#1
Hey dudes. I'm currently trying to tighten up my playing in terms of playing with excellent technique and defining all notes clearly and cleanly. I was wondering if anyone had any tips on building stamina and dealing with right-arm fatigue when playing intense, fast riffs like the ones in this song:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WppG4IQy2g

This song is pretty challenging for the right hand more so than the left since it involves lots of fast picking and string skipping. I'm using guitar pro's speed training feature to slow the riffs down and practice them to the metronome, but what I'm noticing is that even at slower speeds I'm having to stop to rest pretty frequently, much more frequently than when I practice my left hand technique. This song is pretty short, but to play the entire thing through at full speed seems like it would burn my entire right arm up. Is there anything I can do to help, or do I just need to start slow and build up speed as my stamina increases?
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#2
keep your wrist as loose as possible and use the weight of your hand to do the picking for you. the picking motion should just be a little impulse to set the pick in motion.

easier said than done of course, but keeping that little detail in mind constantly improved my fast picking a lot.
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#3
Quote by vIsIbleNoIsE
keep your wrist as loose as possible and use the weight of your hand to do the picking for you. the picking motion should just be a little impulse to set the pick in motion.

easier said than done of course, but keeping that little detail in mind constantly improved my fast picking a lot.

I like this advice, personally I think it's much more important to keep your wrist loose than it is to focus on tiny movements as I believe focusing exclusively on tiny movements can promote tightness. Of course, you still want to minimise movement, but not at the expense of relaxation. You also want to make sure you're always getting good, clean hits not wimpy little quiet things that no one can hear, and to be able to control how hard you hit.

A little exercise I do which I find really helps with picking, articulation and timing is to shove on a metronome (at, say, 120bpm, basically whatever you're *very* comfortable playing at) then play quarters, then eighths, then eighth triplets, then sixteenths, then quintuplets, then sextuplets then if I'm really feeling up to it, septuplets. Do it with the same note, and always accent the beat with a harder hit.
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Last edited by llBlackenedll at Mar 29, 2013,
#4
I'm typically more of a rhythm guitar player, so I still have some trouble with right hand fast-picking fatigue, even even 16 years of playing or so.

I think it's just one of those things where the more you do it, the easier it'll get. I'd also agree that relaxing your wrists and not "pushing" the strings can really make a difference.
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