NoTTD
Registered User
Join date: May 2013
135 IQ
#1
I am a newbie deluxe and am teaching myself so far. No problem fingering on chords but how do I determine which strum pattern applies to which song? (Please don't tell me to just listen. ) I've gotten into the bad habit of strumming them all the same. I use the tabs here for the chords, is there somewhere I can check which will show the correct patterns, by song?
stepchildusmc
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2011
413 IQ
#2
justinguitar.com has some decent trumming pattern lessons. i'd start there.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
triface
Drenched in Syrup
Join date: Jan 2010
1,210 IQ
#3
Honestly, I've never gotten the point of strumming patterns. I just listen to the recording to see what rhythm they're using.

IMO, unless you're in an ensemble where even your strumming counts as part of the visual aesthetic, it doesn't matter.

I am fully prepared to be proven wrong, however.
_LoveFuzz_
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2010
140 IQ
#4
Well, without the music notation, only chords, you really have no choice but to "just listen". Using tab pro or guitar pro could help with this - it provides notation.

Although there is a "pattern" to strumming that will work in a given section of a song, one could move their hand in any way they wish as long as the timing of the strums is correct. For instance I could hold an open E chord and just strum quarter notes 1 2 3 4 or I could do the same but move my hand in a 16th note rhythm but only strum the first note of every 16th note bar 1 (2 3 4) 2 (2 3 4) 3 (2 3 4) 4 (2 3 4) - the numbers in parenthesis are just moving you hand in time, not hitting the strings. In both cases I would play the same thing although the "pattern" is different.

So thinking in terms of pattern isn't really the right approach, learn timing or more specifically note values.
Last edited by _LoveFuzz_ at Jun 7, 2013,
Wetstra
One Angry German
Join date: Sep 2012
142 IQ
#5
Honestly, I've never gotten the point of strumming patterns. I just listen to the recording to see what rhythm they're using.

IMO, unless you're in an ensemble where even your strumming counts as part of the visual aesthetic, it doesn't matter.

I am fully prepared to be proven wrong, however.


^this. Strum patterns are just myths, they don't matter unless, as tri said, visuals are important to the show.
If I could get THAT sound out of a Casio Mickey Mouse watch, I would play a Casio Mickey Mouse watch
NoTTD
Registered User
Join date: May 2013
135 IQ
#6
Great stuff, and thanks to everybody.

Justinguitar.com looks particularly promising.
Last edited by NoTTD at Jun 13, 2013,
BenTunessence
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2013
21 IQ
#7
Hey NoTTD!

Typically strumming follows the beat: strum down on the down beat, and up on the upbeat. The beat is usually the quarter note or eighth note.

Learning strumming patterns is really just a way to get your hand synced up with the feeling of the beat to the point where your strumming arm becomes like a metronome. Then it's easy to pick up the strumming to a song by ear.

You could start by just taking a typical 4-beat measure and strumming all of the down and up beats:

Down-Up, Down-Up, Down-Up, Down-Up

Then try missing the strings on purpose in different places to create some rhythmic variation. Make sure your arm keeps swinging with the beat, though.

For example:

Down-Up, Down-Up, (down miss)-Up, Down-Up

Down-(up miss), Down-(up miss), Down-Up, Down-(up miss)

Hope that helps!
Garry Edwards
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2013
11 IQ
#8
Hey NoTTD
It's all just about covered so, all you have to do is keep the beat with your "foot" and it'll come to you sooner than later. Practice, practice practice my friend.