NVDT
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#1
Hello everyone.

I started taking lessons a while ago in a fingerpicking course using my electric guitar (I recently started learning the guitar and it's the only guitar I own, altough I love it ),
and now I started looking into buying an acoustic one, but having learned on an electric I like the thinner strings and feel of it.
One that caught my eye, being some kind of hybrid, are the Ibanez Talman series, mainly the TCY10E, TCM50E, TCY8 ( and just my luck, those ones aren't reviewed on this site it seems, or search function is lying to me. The 20's are )
and to try those in the shop, I would have to go the extra (metaphorical) mile, so I prefer to ask here, also because I don't know a lot about guitars, being only a beginner, and I wouldn't want to pay too much for something that only sounds right in my untrained ears.

Now how do these "hybrids" really compare to regular acoustics ( especially unplugged ) ? Is the sound still nice for the price ( all around 200 euros ) compared to an acoustic of that price range, do they really handle like an electric (thinner strings, thinnerbody), how do these three models fare up against eachother, which one would you recommend as an (mainly unplugged ) acoustic, and more importantly : are they worth buying ?

I looked up specs, maybe someone that knows a lot more about guitar than I do can deduct some crucial facts I should need to know based on these specs:

Ibanez TCY10E Black
body shape:Talman Double Cutaway Body
top:Spruce Top
back & sides:Mahogany Back & Sides
neck:Mahogany Neck
pickup:Ibanez Under Saddle Pickup
preamp:Ibanez AEQ200T Preamp
tuning machine:Chrome Ibanez Smooth Tuner AS
nut & saddles:Ibanez Ivorex II™ Nut & Saddle
bridge pins:Ibanez Advantage™ Bridge Pins
strap button:Ibanez Strap Button for Acoustic Guitars
bridge & fretboard: Rosewood Bridge & Fretboard


Ibanez TCM50E
body shape:Talman Double Cutaway Body
top:Figured Ash Top
back & sides:Mahogany Back & Sides
neck:Mahogany Neck
pickup:Ibanez AP2 Magnetic Pickup
preamp:Ibanez AEQ200MT Preamp
tuning machine:Chrome Ibanez Smooth Tuner AS
nut & saddles:Ibanez Ivorex II™ Nut & Saddle
bridge pins:Ibanez Advantage™ Bridge Pins
strap button: Ibanez Strap Button for Acoustic Guitars
bridge & fretboard:Rosewood Bridge & Fretboard


IBANEZ TCY8
body shape:Talman Double Cutaway body
top:Spruce top
back & sides:Basswood back & sides
neck:Mahogany neck
pickup:Ibanez Under Saddle pickup
tuning machine:Chrome Die-cast tuners
bridge pins:Ibanez Advantage™ bridge pins
bridge & fretboard:Rosewood bridge and fretboard


I know this is a big post, but solving a couple of these questions would really help me , thanks in advance.
patticake
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#2
this isn't actually a hybrid - it's an acoustic guitar in an electric guitar's shape. this particular guitar sounds pretty poor, and the narrow nut isn't particularly suitable for fingerstyle.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
stepchildusmc
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#3
if your looking for an electric feel, try out a fender t-bucket, sonoran or an Ovation guitar. as patti points out, the narrower nut on all of them wii detract from fingerstyle playing.
Captaincranky
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#4
Quote by NVDT
One that caught my eye, being some kind of hybrid, are the Ibanez Talman series,....[ ]....
OK, the Ibanez "Talmans", are not a "hybrid" guitar. In fact, and IMHO, they are not either a good acoustic, or a decent electric.

If you Google Ibanez "Montage", they would be an example of a true hybrid. These are discontinued in the US, some some may still be for sale in Europe.

Any full size electric-acoustic with a piezoelectric, (under saddle) transducer, will give you a much more realistic acoustic experience, whether plugged or unplugged.

The Talman's body size is rather small, and most of them are all laminate. None of which contributes to them having a good voice acoustically.

Shop some more, and show us what else you can find...

Here's YouTube's "famous lefty" Jon Way, demoing a Crafter Hybrid. (Which by extension, is a Taylor T5 knockoff).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYHRQTcwMrI
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 26, 2013,
NVDT
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#5
Those are some very interesting things to know, thank you, I'll look into those names and see what I can find
also when you say "The narrower nut on all of them will detract from fingerstyle playing." do you mean t he narrower nut on all the Talmans or the narrower nut on the "electric feeling guitars" ?
Last edited by NVDT at Mar 26, 2013,
patticake
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#6
the narrower nut on any guitar with a narrower nut. most of us finger pickers prefer a minimum of 1 3/4" - some of us prefer even wider - 1 13/16" or even 1 7/8". i have very small hands, but discovered after years of playing slender neck guitars that my fingerstyle improved in fluidity and speed when playing guitars with wider nuts and string spacing.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
NVDT
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#7
I looked into the guitars stepchildusmc recommended and (because the T-bucket is not available anymore in my store, even though they are cheaper, and I wouldn't want to order something I haven't had in my hands) the Fender Sonoran SCE looks good and has good reviews on this site, but it's more expensive and has a smaller nut than the T, being at 1 5/8.

Now I've been looking for more "traditional" acoustics and semi-acoustics ( because if having a wider nut improves fingerstyle even after having it figured out, better learn fingerstyle with the right equipment right away instead of having to adjust later on ).

This was the Washburn EA10 ( cheaper -I'm a student and can't afford everything :p -,with a 1.69" nut so a tad bigger than the above ones).
Captaincranky
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#8
Quote by NVDT
....[ ]....This was the Washburn EA10 ( cheaper -I'm a student and can't afford everything :p -,with a 1.69" nut so a tad bigger than the above ones).
You do realize that the decimal equivalent of, "1 5/8 inches", is 1.0625 inches.

So that's a whopping 5.5 THOUSANDTHS difference.
NVDT
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#9
wait isn't it 1 5/8 = 1.625 inches ? 8/8 is 1 inch, so 5/8 is 5*(1/8) which is about 5* 0.125, because 8 times the 0.125 would make the 1 inch again ?
Or even : 1+5/8 inches, = 8/8 + 5/8 inches = 13/8 inches = 13*0.125 inches= 1.625 inches

Or does the phrase 1 5/8 inch not mean what I think it means (I count in metric)?

Anyway, it's (the washburn) a tadbit bigger, but about the same bigger than the Fender than it's smaller than the "preferred minimum" for fingerpicking.
Last edited by NVDT at Mar 26, 2013,
Captaincranky
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#10
Quote by NVDT
wait isn't it 1 5/8 = 1.625 inches ? 8/8 is 1 inch, so 5/8 is 5*(1/8) which is about 5* 0.125, because 8 times the 0.125 would make the 1 inch again ?
Or even : 1+5/8 inches, = 8/8 + 5/8 inches = 13/8 inches = 13*0.125 inches= 1.625 inches

Or does the phrase 1 5/8 inch not mean what I think it means (I count in metric)?

Anyway, it's (the washburn) a tadbit bigger, but about the same bigger than the Fender than it's smaller than the "preferred minimum" for fingerpicking.


No, I just accidentally stuffed in an extra zero. 1/16" is .0625, and I had that stuck in my head, thinking that Ibanez acoustics are usually 1 11/16".

That would be, as you say, "1.625". the difference between that and 1.69 equals .065 (65 thousandths), or about .013" per string gap.

Believe it or not Agile, (Rondo Music), sells a wide neck version of their Les Paul copies @ 1 3/4". So, if you want to channel your inner Lindsey Buckingham or Mark Knopfler, that would be another place to start.

The only steel sting acoustic that springs immediately to mind @ 1 3/4" neck width is the Seagull Original S-6, and it's out of your budget.

In any event, 1 3/4" inch necks are getting harder and harder to find.

So, shop more, and/or save more money, because that's the paradigm this neck width issue is generating.

Or, you could consider this. The Yamaha FG700 has a 1 11/16" nut width and costs 200 USD. So, in lieu of the Talman and Washburn shit, buy one of those, everybody else has, and they're very happy with them.

I expect that if you don't know how to finger pick a guitar, and begin to try learning to do so, going in with the idea that you can't possibly do it on a 1 11/16" neck, will make it 3 times as hard as it should be.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 26, 2013,
patticake
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#11
the seagull original s6 is out of your budget - unless you buy used, that is. the yamaha fg700 is definitely one of the best bang for the buck guitars around, as it's well made with a solid top, and sounds pretty good, too. there are recording kings here (not sure about where you are) that sell for just under $300 and the parlors and 000s have the wider nut. they sound good, too.

i'm actually seeing more 1 3/4" nuts than i used to, but not at the lowest prices for some reason. an example is that taylor offers 1 3/4" nuts on almost all their guitars except their made-in-mexico series - the babies, 100 and 200 series. go figure! yamaha offers 1 3/4" nuts on some of the L series, but not the less expensive FG series. blueridge offers 1 3/4" nuts on their A guitars, which have adi tops and cost more, but only offer a wider nut on their parlor in their regular series, and it's one of their more expensive non-bling guitars.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
NVDT
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#12
Ok thanks everyone for your help, and i'll definately look into the FG 700 if it's really that amazing.
stepchildusmc
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#13
i like the fg700s. it's a decent starter guitar. it has excellent dollar for sound content( i recently bought 6 of them to donate to a local youth center... never got to play any of 'em). i actually sat down today and played one for about a half hour at a music shop i like to haunt. it's a great sounding guitar. nobody will ever mistake it for a Taylor but, not bad.
patticake
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#14
no one will mistake it for a taylor, and i prefer the seagull original s6. that being said, in its price range it sounds better and is more resonant than the competition.

btw, that was very good of you to donate them to your youth center

Quote by stepchildusmc
i like the fg700s. it's a decent starter guitar. it has excellent dollar for sound content( i recently bought 6 of them to donate to a local youth center... never got to play any of 'em). i actually sat down today and played one for about a half hour at a music shop i like to haunt. it's a great sounding guitar. nobody will ever mistake it for a Taylor but, not bad.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
Captaincranky
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#15
One (1) Euro, as of today, equals $1.29 in US currency.

PS; I checked, double checked, then checked again, the math in this post....
stepchildusmc
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#16
pure selfishness patti... i need someone in my area with the same musical interests. everyone in this area plays country music ! i'm just growing a band !
chadbo
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#17
I think you would enjoy a solid top dreadnought or jumbo acoustic guitar. They are bigger than what you are used to, but they will be significantly louder than a smaller acoustic, i.e. the talman. You can get a great acoustic guitar with a solid top for under $200 these days. Check out some guitars from Yamaha, Kona, and Johnson. For the money they are Great!
GypsyJen
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#18
Quote by chadbo
Check out some guitars from Yamaha, Kona, and Johnson. For the money they are Great!
I dont know why so many people have a problem with Yamaha, seems they get a bad wrap for some reason...I personally enjoy most Yamaha's especially when compared to alot of Ibanez's accoustic, which often are laminate vs. wood and can be more focused on visual appeal instead of sound quality...which is OK if that is what you are looking for. At any rate, the truth of the matter is when trying to find a suitable acoustic, especially when you are used to playing electric, there is no substitute for "hands on" trial, meaning if it feels good in your hands and you like the way it sounds then there is your winner. People have different preferences when it comes to how an acoustic should sound, some prefer the deep, warm sound, while others prefer the sort of squeaky brassy sound...one thing I will tell you is you MUST MUST MUST MUST plug in when trying out, some acoustics, especially those that are less expensive do not translate well when plugged up. Hope this was helpful.
Captaincranky
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#19
Quote by GypsyJen
I dont know why so many people have a problem with Yamaha, seems they get a bad wrap for some reason..
Where exactly is it in this forum that you hear Yamaha acoustics, "getting a bad rap"?

If you want to stick with that assertion, I'm going to offer a counter proposal. Which would be, either you can't read, or you're delusional.


Quote by GypsyJen
I personally enjoy most Yamaha's especially when compared to a lot of Ibanez's accoustic, which often are laminate vs. wood and can be more focused on visual appeal instead of sound quality...which is OK if that is what you are looking for. At any rate, the truth of the matter is when trying to find a suitable acoustic, especially when you are used to playing electric, there is no substitute for "hands on" trial, meaning if it feels good in your hands and you like the way it sounds then there is your winner. People have different preferences when it comes to how an acoustic should sound, some prefer the deep, warm sound, while others prefer the sort of squeaky brassy sound...one thing I will tell you is you MUST MUST MUST MUST plug in when trying out, some acoustics, especially those that are less expensive do not translate well when plugged up. Hope this was helpful.
Ibanez acoustics tend to sound quite decent plugged in. (Whatever they're made from). Even my much maligned, crappy,"Exotic Wood" model, has a kick ass chorus that simply sparkles......aannnnd, it's a jumbo....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 27, 2013,
patticake
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#20
lots of people hear yamaha and immediately have a negative reaction. i've replied to them on this board and agf, as well as in many stores or with friends who are buying a guitar. i've never figured out why.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
GypsyJen
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#21
It would appear that Captaincranky and I are at odds on our opinions. I never said that I saw in this forum that Yamaha's have a bad wrap,although many of the people I ahve talked with havea bad opinion of Yamaha, for some reason. I said that I enjoy playing most Yamahas' vs. most Ibanezs' when it comes to accoustics. I never said one was somehow superior to the other or somehow better than the other. Similarly, it is a fact that Ibanez does use laminates in the production of some of their models, which also is something that I do not prefer over all. I do however own a very nice electric acoustic Ibanez that produces a sweet sound weather plugged in or not. IN MY EXPERIENCE this tends to be the exception rather than the rule with Ibanez when it comes to acoustic guitars that are in the same price range. The point I was trying to make is that no matter what your preference or my preference or anyone else's preference is, the brand of that guitar makes no difference as long as you like the sound it produces.
Captaincranky
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#22
Quote by GypsyJen
It would appear that Captaincranky and I are at odds on our opinions. I never said that I saw in this forum that Yamaha's have a bad wrap,although many of the people I ahve talked with havea bad opinion of Yamaha, for some reason. I said that I enjoy playing most Yamahas' vs. most Ibanezs' when it comes to accoustics. I never said one was somehow superior to the other or somehow better than the other. Similarly, it is a fact that Ibanez does use laminates in the production of some of their models, which also is something that I do not prefer over all. I do however own a very nice electric acoustic Ibanez that produces a sweet sound weather plugged in or not. IN MY EXPERIENCE this tends to be the exception rather than the rule with Ibanez when it comes to acoustic guitars that are in the same price range. The point I was trying to make is that no matter what your preference or my preference or anyone else's preference is, the brand of that guitar makes no difference as long as you like the sound it produces.
If somebody comes through here with 200 bucks for a guitar, the standard go to suggestion is the Yamaha FG700.

Nobody has suggested to the TS, he investigate other Ibanez models. In fact, the self same Yamaha was recommended to him.

So, we're not, "at odds", as you put it. You just weren't talking to any Ibanez supporters, Yamaha detractors HERE

I'm practically afraid to even suggest I enjoy playing either one of my Ibanez acoustics.

Are we on the same page that the average, run of the mill Talman is junk?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 27, 2013,
stepchildusmc
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#23
and even the higher end ones!
truth be told... I have never played an ibanez acoustic myself but judging from the common opinion in here, i probably wouldn't unless i had 5 hours to kill in a music shop instead of 2 or 3. there of course are exceptions to the rule and as you said... opinions are very subjective when it comes to how a guitar should sound. i played some very high end Gibsons on tuesday and couldn't believe the hype they get ! for a bunch of $4-5000 guitars they sounded horrible to me. but that's my opinion, i understand that they are held in a pretty high regard by most.
what it realy comes down to is....yes...Talmans are poo( i haven't tried one of those either but, i'd take a Yammie over it every time)
Captaincranky
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#24
Quote by stepchildusmc
....[ ]....I played some very high end Gibsons on tuesday and couldn't believe the hype they get ! for a bunch of $4-5000 guitars they sounded horrible to me. but that's my opinion, I understand that they are held in a pretty high regard by most.
what it realy comes down to is....yes...Talmans are poo( I haven't tried one of those
I suspect that Gibson guitars are to professional musicians what high end Canon and Nikons are to professional photographers. You get judged, more than likely, (and no doubt a bit unfairly), on the basis of "you are what you play, or you are what you shoot with".
NVDT
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#25
My "Definately-have-to-try-those" list is getting good ideas from this topic, so shooting back at one of the earliest suggestions, does anyone have hands-on Feedback about the Fender Sonoran ? The reviews seem to be saying it's a good guitar (but hey you never know, could be like the Talman).
stepchildusmc
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#26
we have a few here that have them and can offer up some decent advice/reviews of them... ahem...ahem...enter cranky...
patticake
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#27
proving once again that everyone has their own preferences. the gibson jackson browne makes my personal list as one of the very best sounding guitars i've ever played. and i love the sound of just about any j-45 or gibson jumbo. i don't like the hummingbird, though, and am underwhelmed by some of their smaller guitars, however.

the sonoran definitely sounds better than the talman. given the choice, i would go for the sonoran. it's got a bigger, more resonant body, a solid top and a maple neck - i find adding that brightness from the maple helps fight the boxiness of the laminate back and sides.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
Captaincranky
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#28
Quote by stepchildusmc
we have a few here that have them and can offer up some decent advice/reviews of them... ahem...ahem...enter cranky...
Yeah, I'm here. Do you guys want the cheery, "you simply must have one of these, I've never been
happier with anything in my life version", or the unexpurgated warts and all truth?

Anyway I put this computer to sleep, pulled the PS-2 interface keyboard to clean it, and it wasn't detected upon resume. So, we went from straight line keyboard to full M$ split ergonomic and I'm struggling badly..... (USB is hot swappable). Have keyboard, will travel....

Anyway, the thing most people have against the Sororan is its looks. Stratocaster headstock and all that. I like it, but I could only buy a natural finish model, since that's all they offer in LH. Don't know if I'd go all in on the "sea mist blue" or whatever thay call it.

As strange as it is, I think the electronics in my Ibanez' may be a bit better than the straight up all Fishman system in the Sonoran. My Fender went through a couple of batteries seemingly way too soon, and others have mentioned short battery life as well.

The guitar sounds good, has a solid top, and favors a bright Fender tonal philosophy.

The sound board on mine is a bit puffy, and I would like to have a bit more saddle sticking above the bridge. With that said, the guitar is set up fine, it plays well, but I'm still in the process of finding its perfect strings.

Because of the soundboard issue, I backed the string set down to "custom light", (.011 to .052) to shave off a few pounds of tension.

The Fender is a nice size guitar, a smallish dreadnought. (That probably sounds like an oxymoron) But, Fender calls it a "tight dreadnought", and the body is a fair amount smaller than my Crafter 12 string, and its a dread also. (But, the Crafter's case is larger than the aftermarket dread case I bought for the Sonoran. (Whatever that means)).

I know the LH Sonoran is pricier than the RH model, and pricier than a low end Talman.

Couple of things. I especially wouldn't buy a Sonoran if it wasn't electrified. That's from a styling standpoint, as well as my normal prejudice against acoustic only guitars. That Strat headstock look is just too hard to pull off without a cutaway.

In any event, there are solid top Fenders w/mahogany necks less pricey than the Sonoran. That brings the question, would you prefer their sound better, or would you pay for the kitsch factor, and some extra brightness the Sonoran presents.

I'm locked in to certain models because of left handed availability, but you aren't.

If I were going to step into this price range, I'd listen to the solid top Fenders, and Takamine and Yamaha models at competing price points.

So, when all is said and done, I'm happy with my Sonoran, but I'm not touting it as the alpha and omega of AE guitars.

I will say I think it sounds way better than your basic Ibanez AEF18 model, which is all lam, and which is definitely better than a Talman as well.

Hope this helps.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 28, 2013,
Captaincranky
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#29
Quote by patticake
proving once again that everyone has their own preferences. the gibson jackson browne makes my personal list as one of the very best sounding guitars i've ever played.
You could practically use the body of that guitar for a hot tub, couldn't you?
stepchildusmc
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#30
yep, tried 2 j-45's standard and a custom. they just ddn't click with me. they didn't have the jackson browne model. i just brought up my experience as an example of subjectivity. i knew patti thought very highly of them( expecially the JB) but, i just put them down and went back to trying out the rest.
nice review BTW cranky. i woulda really enjoyed the " i spent my money on it, so i couldn't be wrong" version but oh well....
NVDT
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#31
Thanks a lot cranky for having taken the time to write out that in-depth review .
NVDT
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#32
Also I noticed for this particular one that the "natural" Sonoran is more expensive than the "colored" Sonorans ( they have the most amazing names by the way, Lake Placid Blue ).
Is the natural one a "color" too and just more expensive to apply/more in demand ?

I thought that "not having a color" would spare them the man hours of "applying the coating" to get a color, thus making the guitar cheaper, or am I totally wrong on how these are made ?
stepchildusmc
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#33
hmm... good question..... just checked... ZZounds has them all at the same price.
having swam in Lake Placid recently, i can tell you it ain't the same color ! odd trivia.. the town of Lake Placid sits on Lake flower and Lake placid is outside of town.... go figure.
patticake
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#34
blue and natural are the same price at guitar center
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Fender-Sonoran-SCE-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-107601619-i2247302.gc?source=4WWRWXGP&kpid=107601619'

they probably spray the color in a booth in seconds - the finish does. it may even go on instead of a couple layers of clear finish. the only finish i know of that's fully hand applied except by small builders is french polish, which wouldn't be used by fender as it's time intensive and also more fragile than poly finishes.

Quote by Captaincranky
You could practically use the body of that guitar for a hot tub, couldn't you?


it is just a wee bit deep, isn't it?
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
Last edited by patticake at Mar 28, 2013,
NVDT
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#35
Oh ok it's just banking on demand/availability by my shop then, thought there was some hidden guitar lore behind it
Captaincranky
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#36
Quote by NVDT
Oh ok it's just banking on demand/availability by my shop then, thought there was some hidden guitar lore behind it
Sort of, but not really. The Sonoran went through a "Sonoran > Sonoran II" morph, and a price increase. AFAIK, the pricing anomalies are due to new / old inventory dealer costs.

When I bought mine, M'sF had it listed TWICE on the page. Once at $389.95 and again at 429.95! I called and ordered the $389.95 version, (seemed to make sense), and got all the features advertised for the higher price model.

If you think about, you need better quality wood and veneers to pull off a natural finish, than you do when you paint something. I don't think that's the issue here, but it is a truth you have to deal with in all phases of woodwork in general.

Anyhow, I left out the issue of the 6 in line tuners on the Sonoran. These are repro 60's tuners, they aren't adjustable, and don't have the same bolt pattern as the six singles you might consider buying to replace them. (one day in the future, of course).

It's not really an issue, (or is it), but these tuners are 14:1 ratio, down from the more common 16:1 to 18:1 available nowadays.

And you're welcome for the review.

Quote by patticake
they probably spray the color in a booth in seconds - the finish does. it may even go on instead of a couple layers of clear finish. the only finish i know of that's fully hand applied except by small builders is french polish, which wouldn't be used by fender as it's time intensive and also more fragile than poly finishes.

The Sonoran's paint job is listed as polyester (!), not polyurethane.

I suspect that these types of finishes fall pretty much in line with automotive protocols. On an auto, that would be a 3 stage paint job, primer, color base coat, clear coat final.

In the guitar's case, the primer would be omitted, since wood has a higher natural adhesion than metal. So then, base color, then clear for the colored models, just clear for the natural.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 28, 2013,
NVDT
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#37
Quote by patticake
proving once again that everyone has their own preferences. the gibson jackson browne makes my personal list as one of the very best sounding guitars i've ever played. and i love the sound of just about any j-45 or gibson jumbo. i don't like the hummingbird, though, and am underwhelmed by some of their smaller guitars, however.

the sonoran definitely sounds better than the talman. given the choice, i would go for the sonoran. it's got a bigger, more resonant body, a solid top and a maple neck - i find adding that brightness from the maple helps fight the boxiness of the laminate back and sides.


The Epiphone EJ200(CE) is on the list too (It's my ceiling price, most expensive guitar I'll maybe try), and from what I have read it's Epiphone's version of the Gibson J200 ( And it's a jumbo model from what I see), kinda looks like the Hummingbird. Anyone has hands-on feedback on this particular model ?
Listened to this gentleman talking about it (youtube.com/watch?v=J6qy-nGbHyA), seems alright.
It's a tad bigger than the Sonoran's Dread body if I understood correctly ?
Imma hop down to the store next week ( It's far away that's why I plan so carefully what to try when I'm there and what not to try )
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Last edited by NVDT at Apr 1, 2013,
MikeRider
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2012
190 IQ
#38
Hey there ... i played the Talman E-Acoustic and really dont like the sound of it - unplugged it s like a tin-box ... too thin and not rich. Now i play the Fender T-Bucket and it sounds very great - even unplugged - a lot of benifit for this price !!!