petar.dusk
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2013
21 IQ
#1
Electric guitars seem to be sturdier than acoustics.

So here I ask for stories (with pics if you'd like), describing what YOUR acoustic has gone through and survived.
Bikewer
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2010
65 IQ
#2
More durable.... Dunno... The combination of very heavy bodies and very skinny necks result in an awful lot of snapped-off headstocks and such on electrics. Not to mention all the little bits sticking out.
Acoustics are very light, in comparison, so can often survive falls without much damage.... Of course, the face is always susceptible to sharp impacts.
We know a fellow who had purchased a nice new Martin years ago and was playing on an East-coast beach , sitting on the sand under a boardwalk. He lay the guitar on the sand and some fool dropped a coke bottle from the boardwalk.
Neatly punched a round, coke-bottle sized hole in the face, just below the bridge....
The guy sanded the edges of the hole and played it for years with it's "extra" sound-hole.
GaryBillington
Last of a Dyin' Breed
Join date: Nov 2001
1,310 IQ
#3
I've had my acoustic at least 10 years now and I've played 100s of gigs with it. It's still in excellent condition.

Buy a good instrument & take good care of it, it will last forever.
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stonyman65
Unregistered User
Join date: Sep 2005
809 IQ
#4
As long as you don't let them dry out it should be okay.

Another thing to watch out for is the glue coming loose. On electrics, everything is usually screwed or bolted down. On an acoustic, it's usually glued on - if that glue happens to come loose it will ruin your day pretty quick.

And of course you'd want to avoid any serious hits or drops to it as well.
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Andalus
Bànned
Join date: Mar 2011
617 IQ
#5
Less durable than electrics, I would say. Of course, the bodies on electrics are - as another person said - a damnsight heavier than the necks, so if you drop it on the neck, kiss goodbye to your guitar. Anybody who knows guitars will know how to carry their electric though...

I'd always be worried about something punching through, the bodies have always felt weak to me. Like you could squeeze it and it'd snap.

I gig with electric though, not acoustic. So I couldn't really give you an accurate estimation of how durable they are, just an assumption based on my (limited) experience.
patticake
Acoustic Goddess
Join date: Jun 2009
2,886 IQ
#6
i'd say they're less durable than electrics. i've always taken care of my guitars, but a lot of my friends have snapped off headstocks, let their guitars get dry till the bodies cracked or the guitars were damaged in ways that wouldn't have damaged an electric body.

that being said, i've played a lot of acoustic guitars from before the 1940s - my husband owns 1936 kalamazoo, and i've played martins from the 1910s and 1920s, and seen lots more than i've played. most of them have had cracks that have been fixed, but they just keep on going...

but an electric guitar won't change in normal humidity changes which can crack an acoustic or make it sound lousy.
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Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
301 IQ
#7
Quote by patticake
i'd say they're less durable than electrics. ....{ }.....

....[ }.....but an electric guitar won't change in normal humidity changes which can crack an acoustic or make it sound lousy.
Yeah, you can pretty much leave a Les Paul sit out on a stand year round with little effect.

Disclaimer: Kids don't try this at home with your high dollar Taylor acoustic...
stepchildusmc
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2011
413 IQ
#8
there are acoustics that are much more durable than others. Ovations have a fiberglass or lyrachord(fancy fiberglass) back and sides which makes them a bit tougher. some even have carbon fiber tops..... damn near humidity-proof. there are also others that are made of completely carbon fiber, including the neck... Emerald. Blackbird, Rainsong and Carbon Acoustic to name a few. they tend to get a wee expensive though. hell, you could play in the shower with the Rainsong( wouldn't recommend doing that while plugged in - my disclaimer!)
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
301 IQ
#9
Quote by stepchildusmc
....[ ]....Emerald. Blackbird, Rainsong and Carbon Acoustic to name a few. they tend to get a wee expensive though. hell, you could play in the shower with the Rainsong( wouldn't recommend doing that while plugged in - my disclaimer!)
Meh, as long as the house is up to modern electrical codes and has GFI breakers, it might be worth a shot...... (Jus' kiddin')

Although some comedian on late night TV recently said he used to use a prop guitar in his routine. The guitar would leak water as he was playing, "While My Guitar Gently Weeps". (Yeah, I thought it was a bit corny myself).

Just for the sake of a bit more back story on the original question, an acoustic guitar has unfinished and asymmetrically finished surfaces. Humidity can enter or leave its interior surfaces pretty much as it chooses. Not so for the exterior which is finished, and that prohibits a gain or loss of moisture. So, differential humidity between the interior and exterior surfaces, are what leads to shrinking and swelling, and eventual cracking.

A solid body has NO interior surfaces, and a finished outer surface, which is what leads to its dimensional stability.

Now, I imagine you can run into a problem with respect to RH, when you're dealing with a semi-hollow design. Perhaps a Gibson ES, Guild "Starfire", or many Gretsch models.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 19, 2013,