_tim*
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2013
60 IQ
#1
Hey, i want to know, is it possible to find a Gibson Les Paul with 24 frets ? I can't find by myself. Maybe it doesn't exist, but why ?
jpnyc
Banned
Join date: Nov 2009
90 IQ
#2
Even if Gibson made a 24-fret Les Paul you wouldn’t be able to use the extra frets. Les Paul neck pockets are not good for playing the uppers frets. If you really want this get a custom 24-fret guitar with an accessible neck pocket.
T00DEEPBLUE
Boba FRETT
Join date: Oct 2010
260 IQ
#3
Because it's tradition to have 22 frets on an LP. ALso fret access would be a bitch with 24 frets. A more justifiable reason is that in order to make space for the extra frets, the neck pickup would have to be moved closer to the bridge, which would alter its sound.

But while the utility of 24 frets is nice, I would never use the utility. The highest note I'd ever need to reach is the 2nd octave, and that can be done quite easily on a 22 fret guitar just by bending at the 22nd.

However, the Epiphone Prophecy LP's and the MKH LP have 24 frets.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Dec 4, 2013,
Roc8995
Moderator
Join date: Nov 2005
250 IQ
#5
The Buckethead sig has 24 frets, I think there was one other that did too but I can't come up with it right now.

Mostly though Gibson doesn't cater to the market that wants 24 frets. They don't make a lot of models with Floyds and super thin neck profiles, either. It's just not their thing. Fender is similar.
_tim*
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2013
60 IQ
#6
Ok thanks for all the answers. ESP/LTP are not what i'm looking for, that's right. On all the les paul ive played, i find it very difficult to reach the 22nd fret, maybe I only need to practice with those guitars.
_tim*
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2013
60 IQ
#7
For me, the access to the 22nd fret is already a bitch on Les Paul. And sometimes, i need to play fast here, and it's really difficult for me. So i thought that with 24 frets it would be easier ^^
_tim*
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2013
60 IQ
#8
i already have one (Matthias Jabs Signature, awesome guitar), but like many other guitar players, i fell in love with the Gibson sound, so i was wondering if it was possible to have this sound with 24 frets.
Roc8995
Moderator
Join date: Nov 2005
250 IQ
#9
The Les Paul Axcess seems like what you're looking for, if the issue is just that you have problems with 22 instead of actually needing 24. They're quite expensive, though, not really a practical solution for most people.
_tim*
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2013
60 IQ
#10
I think "Expensive" is the right word concerning this guitar ! I dont have 3600€ to spend right now, and if i had it, i would probably not buy this one, but thanks for your help ! =)
jpnyc
Banned
Join date: Nov 2009
90 IQ
#11
Quote by _tim*
I think "Expensive" is the right word concerning this guitar ! I dont have 3600€ to spend right now, and if i had it, i would probably not buy this one, but thanks for your help ! =)


You can have a custom Les Paul copy made by Agile in Korea for much less than the cost of a Gibson:
http://www.rondomusic.com/customquote.html
dspellman
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
100 IQ
#12
I have a Gibson Axcess Custom -- it was a bit over $4K a few years ago. 22 frets, and upper fret access isn't bad (thanks to the more comfortable neck heel), but the curve of the cutaway still forces me to rotate my hand a bit to get to the upper frets.

I have an Agile AL-2000 Floyd and an AL-3100 Floyd. These come with 24 frets. Rather than moving the neck pickup toward the bridge, they've kept the neck pickup where it usually is, extended the neck about 3/4" (so that the 24th fret is at about the same position as where the 22nd fret would normally be) and then they've moved the bridge and the bridge pickup toward the neck pickup. That maintains the scale, leaves all 24 frets pretty much clear of the body and gives you pretty good access. In addition, the stubby horn on the Agile doesn't force me to rotate my hand as does the point on the Gibson. And in another interesting turn of events, the neck/body join on the AL-2000 (the cheapest one of the bunch at around $300) is "tilted" and offers just about the same comfort as the $4K Axcess.

Gibson's first ever 24-fret guitar was the L6S of the '70's. The body on these is about as thick as an SGs, which means that there's really not much "heel" where the body and neck come together, so you don't really have much of an issue with access at all. In addition, because the guitar itself is wider than an LP, the cutaway is wider, which means that you don't have to rotate your hand to get to the 24th fret. Very nice.

The Carvin CS (California Singlecut) comes in a 24-fret version (with all 24 available, none buried in the body), has a body that's thinner than a standard LP and a neck heel that's quite nicely smoothed down. And the cutaway seems to have more room as well. In all, a more comfortable guitar to play than the Gibson versions.

And finally, there's the Agile AL-3200 and the Agile-3XXX semi-customs. The 3200 is a neck-through guitar that has a Gibson Axcess-like neck heel and a great tummy cut. Unusually good sustain and comfort. If you order a semi-custom version, you can order it with 24 frets (including Stainless Steel if you prefer) and in a variety of optional scales, including 25.5", 27", 28.65" and 30". The stubby horn maintains great upper fret access.

There's no telling why Gibson itself doesn't have a 24-fret LP (leastways, I don't recall one that wasn't a baritone) on the roster.
dspellman
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
100 IQ
#13
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Because it's tradition to have 22 frets on an LP. ALso fret access would be a bitch with 24 frets. A more justifiable reason is that in order to make space for the extra frets, the neck pickup would have to be moved closer to the bridge, which would alter its sound.

But while the utility of 24 frets is nice, I would never use the utility. The highest note I'd ever need to reach is the 2nd octave, and that can be done quite easily on a 22 fret guitar just by bending at the 22nd.


As stated in my other post, 24 frets on an LP is very cool -- and you don't move the neck pickup. The neck pickup's sound isn't appreciably altered. The SG has had its neck pickup located the same amount of distance toward the bridge/bridge pickup since the very early '60's and no one really complains about the sound.

Having 24 frets on the guitar means that the 22 that YOU use would be much more available to you.
Preacher403
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2010
10 IQ
#14
An Epiphone Les Paul Prophecy has 24 frets. They basically moved the pickups and neck up a little to make access to the top frets much easier. I can actually get to the 24th fret a bit easier than the 22nd on a normal LP.
Blbmbr666
Doing a barrel roll!
Join date: Jul 2008
50 IQ
#16
Honestly the Epiphone Prophecy guitars are just worse versions of LTD EC's, in my opinion anyway.
LTD EC-1000 VB
Ibanez RG3EXFM1 (Dimarzio Mo' Joe in bridge, PAF Joe in neck, and Sperzels)
KFG Custom
Ibanez RG2550Z Galaxy White
Epiphone Thunderhorse Explorer

Marshall AVT 275
_tim*
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2013
60 IQ
#17
Plus they have EMG pickups, and it's not what i'm looking for, i want the Gibson Les Paul tone
Bob Sherwood
Registered User
Join date: Nov 2013
10 IQ
#19
Look at a PRS s2 custom 24. About $1400, 24 frets, American made. I have one. Great guitar!
Preacher403
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2010
10 IQ
#20
The Epiphone Prophecy GX's have Gibson 490R/498T pickups in them. Or replace the pickups with whatever you like. Doesn't change the 24 frets.
Not a Les Paul
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2009
10 IQ
#21
Personally, I'd just go buy something else with better access, and drop whatever pickups you want into it. One slab of mahogany doesn't sound a whole lot different from another.
2PtDescartes
Registered User
Join date: Oct 2012
10 IQ
#22
I have a Gibson Les Paul double-cutaway with 24 frets. They were only made in 97 and 98, maybe 99. It's a studio model, I've seen ones with trapezoids online though. They were made to compete with PRS.

http://ja.audiofanzine.com/lp-shaped-guitar/gibson/les-paul-series-les-paul-studio-dc/medias/pictures/a.play,m.304568.html

This one is the same sunburst as mine, I'm too lazy to take pictures. Chambered body, maple top. A single cutaway with 24 frets wouldn't make much sense.
samjbow
I am not a krusty krab.
Join date: Oct 2011
120 IQ
#23
Coming from someone who has played both I feel that ESP Eclipses don't feel like Les Pauls at all. As for sound, I've only played Eclipses with EMGs so I can't really give an accurate comparison as to how they would sound.
You'd probably do well to look into Agile - I've never played them but they certainly look Les Paul-ish, and they're too small a brand to have been sued by Gibson yet xD
dspellman
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
100 IQ
#24
Quote by 2PtDescartes
A single cutaway with 24 frets wouldn't make much sense.


...and of course it does make sense, and a lot of it.

I'm not sure why you'd think that, but there are a lot of us who play 24-fret singlecuts. And more companies who offer them these days. Gibson started in the early '70's with the L6S, but they've not been in front of things on purpose for 50 years. Which is why the OP is scratching his head looking for Gibson LP singlecut 24-fret guitars. While the DC might have a Les Paul sticker on it (Gibson has pasted it on semi-hollows, etc.), it's not what most would think of when "Les Paul" is mentioned.

Other companies have offered 24-fret single cuts and that's where those sales have gone.
_tim*
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2013
60 IQ
#25
But it's interesting, it seems that building only 22 frets guitars is kind of a tradition for Gibson. Even Explorers have only 22 frets, it's strange
2PtDescartes
Registered User
Join date: Oct 2012
10 IQ
#26
Quote by dspellman
...and of course it does make sense, and a lot of it.

I'm not sure why you'd think that, but there are a lot of us who play 24-fret singlecuts. And more companies who offer them these days. Gibson started in the early '70's with the L6S, but they've not been in front of things on purpose for 50 years. Which is why the OP is scratching his head looking for Gibson LP singlecut 24-fret guitars. While the DC might have a Les Paul sticker on it (Gibson has pasted it on semi-hollows, etc.), it's not what most would think of when "Les Paul" is mentioned.

Other companies have offered 24-fret single cuts and that's where those sales have gone.

The guy asked about 24 fret Gibson Les Pauls so I posted one. I wouldn't really think of a L6S as a Les Paul, a Les Paul DC I would however. You're right though, OP should get an ESP or an Epiphone.
dspellman
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
100 IQ
#27
Quote by 2PtDescartes
The guy asked about 24 fret Gibson Les Pauls so I posted one. I wouldn't really think of a L6S as a Les Paul, a Les Paul DC I would however. You're right though, OP should get an ESP or an Epiphone.


Or a Moonstone or a Nik Huber or a Trussart or a Carvin CS or...

There are a LOT of 24-fret singlecuts out there, on the high end as well as on the low.
dspellman
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
100 IQ
#28
Quote by _tim*
But it's interesting, it seems that building only 22 frets guitars is kind of a tradition for Gibson. Even Explorers have only 22 frets, it's strange


They *have* done 24-fret guitars. The old (and new) M-III. The old (and new) L6S. The Buckethead guitar. Several models of SG. Several models of the DC. It's just that they haven't done a standard LP in 24.
tybacca60
Registered User
Join date: May 2012
90 IQ
#29
They make and ec-1000 with seymour duncan jb/jazz. Fits your bill quite nicely and can be had new for 769 and used around 500
Guitars:
Esp Ec-1000 VB with Emg 81/60
Esp ec-1000 Snow White with SD Jb/Jazz
Esp ltd f-50
Amp:
Randall rd-20h
Randall rd112-v30
Pedals:
Digitech rp-1000