adrienfr
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2013
30 IQ
#1
I'm switching from years of acoustic to getting into electric guitar, and I keep running into this kind of two-note "chord" (or dyad) in a lot of rock songs:


E|--13----------------13----------------13----------------14-13-------------|
B|--14----14--14--14--14----14--14--14--14----14--14----14--------14-14--14-|
G|-----13-13--13--13-----13-13--13--13-----13-13--13--13--------13---13--13-|
D|--------------------------------------------------------------------------|
A|--------------------------------------------------------------------------|
E|--------------------------------------------------------------------------|


I understand that power chords are normally played as two strings separated by a fifth (usually with the root on the 6th or 5th), but I'm confused by these dyads played on treble strings.

My main question is how exactly are these strummed? Do you fret the two strings, mute the rest (perhaps by laying your hand/another finger over them) and then strum away? I'm trying to figure this out by comparing it to the sound of the record, of course, but it's hard sometimes when you're only hearing the final mix and all the production polish.

I've never really seen these two-note treble chords explained anywhere, and I'm not even sure what to call them. I'd really love to get more general information on what exactly they are and how exactly they're played. Thanks!

(This particular example is from Bloc Party's "Song for Clay", but I've seen it in plenty of other songs so please consider this a general question, not a song-specific one.)
Last edited by adrienfr at Aug 23, 2013,
Wrst_Plyr_Evr
UG's resident ska kid
Join date: Feb 2007
129 IQ
#2
I don't exactly know what they're called but I've always just called them Double Stops.

As far as playing them it's kind of up to you. If it's sounds like it's a full-on strum then strum away with the muting thing you were talk about. But I would personally just play them all with downstrokes.
GS LEAD 5
Registered User
Join date: Oct 2007
390 IQ
#3
The first one is a root and a major third.
The second one is a root and a perfect fourth.

The're still chords however, my knowledge of chords is insufficient to identify the type.

And I would simply move my palm closer to the higher strings and play just the notes mentioned in the tab.

EDIT: And a powerchord remains a powerchord regardless of where you play it on the fretboard. If it has a root, a perfect fifth, (and maybe an octave) then it's a powerchord even if it's on the 22nd fret of the 2nd string.

Quote by Wrst_Plyr_Evr
I don't exactly know what they're called but I've always just called them Double Stops.

As far as playing them it's kind of up to you. If it's sounds like it's a full-on strum then strum away with the muting thing you were talk about. But I would personally just play them all with downstrokes.



Double stops are for bowed instruments like violins and cellos. For a guitar, anything with multiple notes on a single instrument would be a chord, except when using a harmonizer.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Aug 23, 2013,
Junior#1
Is SouTaicho Yamamoto-san
Join date: Oct 2007
71 IQ
#4
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Double stops are for bowed instruments like violins and cellos. For a guitar, anything with multiple notes on a single instrument would be a chord, except when using a harmonizer.

No. An actual chord has a minimum of 3 different notes. Anything with just 2 notes can be called either double stops or dyads. Both are technically correct. The term double stops was originally just for bowed instruments, but has since been used to describe 2-note "chords" with almost any string instrument, including guitar.

TS, as it's tabbed, only strum the strings that the notes are on. If there were x's or some other indication of a mute on the other strings, then you would strum all the strings involved.
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Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
GS LEAD 5
Registered User
Join date: Oct 2007
390 IQ
#5
Quote by Junior#1
No. An actual chord has a minimum of 3 different notes. Anything with just 2 notes can be called either double stops or dyads. Both are technically correct. The term double stops was originally just for bowed instruments, but has since been used to describe 2-note "chords" with almost any string instrument, including guitar.

TS, as it's tabbed, only strum the strings that the notes are on. If there were x's or some other indication of a mute on the other strings, then you would strum all the strings involved.


Ok, this is new to me correction accepted.
Dave_Mc
Chirp and Swirl
Join date: Mar 2005
440 IQ
#6
yeah they're double stops normally.

normally i'd just play them almost like lead guitar (i.e. trying to hit the particular strings needed) but it depends on the piece of music and how it sounds best, as Wrst_Plyr_Evr says (and I don't really play bloc party type stuff so that might be terrible advice on my part )
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