#1
Hey guys I've recently turned my shed into a home recording studio. It obviously will be very modest given the amount of money I can spend on it! I was wondering what are the essential things I need in the studio in order to make it acoustically treated and what I should get in terms of equipment. I was looking into making so DIY bass traps with the fiberglass ( which is not entirely recommended but I've read that they actually do a decent job ) I was also going to put a rug on the floor and maybe a couple of blankets on the wall to recreate something similar to Andrew Stockdale's "Shed Sessions". I know nothing about diffusers and all that fancy stuff, or if it's possible to make them. where to place them etc. Finally I was also wondering what I should buy as equipment? I have a Focusrite Saffire 6 USB which does the job, but I was thinking I could possible upgrade to the Focusrite Octopre Mk II? In terms of mic I have a 57 and a 58 ( of course ) and a couple of amps/ guitars and midi keyboards. In terms of drums I have nothing yet, I was looking into buying an electronic one because it's so easier to record and so versatile. Anyway I just wanted to know what are the essentials and in which direction I should go in terms of priorities "building vs equipment" and all!

Thanks in advance!
#2
No need to upgrade the interface unless you're planning on recording acoustic drums any time soon. The one thing you seem to be missing is a decent vocal mic though. That should probably be on the list of things to buy as well as some studio monitors.
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...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#3
+1 for a good condenser and some good monitors.

other than that, you should be good. depending on what DAW you're using, you may want to spend some money on some plugins, especially if you're gonna be recording off of a midi kit, so maybe Superior Drummer or Addictive Drums or something similar, because chances are they'll be a lot better than the built in sounds on an electric kit
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#4
Is this shed in the middle of a field? I can't imagine how you expect to stop the neighbours complaining otherwise. A couple of blankets and a rug will do fine acoustically. Electronic drums essential for since acoustic ones too loud unless answer to question 1 is yes. Advise you also to make a speaker box in a box for recording electric guitar. 57 and 58 are ok for basic recording but you need some other mics. At least one each of a small diaphram condenser and a large one too.
#5
In terms of DAW I have Ableton and some Native Instruments plug-ins like the B4II, Abbey Road Drummer and Guitar Rig 5! I have no clue about monitors and vocal mics? I thought the 58 was fine?
#6
In some situations yes.

But not in most. It's a live mic first and foremost. It'll work great on some voices sure, but for a great vocal take a condenser is best.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#7
Dude drive in and upgrade when you FIND issues,... Much cheaper then trying to upgrade to what you "Might" find.. any Band will be happy to give you a break and play again next weekend , IF you give them a Break in Price $$.
#8
How big is this shed?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Quote by axemanchris
How big is this shed?

CT


I think it's somewhere around 150 sq feet! I'd have to measure it this weekend
#10
First priorities should be a good vocal mic (some kind of large diaphragm condenser is a safe bet), sound treatment (because a shed is gonna have some shitty ass reverb), then if you're planning on mixing stuff yourself get some monitors. If you still have cash to burn after that then you can start looking at electric drum kits and whatnot
#11
Quote by chatterbox272
First priorities should be a good vocal mic (some kind of large diaphragm condenser is a safe bet), sound treatment (because a shed is gonna have some shitty ass reverb), then if you're planning on mixing stuff yourself get some monitors. If you still have cash to burn after that then you can start looking at electric drum kits and whatnot


Speaking of drums I just acquired the Yamaha DTX500k today actually, for mixing I think I'll use some headphones for now and I'm not sure which vocal mic I should get? I saw that the Rode NT1-A had some nice reviews any thoughts?
#12
-Studio Monitors
-basic music equipment [Guitars, drums, bass, mics] Depending on what type of music you want to make.
-Condenser mics
-Software [Presonus's Studio one or Pro Tools]
-Audio interface
-Cables
-Computer
#14
Quote by Cavalcade
lol


Pffft every one knows they are THE ONLY two choices
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#15
So, 10 x 15 or something then?

What about security? I don't know too many people who have had their home or apartment broken into, but sheds get broken into all the time. Mostly because the best you can do is a padlock to secure a less-than-robust door in a temporary structure.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.