DBKGUITAR
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2013
618 IQ
#1
Hello I've been playing guitar for around 1 year, and I learned the basic things of major and minor scales like how they are formed, their chords, how the three types of minor scales are formed... Also what accidentals use in each scale, how each chord was formed (minor major 7's 9's and 13's) you now the basic stuff...

With so I learned things about the intervals and how they are formed and I recently started to train my ear skills to detect those intervals (so far I got the V, IV, III, II from tonic).

I also learned the mode shapes with some help of youtube instructors like Marty or Justin and the 5 shapes of the pentatonics. I started to train sweep picking and tapping, my speed and accuracy with some alternate picking. I also began to train legato picking.

During this last weeks while I learned the mode shapes, I tried to understand them, so I made a thread asking something that I didn't understand. We arrived to the conclussion, that I should learn more about the major and minor scales.

Here is the thread
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1607099&page=1&pp=20

I'm confused, what should I learn next, what they mean to learn more the major and minor scales? Please guide me
MattyBoy 1337
Registered Re-user
Join date: Aug 2009
21 IQ
#2
There is only one major scale that is important. The major scale. there is only one minor scale that is important. The natural minor scale. Once you can make the diatonic chords from these scales (up to the 13, as you apparently can), then learn about functional harmony. Remember what I said in the last thread? More scales will not help you. If you are verbose with the major and minor ones, you're pretty much set on scales. Learn how to make music.
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone
Nietsche
Registered Hoover
Join date: May 2009
386 IQ
#3
Logically the next step would be to learn about inversions, voice leading and root movement.

Quote by MattyBoy 1337
there is only one minor scale that is important. The natural minor scale.


This isn't true in the slightest.

Once you can make the diatonic chords from these scales (up to the 13


You only need to be able to form triads to learn the basic principles of voice leading.

EDIT: Can I just add that telling a beginner to just go and learn functional harmony is really vague and not particularly helpful. You're not the only one who seems to be obsessed with doing that lately though. Sometimes I get the disturbing feeling that most of the people who discuss music theory on here have never read anything outside the forum. It would explain some of the weird memes that seem to pop up and now and again.
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Last edited by Nietsche at Jun 27, 2013,
Benjabenja
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2008
426 IQ
#4
Next up I'd recommend learning about common progressions and song structures. Then you could have a look into basic SATB writing and modulations.

Quote by Nietsche
Sometimes I get the disturbing feeling that most of the people who discuss music theory on here have never read anything outside the forum. It would explain some of the weird memes that seem to pop up and now and again.

Just the forums obsession with modes proves this...
Quote by MoogleRancha

You sir, are a genius.

I salute you.

Quote by iwontwait
The bestowing of this thread on my life is yours. Thank you, Benjabenja.
Ignore
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2012
799 IQ
#6
learn songs and write songs. Analyze what your doing on the side, for the theoretic aspect. But Learn music and MAKE music
Erc
UG's ultimate asshole
Join date: Jun 2005
670 IQ
#8
I find that most theory is useful for creating what I like to call jamming paradigms (a predictable atmosphere of chord progressions). Otherwise work on other things like songwriting, improv, or more ear training (playing things that you hear in your head or hear elsewhere.)