jszair
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2013
32 IQ
#1
The simple "pick a note then bend to that note" exercise gets a little boring after while. Is there's any solo that incorporates a lot of bending and vibrato? I've seen people suggest Technical Difficulties for alternate picking practice. I wonder if there's one for bending.

And I'd love to know any other effective bending excise ideas.

Thanks!
Last edited by jszair at Mar 28, 2013,
ivan987
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Join date: Jun 2007
452 IQ
#2
Gary Moore's ballads - Still got the blues, Parisienne walkways, Loner. November rain is also quite useful to study because there are multiple bending techniques involved in that solo.
maximumrocker
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#3
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TheNameOfNoone
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#4
Take any solo you love and just add some bends to it.
Example: Metallica - Suicide And Redemption, the first, nice solo.
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nosuchmanasmole
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#5
joe bonamassa - any solo but i recomend sloe gin

any dave gilmour solo
AeonOptic
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#6
Clapton's solo in While My Guitar Gently weeps.
guitarturf
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Join date: Mar 2013
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#7
One thing I do sometimes is play 1 octave of the major scale on a single, bend-friendly, string (i.e. either the G, B, or E string). But, instead of playing the notes directly, start at the note immediately below the target note and then bend up to it (and add vibrato, if desired). Of course, the key is to make it sound like a scale.

You can mix it up by changing strings and starting on different notes. This exercise gives you good coverage across the neck and it gives you a good mix of halftone and wholetone bends.
Tempoe
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Join date: Oct 2008
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#8
Play a normal scale and bend each note to the next

edit yeah this^
llBlackenedll
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#9
It depends what you're going for here. If you're struggling with bending accuracy (as in, getting it to pitch then returning) you want to just do the normal bend up to the next scale degree thing. I recommend you do this with some kind of tuner sometimes just to assess your accuracy - sometimes you can think your bends are pretty accurate when really they're not.

If you're trying to improve general vibrato (as in, the feel of that vibrato) the best thing to do is to listen to some music, find a player whose vibrato most appeals to you, slow it down and try to copy it exactly. Do this for a few different artists and songs, and you'll eventually get the idea. Obviously you don't just want to be a copycat, but doing this will widen your vocabulary (so to speak).
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Hrvat
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Join date: Mar 2013
14 IQ
#11
Quote by ivan987
Gary Moore's ballads - Still got the blues, Parisienne walkways, Loner. November rain is also quite useful to study because there are multiple bending techniques involved in that solo.

+1 for Gary Moore.

Honestly, I never "practiced" bending (or vibrato). Just make sure that it sounds right when you do it, and it'll get into your memory. When I practiced my Zakk/Yngwie vibratos I just doodled a bit until I hit the right speed and overall sound, and after a few weeks it just got into my memory so I never have to think about it.

You'll hear if you don't bend a note to the right pitch, trust me.
llBlackenedll
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#12
Quote by Hrvat
You'll hear if you don't bend a note to the right pitch, trust me.

Not * necessarily* with vibrato, as vibrato is more about ensuring you return to pitch than anything.
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Hrvat
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#13
Quote by llBlackenedll
Not * necessarily* with vibrato, as vibrato is more about ensuring you return to pitch than anything.

True, but I was aiming more for the bends with that. Vibrato is, in my opinion, personal to the player. Someone plays them "nervously", someone furiously and so on... I like them precise, bent to the right pitch, sometimes fast and sometimes slow.

Bends can have more flavors, too! But I don't think anyone would like bending to the wrong pitch to be their signature technique.
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llBlackenedll
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#14
Quote by Hrvat
True, but I was aiming more for the bends with that. Vibrato is, in my opinion, personal to the player. Someone plays them "nervously", someone furiously and so on... I like them precise, bent to the right pitch, sometimes fast and sometimes slow.

Bends can have more flavors, too! But I don't think anyone would like bending to the wrong pitch to be their signature technique.

Heh no, that's true. Yeah there are so many different flavours of vibrato. I'm not too keen on thin and fast, although that can have it's place, however to me it usually sounds symptomatic of someone who has no control over their vibrato and just wants to wobble the string. Personally I think it's much harder to get a slow, consistent and accurate vibrato going than it is to get a fast vibrato going.
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