#1
As the current state of my Strat is broken, I've been forced to switch back to my Agile AL-2000, which isn't so bad. It sounds amazing and plays just the way I want it, and of course it is a cheaper knock-off, so maybe I had this problem coming to me.

All the strings are pretty much intonated, maybe only ever so slightly sharp, to the point that its not noticeable.

However, the G literally REFUSES to be intonated. I've tried almost everything I can think of. Right now, I have it intonated to be allllllll the way as far as it can go bridge-side, and
it's still incredibly sharp the moment you fret.

I tried octaving my A string open with the A note on the G, and my god it is bad.
It gets a bit better as you travel up the neck I believe, but I have to just forget about using the G for the first few frets, because I can't even blend it into what I play. Bad note every time.

Sometimes I tune the G string more flat so I can get more consistency, but then there goes the ability of using it open.

I've tried raising string height, and it may have helped, I'm not sure, but it was done on an older pair of strings and I just set it back to normal. I just now restrung it, and I'm right off the bat noticing the same issues.

I never got it professionally set-up, because it's good enough the way it is.
I was wondering if anyone had any extra ideas for me or had similar problems so that I can save myself some extra cash. I suppose it wouldn't be all too bad to get it professionally fixed, if they even can.
Guitars:
Agile AL - 3001
Fender Stratocaster HSS
Agile AL- 2000
Squier Stratocaster VII
Amps:
Vox AC30C2
Vox AC15C1 X
Peavey Vypyr 30 X
Line 6 Spider III 75 X
Peavey Blazer 158 X
#2
You may have a bad string. Try giving it a few good pulls as well. It may just need to be stretched.

Does it look like that string is sitting in the nut properly?

Is your neck relief correct? If not you could be battling that issue.
Last edited by D_M_I at Aug 29, 2013,
#3
Quote by D_M_I
You may have a bad string. Try giving it a few good pulls as well. It may just need to be stretched.

Does it look like that string is sitting in the nut properly?

Is your neck relief correct? If not you could be battling that issue.


It isn't the string, this has been ongoing for a while through many strings and gauges.

However I thought about neck relief and I might look more into it.
Guitars:
Agile AL - 3001
Fender Stratocaster HSS
Agile AL- 2000
Squier Stratocaster VII
Amps:
Vox AC30C2
Vox AC15C1 X
Peavey Vypyr 30 X
Line 6 Spider III 75 X
Peavey Blazer 158 X
#4
It sounds like your neck is too tense and it's bowing the first 4 or so frets just ruining the sound. I'd also suggest tweaking your action, as the strings may be so low that they're hitting the next fret up.

If it could be anything other than that, I'd have to say it's the nut. It could be filed down too much and extra deep
I am the crack in the wall, The eye in the sky.
I am the final slumber, The great divide.
I am the silence in madness, That lies to your face,
My woe is accepted, 'tis the end of your race.
#5
If the slot in the nut is cut too high, when you fret the string it will cause it to stretch and go sharp. If all of your strings are behaving this way it could be too high of action or too much neck relief, but given it is only one string I'd suspect the nut slot. Check the distance from the top of the first fret to the string. If it is more than the thickness of a guitar pick or match book cover you will want to cut the slot deeper.
#6
The G-string problem is pretty inherent to guitars in general. The first problem is that the frets on a guitar are mathematically spaced incorrectly. Technically, they should be fanned to create the proper intonations. Secondly, the problem also lies withing the G-string itself. The G should really be a wound string to acquire the proper tension for the length of the string. This is also why the G always goes out of tune first, especially when the strings start to age. Some guitars handle the difficulties of the G better than others.

There are ways to get around this problem, like many here have said, it could be a high nut slot, a bad or sub-par string or just a saddle adjustment. Another thing you can try is to change string guages. If you are using 8's or 9's, you are more likely to have this problem as the string guage is lower than what the guitar is spec'd for. Usually, a Les Paul type guitar is spec'd for 10's. Its the same theory of stringing up a 1/2 scale guitar. If you string it with 9's or 10's the intonation will never be right. Many people suggest stringing 1/2 scale guitars with 11's or higher to solve this problem. If you dont want a higher guage of strings on your guitar, you can try buying a single G-string of a higher guage and put it on with your normal size gauge strings.

You can also try using a wound G. Some string packages come with both a wound and unwound G string, so nothing lost if the wound doesnt work out for you. I believe that Dean Markley does this. Another thing you can do is buy a stack of G strings and go through them until you find the "sweet" one. Although impractical, it happens more than you might think.

The G-string intonation problem is very common and there are a lot of people talking about it on the internet. Try doing a Google search on the subject and see what other people have to say. You might find other solutions or gain some good insight into the problem.
Last edited by RobinTH at Aug 30, 2013,
#7
1. Set your saddles up per factory settings (in the setup guide at Fender.com)
2. Re-string the guitar.
3. Stretch out the strings. Play for an hour. Stretch the strings again.
4. Tune up half a step. Leave the guitar like this overnight to be sure the strings are stretched.
5. The next day, tune back down to E. Make minor adjustments as needed.
#8
I had the exact same problem on my Strat, Took it to a tech and turned out the nut was cut at a weird slope. Cost me £10 to get it fixed with a new set of strings.