#1
Hey, I'm the vocalist for the band I'm in that me and my guitarist run. I have a very good range in vocals for a Baritone. I like to sing more higher pitched, but every once in a while, I'll sing deeper-pitched stuff. I sing to mainly Breaking Benjamin, Tool, and APC.

Now, question, I have trouble reaching for certain notes. Either because I'm sick or I don't feel confident enough to reach that high because I think my voice is going to crack. Any advice on how to increase that range? Like, I'm so damn close to that higher note, but I still can't sing it. Any experienced vocalists here that can give me advice on how to increase your range? I know you can't dramatically increase your range, it's baby steps, but what do you guys do to increase it?
#2
What i did to increase range was push my voice, punch on those high notes a few times, then slowly go higher, took me a few weeks to hit the notes i wanted.
It`s not a pro tip, i was just singing random stuff, did Death Metal vocals at the same time, so don`t trust that it`ll work for you the way it did for me.
#3
Well, I sing Hard Rock and Metal so I'm at the same line as you. I personally don't like singing to all the Classic Rock my friend suggests me to because they're too easy to sing and are boring for me.
#4
I used to do vocals in an old band and there was just one song I couldn't hit 1 note in. I basically just kept trying until I could eventually hit it, then it eventually because pretty comfortable to hit.

Just keep trying and like you said, it's baby steps and may take a while, might be quick, everybody's different. Just power through everything confidence related and be proud of looking like a moron if that's how you feel you will look trying to do it.

Oh and if it hurts or you feel you are straining too much, lay back a bit. Usually an obvious thing but it's always better to throw that out there, don't want any injury's now do we.
When I was eleven I broke the patio window and my mother sued me... She's always been a very aggressive litigator.
#5
I'm going to play devil's advocate here and suggest that you stick to your natural vocal range. Whilst many musicians can train themselves to hit high notes, there's a reason it's called 'Falsetto'; because 9 times out of 10 it sounds incredibly 'False', it does not sound like the voice of the singer. Many people can tell you how to change and fake your voice, but unfortunatly the secrets of finding a high range that utilises your natural 'voice' are elusive. Practice and practice some more by all means, but I would not suggest 'training' your voice, because it can severely lose personality as a result. I hope you do find that high-range your looking for, and I hope you can keep your god-given voice in the process.
#6
Trained singer here.

First advice: find a singing tutor. If this is outside your budget, then here are some general pointers...

Preparation. The high note you're trying to get will not happen if you don't prepare for it; my singing teacher used to remind me time and time again that if you miss a note it's invariably because of how you sang the previous one — it's a little like F1 cars taking corners. They have to exit the previous corner to take the next one properly. This preparation is done in a few ways...

1] Breathing. Make sure you're not running out of breath. When you take breaths, make sure you're emptying your lungs first, or you'll never fully oxygenate and you'll end up feeling like you're permanently running on empty.

2] Breath control. All singing is powered by the controlled expulsion of air, and this is done using the diaphragm, the muscle that lies underneath your ribcage. This muscle is fortified and supported by the muscles of the abdominal walls: if you tighten your stomach muscles, these are the ones you need to be using. Ideally, these stay not tensed but merely... active. It's difficult to explain. It shouldn't feel like you're forcing a dump, but it shouldn't be loose and sagging either. Use these muscles, with your diaphragm, to control and steady the flow of air as you exhale during singing.

3] Warm-ups. This is important; don't believe it's not. Rising scales are good; arpeggios are good. I often suggest an arpeggio on the way up followed immediately by a falling scale. Focus on the top notes of the scales, and concentrate on the vocal production. You want rounded, clean notes, without straining. This leads me onto...

4] Phrasing. Phrasing is INCREDIBLY important. If you look at vocal passages as phrases, identify points of interest, and move from one to the other in a lyrical fashion rather than thinking of it as just a collection of notes, high notes come much easier because your body unconsciously prepares you for them. Set up your breathing to take you through phrases comfortably, then breathe out naturally, keeping the stomach muscles supported, inhale as if the air was 'falling' into you, and begin the next phrase. Always breathe a heartbeat in advance.

A few more tips: if your throat feels 'tight', your technique is bad. You're probably straining; ease off a little. Volume should never be used as a kind of getaway car; it is no substitute for taking time to train, and will ruin the voice. If you can't hit the note at a comfortable, singing-in-your-bedroom volume, then don't try at high volume. You'll probably get it, but it's not good for you.

Keep, as much as possible, your throat relaxed. Visualise high notes as coming out the top of your head, and imaging yourself projecting them like that.

Sing every day and, when you do, don't just sing like you would in the shower. Pay attention to what you're doing, how it feels, and try to work out what works and what doesn't.

Hope that helps, pal.

And to the fellow who advocates not training your voice... Well, I don't know what to say to that apart from the fact that it's a pretty narrow viewpoint.
Last edited by gl.tch at May 11, 2013,
#8
Quote by EqualOfHeaven
I'm going to play devil's advocate here and suggest that you stick to your natural vocal range. Whilst many musicians can train themselves to hit high notes, there's a reason it's called 'Falsetto'; because 9 times out of 10 it sounds incredibly 'False', it does not sound like the voice of the singer. Many people can tell you how to change and fake your voice, but unfortunatly the secrets of finding a high range that utilises your natural 'voice' are elusive. Practice and practice some more by all means, but I would not suggest 'training' your voice, because it can severely lose personality as a result. I hope you do find that high-range your looking for, and I hope you can keep your god-given voice in the process.

Well, I'm not exactly trying to imitate a vocalist. I'm just aiming to reach as high as them. I sing with my own style. And gl.tch, that's something I would definitely do. Thanks.