Dreadnought
Oceanic Mountainman
Join date: Sep 2002
5,196 IQ
#2
Yah, all Fs are sharped in that instance.
But we little know until tried how much of the uncontrollable there is in us, urging across glaciers and torrents, and up dangerous heights, let the judgment forbid as it may.
stealthpumpkin
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2012
38 IQ
#3
Yes, the key signature is that first part of the line. The first part (the big S) signifies you are in treble clef, the next part tells you the time signature, Since there is nothing there, you can assume it's in standard time 4/4 which means you go "1, 2, 3, 4; 1, 2, 3, 4". After that you have the sharps and flats, this tells you what key the piece is in; meaning that those sharp notes, or those flat notes will be consistent throughout the song. The only exception is when a sharp, flat, or natural is explicitly stated before a note begins.
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
288 IQ
#4
Quote by stealthpumpkin
.The only exception is when a sharp, flat, or natural is explicitly stated before a note begins.
I think an "incidental" sharp or flat, holds true for an entire measure. So, if say a "C" was marked sharp, if a "C" occurred within the same measure it would be sharp also. If you wanted a natural C within the same measure, you would need to put a "natural sign in front of it.

You might want to check on that, as it's been quite a while since I studied music....
stealthpumpkin
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2012
38 IQ
#5
Quote by Captaincranky
I think an "incidental" sharp or flat, holds true for an entire measure. So, if say a "C" was marked sharp, if a "C" occurred within the same measure it would be sharp also. If you wanted a natural C within the same measure, you would need to put a "natural sign in front of it.

You might want to check on that, as it's been quite a while since I studied music....


It's called an accidental, yes they do hold throughout a bar.