things without having to lower the saddles any lower than they should be. As a general rule, if everything is set up correctly and the action still feels high around the top of the neck, you would use shims (or a micro tilt if you have one) to make minor adjustments to raise the neck up. I really can't give you any measurements here because there are none (We're talking about thousands of an inch here). It just depends on the guitar in question.

Pickup height:
They should be roughly 1/8th of an inch from the strings.
note: lowering the pickups to an extent will give you more sustain because the magnet fields aren't messing with the string vibrations as much as they would if the pickups were closer to the strings.

Once you have all of this done correctly, your problems should be solved.

Keep in mind that there is really no way to completely get rid all the buzz, but you can get it to a point where you don't even notice it.
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Last edited by stonyman65 at Mar 21, 2013,
Kevin Saale
Talks to empty chairs
Join date: Dec 2007
140 IQ
#5
If you can't hear it buzzing through the amp, it isn't buzzing.

I think its a common problem where people want no buzz when they're playing unplugged, since thats generally how you'll adjust it. Just my opinion, but this is wrong. What does it matter if it buzzes a little unplugged? You don't record unplugged.
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antisun
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
120 IQ
#6
Quote by stonyman65
big giant post


the truss rod relief is perfectly set, the buzz is consistent along the neck so i'm almost positive it is action related. at the 12th fret the action at the low e string is about 3/32nds of an inch. i only notice buzz unplugged and during chords/powerchords. it's worst on the attack, i can barely if at all hear it on a clean setting plugged into my amp. as far as radius goes, nothing i can do about that if it is messed up. the bridge adjusts as a two screw type, meaning i can only adjust the high e side or low e side as a whole. the biggest offender is the low e, the a and d strings have a very slight amount of buzz but nothing that concerns me. the rest of the strings have no buzz.

i originally had my action set a bit higher as i absolutely hate buzz, and i ended up having to lower it because i wanted to work on getting faster speed, which was nearly impossible to do with the action set where i had it. when i lowered it the sustain went down and buzzing started.
Last edited by antisun at Mar 21, 2013,
Kevin Saale
Talks to empty chairs
Join date: Dec 2007
140 IQ
#7
Pretty common for the low E to buzz, it will have the longest 'swing' in its vibration.
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antisun
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
120 IQ
#8
just wanted to report back. put a piece of credit card in the neck slot. managed to get the action ridiculously low with hardly any buzz.
stonyman65
Unregistered User
Join date: Sep 2005
160 IQ
#9
Quote by antisun
just wanted to report back. put a piece of credit card in the neck slot. managed to get the action ridiculously low with hardly any buzz.


Yup that will do it.

That's the "neck tilt" part I was talking about.

It's just trial and error. You've got to mess around until you get it right.
Quote by strat0blaster
This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

Quote by Cathbard
I'm too old for the Jim Morrison look now. When I was gigging I had a fine arse.