MattMurph
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2013
188 IQ
#1
Ok guys, I need your help. I'm looking to buy my first mandolin. I The want one because they sound amazing, the smaller size will make it easier to transport than my guitar, the chords seem easy enough, and I'm prepared for the transition however hard or easy it may be.

I'm not sure where to start. I want to be able to pick up and play, so the acoustic / electric hybrid doesn't seem like its for me right now, unless the price is right. I'm looking to spend around $200. I can go beyond that, but I want to remain closer to $200 than $300. Since my guitar is a Yamaha F335, purchased at something like $200 at the time, and I am very satisfied with it, I figure that price is enough for a decent mandolin.

What should I know about the mandolin beforehand? What are some good brands? What exactly is the difference between an A style and an F style? Which would allow me to play more major scales? I'm not sure what I am asking. I basically just want a mandolin to use when playing with friends. Something that will stand out, whether it is the tone or octave I am playing, when I play with my like-minded friends, who usually also have guitars.

Any help is greatly appreciated!
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#2
If I were you I would just go down to your local Guitar Center and try some out. Otherwise, you probably won't see much quality difference between models at that price- point.
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will42
UG's bassoon-master
Join date: Aug 2010
1,093 IQ
#3
I prefer F mandolins, and most of the mandolinists I have met and know of (frank wakefield, buddy meriam, chris thile) all use Fbody mandolins. They use them because they have the larger resonation chamber, which gives you a bigger sound. Also, higher level mandolins are generally built to an F-body because of tradition. They also have a few extra frets but, take it from me, those notes are some high, and the tone is so pinched, that it barely makes a difference.
Strauss!
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absolutely what will said

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MattMurph
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2013
188 IQ
#4
It has recently occurred to me that it may be very hard to fingerpick on a mandolin. This is something I need to be able to do. Is this possible?
will42
UG's bassoon-master
Join date: Aug 2010
1,093 IQ
#5
I've never noticed any difficulty with it. Why would it be any different than a 12-string guitar?
Strauss!
"I am hitting my head against the walls, but the walls are giving way." - Gustav Mahler.

Quote by AeolianWolf
absolutely what will said

Yay, my first compliment!
AlanHB
Godin's Resident Groupie
Join date: Aug 2008
1,703 IQ
#6
Just off topic I have a 12 string mandolin. You fret 3 strings with each finger.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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MattMurph
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2013
188 IQ
#7
Quote by will42
I've never noticed any difficulty with it. Why would it be any different than a 12-string guitar?


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