#1
Does anyone here have any experience with the Presonus StudioOne DAW. I stumbled across the StudioLive digital mixer, that also works as an interface, which comes with StudioOne artist. So would I be able to make good quality recordings and mixes with just that program?
Note that if it is any good I will upgrade to the producer version, otherwise I'll get pro tools.
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#2
You'll indeed be able to get good mixes from that, too.

And, pro tools is actually the last thing I'd suggest you to upgrade to :P
I guess you'll choose what to buy when you'll be enough "pro" to understand the differences between all the DAWs.

Anyway stick to studio one for now, so you get to practice with a not that big but advanced tool
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#3
I hear it's really good I think you will get afew posts by fans on these forums

From the Protools user POV,- if you want a job in the industry go Protools

If you just want good recording software, use whatever you like and enjoy using it

you don't need to care about what anyone say's about Protools or any other software for that matter most DAW are the same level in 2013 so relax and find the workflow you like.
Last edited by T4D at Jun 27, 2013,
#4
StudioOne is great, but you gotta be careful which version you're using. Some of the cheaper versions are a little crippled, always worth checking out.
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#5
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You'll indeed be able to get good mixes from that, too.

And, pro tools is actually the last thing I'd suggest you to upgrade to :P
I guess you'll choose what to buy when you'll be enough "pro" to understand the differences between all the DAWs.

Anyway stick to studio one for now, so you get to practice with a not that big but advanced tool


I've actually studied sound engineering for two years, so I'd say I'm enough pro, we used pro tools and logic at school. I just haven't heard of anyone using studio one. But if the plug-ins are okay, so I can get a decent quality mix out of it, that's okay.

I will eventually upgrade to pro tools, sooner or later, but it's not a high priority investment if studio one is good.
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#6
The Studiolive mixers are nice kit....we wanted to pick one up but frankly I can't be arsed buying anything Firewire.

Studio One is one of the best DAWs out there, it's an absolute joy to use.


However I've been experimenting recently and decided to switch everything to REAPER...it's not quite as slick or intuitive as Studio One but it does a lot more for a lot less money.


The Artist version is junk, simple as. For tracking its fine (but you'd be better off using Presonus Capture for that anyway), but lack of support for third-party plugins makes it a complete waste of hard drive space IMHO.
Seriously, disabling third-party plugin support in a DAW that costs over £80 is a complete and utter dick move, and a major factor in my decisions not to buy a Studiolive and to run my company on Reaper instead of S1.

The lack of plugin organisation also drives me insane...


In terms of workflow I still think Studio One is one of the nicest DAWs out there, but I feel like the Reaper devs are far more deserving of your money - and their product is top-notch.


EDIT:

PS: AVID PRO TOOLS? More like AVOID PRO TOOLS!

PT is pricey as hell, unintuitive and horribly optimised, but in a big-studio environment it still makes a lot of sense since it's sold as an integrated system. It all fits together into a solid work environment and the audio editing tools are great. If you want to play with the big boys, you'll have to learn Pro Tools and Logic at some point.

For a small home/project studio, Pro Tools makes no sense whatsoever. It's outrageously expensive, has poor compatibility, performs horribly even on high-end hardware, and comes with tons of arbitrary restrictions on track count, plugins etc. Unless you're desperate to learn pro tools for your career, for the love of god buy something else.
Last edited by kyle62 at Jun 27, 2013,
#7
thanks Kyle. I'm quite sure I'll upgrade to the producer or professional version now. As for Pro Tools, it's the only DAW that I can handle at the moment. I've used logic a bit and a friend of mine has reason. But I've pretty much used PT for 2 years straight at school, and I really like working with it as well. If it wasn't so expensive, I wouldn't even consider getting something else instead.
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#8
The student version of Presonus Studio One Pro 2.5 is $199 USD. It's nice. I like the instruments and synths and loops it comes with. Melodyne is nice but it's limited because it's not a full version. The project page for mastering and making CD's is awesome. If you have an internet connection you can upload directly to soundcloud. My production pc doesn't have internet so I just use a flash drive.

I'm used to REAPER so the transition is still rough but I like it. My only real complaint so far, and it's a big one, is that you can't undo actions to the mixer. If you move a track or edit something in the edit window you can undo it. But if you change a preset or a setting or volume or mute/solo, you can't undo it. That doesn't make any sense to me actually and it's slowed me down because I rely on undo heavily in REAPER. Now I just have to be really careful and if I like a setting in a plugin, I save it as a preset, sometimes to a temp preset just for that purpose. When it comes to getting levels with mixing, I use automation to get what I want so if I mess it up I can undo it (automation is undo-able).

So yeah.
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#9
In my opinion, you'd be better off with logic if you want to spend $200.

You get the full version (which is a hell of a workstation, if you ask me) which includes the program, about 20GB of stereo samples and loops (I don't really know how heavy the surround samples are), 10 virtual instruments if I remember well, about 40 effect plugins, and you can use AU plugins.

It's also better looking if you ask me :P
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#10
^+1, that is, if you have a Mac.

I own Studio One 2 Pro. IMO, it has some of the best built in plugins in any DAW, with presets that are actually very good. It's integration with Melodyne is awesome, and its mastering suite is great. That being said, I always hear people saying its really intuitive to use. I've used every major DAW there is, and out of all of them S1 is the one I understand the least

If you do decide you like it, wait till one of the billions of sales they have a year and upgrade to pro for $99. Assuming you're still a student, you could also get Pro Tools 10 and 11 for ~$300, last I checked, which might be a better option since that's what you're used to.
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#11
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In my opinion, you'd be better off with logic if you want to spend $200.

You get the full version (which is a hell of a workstation, if you ask me) which includes the program, about 20GB of stereo samples and loops (I don't really know how heavy the surround samples are), 10 virtual instruments if I remember well, about 40 effect plugins, and you can use AU plugins.

It's also better looking if you ask me :P

1) You have to use a highly overpriced, locked-down computer to run it

2) AU plugins aren't really a benefit - there are far more free and paid plugins available for Windows than there are Mac.

3) Studio One comes with a similar amount of samples, virtual instruments etc. All of the 'big name' DAWs do. In fact, S1 even comes with Melodyne.

4) Logic is no longer being developed, it's basically been abandoned by Apple. Studio One, Reaper etc receive regular content and performance updates.
#12
Quote by kyle62
1) You have to use a highly overpriced, locked-down computer to run it

2) AU plugins aren't really a benefit - there are far more free and paid plugins available for Windows than there are Mac.

3) Studio One comes with a similar amount of samples, virtual instruments etc. All of the 'big name' DAWs do. In fact, S1 even comes with Melodyne.

4) Logic is no longer being developed, it's basically been abandoned by Apple. Studio One, Reaper etc receive regular content and performance updates.


Well I guess he will not buy a cmoputer just to run a program unless he knows what he's going for, and he has the money.

Given the fact that he wants to spend as low money as possible, buying logic would be a better idea in my opinion because I like it more than S1, and it has all that good stuff I explained, for the price of the student edition of S1.

The AU thing was meant to mean that it supports third party plugins, and the windows thing works if the alternative is windows.
Maybe he would use a mac anyway.

Logic is the one which comes with the biggest sampled instruments/synths quantity.

Also, why do you say Apple dropped it?
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#13
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4) Logic is no longer being developed, it's basically been abandoned by Apple. Studio One, Reaper etc receive regular content and performance updates.

Since when?

Speculation has been that Logic Pro X would come out within the next few months, to coincide with the Haswell-based Macs and the new Mac Pro. I'd find it very hard to believe that they're dropping development on Logic - Most music engineering programs teach both Pro Tools and Logic. They'd be losing a lot of customers, and frankly - Really the only reason musicians have for buying a Mac
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#14
Quote by kyle62
2) AU plugins aren't really a benefit - there are far more free and paid plugins available for Windows than there are Mac.

I completely agree with this, being a logic user.

4) Logic is no longer being developed, it's basically been abandoned by Apple. Studio One, Reaper etc receive regular content and performance updates.

I don't quite agree with this. Logic is being developed, but development has been very lacking. It's mainly been improved stability and bug fixes.
Logic X is still coming out, pretty sure it was confirmed by the company a little while back.

However, it is outdated imo.
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#15
So what do you guys think about Ableton Live (9).

9 has audio -> midi converter that works pretty well.

I can record chords on guitar, and then convert it to a midi note track to use it with a pad or synth sound or w/e.

You can also put in a complete song, and convert it in 2 clicks, so that the entire drums of the song are isolated and map as a new midi note track too use in a drum machine.

Also what the guy said about REAPER editing, in live almost everything is un-doable, and automation can be tracked and overdubbed in real time.

The workflow once used to it is so fast and optimized, and if you rely heavily between working with midi and raw audio I can hardly see any DAW being better at the moment.

Which is funny since I disliked it a few years ago

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jul 2, 2013,
#16
Logic has better midi editing, but if you don't have a machine to fun mac os x on, I'd say live's your best choice

And the problem of free audio units is not about audio units, it's about os.
Free stuff doesn't usually come in mac vst either.
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#17
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Well I guess he will not buy a cmoputer just to run a program unless he knows what he's going for, and he has the money.

Given the fact that he wants to spend as low money as possible, buying logic would be a better idea

If you want to spend as little money as possible, building a PC with Linux running Ardour is the best option. Or for a little more, Windows and REAPER.

Since Apple computers are generally 2 or 3 times more expensive than an equivalent Windows/Linux system, unless you already own one Logic would never be my choice where budget is concerned. Never mind the fact that logic costs £140 while Reaper offers a similar feature set for under £40.


Don't get me wrong; this is not an anti-Apple rant. I personally despise the company but I understand why a lot of people use their products.

This is an industry where we'll happily cough up £3000 for an analog compressor even though a free plugin can perform the same task to a similar standard....so it would be hypocritical to criticise someone for doing the same thing with computers!
If you can afford it, anything that improves your workflow and helps you make music more easily should be welcomed. For many people that might be racks of vintage outboard, for some it's a high-priced MIDI controller, for others it's an alternative operating system.

However, as soon as 'value' or 'budget' is mentioned, Apple becomes a less appealing choice...