samuelzz10
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2013
267 IQ
#1
I have several questions, and I didn't want to make 20 threads in one day so I'm hoping someone can help me out here.

My "band" is pretty nonexistent, me and the other members rarely get to meet up and the bass player and I meet up a lot but he has a problem: He barely ever writes material, and when he does it's basically all he wants to play an neglects everything else. Yes, this is the same bass player from the other thread. (Linky: here's the thread )

So, I was wondering what's a really easy place to get motivated musicians in a band? For starters, I can't put up flyers in my school because it's against the schools bullshit policy. Also, It's hard to even find musicians because all the obvious places (school band and orchestra) are filled with people who just play for extra curricular credit and don't care much for the metal. So where can I find people around my age for the band? (I just don't want a 40 something in the band, it would just be awkward.)

Also, how do you record material? I'm assuming you just plug guitars into a mixer, but I'm really oblivious as to how this works. I've written about 5 songs, and I've learned another 3 or so and I'm ready to start working on a demo. And, I don't want to buy any software like amplitude because I think digital effects in general are stupid because I would rather use my IRL pedals that I can use live. I'm looking at a PV6, to give you an idea of what interests me.

And finally, what is recommended for live shows? I know I'm not quite ready to play live as I don't have a drummer, but as far as onstage moves go, is doing stuff like copying another artist's moves (David Lee Roth's jump, or the powerslide) seen as generally ostentatious, stealing or stupid?


Thanks for any answers!
Last edited by samuelzz10 at Dec 5, 2013,
ironmanben
Registered User
Join date: May 2009
2,514 IQ
#2
If you meet up with the bass player a lot, maybe you should try to work out the songwriting issues. If he hasn't written guitar parts, for example, collaborate, write some riffs that go over his parts. Try to compromise. Play your ideas together once you work them out, even if they're not fully developed, so you and your bass player can get an idea of what sounds good.

Flyers are a great idea - try to find some local places where people your age hang out, coffee shops, pizza places, etc, and put some up. It might work to say how old you are in flyers. People answering the flyers are more likely to be into it if they're in your age range. As far as school goes, if you do find out somebody plays an instrument, don't hesitate go up and talk to them. Finding the right people is an exercise in patience.

As far as recording goes, guitars aren't usually recorded direct into a mixer - you usually want to mic the amp (which would allow you to use your pedals). I'm not so experienced with it, as I don't have my own recording equipment - I'm sure there are several other sources on the internet that can tell you what you can do. But I'd say solidify the band and make sure your songs are solid before you worry about recording.

Live shows depend on the venue, how much space you have onstage can restrict your movement. If you have a gig, try whatever you want onstage. But take a video so you can look back, see what looks silly, and see what works.
axemanchris
Awwww.... NOW what?!
Join date: Aug 2006
2,471 IQ
#3
Quote by samuelzz10

So, I was wondering what's a really easy place to get motivated musicians in a band? ...against the schools bullshit policy. ...


Music stores. Internet (Craigslist, etc.) Also word-of-mouth as you get to know and network with other musicians.

Your school has a bullshit policy? That's awesome. haha.

Quote by samuelzz10

Also, how do you record material?... I think digital effects in general are stupid because I would rather use my IRL pedals that I can use live.


It really depends on what you want out of a recording. If you want something release quality that you can sell at shows and get played on the radio, the short answer is, "you get someone else to do it." Otherwise, be prepared to invest a number of years learning how to do it, and a fair chunk of money investing in your new "instruments." Think of it this way.... How do you get piano tracks on your album when you don't have a piano player? The DIY person says, "I'll learn to do that myself." Great. Spend a couple of grand on a piano, start up with some lessons.... in a few years and a fair financial investment, you will have piano on your album. Otherwise, you stump up and pay someone.

If it is just a demo to play for your friends, go for it. DIY. Borrow some mics, get a copy of Reaper for $60, spend a couple hundred on an interface and you're off to the races. For guitars, yes, miking them up and sending the mic to a recorder is the best bet, usually. That said, there are some decent amp sims out there. I like HeadCase from Acme Bar Gig.

As far as effects go, the ones you use live are great for live, but to be totally honest, the digital effects that are out there, even as plugins, are usually better. You'd record your guitar with the basic sound you're looking for (the amp sound), and then add your chorus, delay, etc. later. This prevents you from finding yourself in the situation of, "Gee, that delay sounded really awesome when I was playing it, but it needs to be dialed back in the mix, and now I'm stuck with it."


Quote by samuelzz10

And finally, what is recommended for live shows? I know I'm not quite ready to play live as I don't have a drummer, but as far as onstage moves go, is doing stuff like copying another artist's moves (David Lee Roth's jump, or the powerslide) seen as generally ostentatious, stealing or stupid?


Thanks for any answers!


That's going to depend on your audience. A lot of people would call that silly, but hey... you might be surprised how it goes over if you try it. Feel the crowd. A lot of times, you can tell what they'll accept and what they won't.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Dec 5, 2013,
Danjo's Guitar
UG's Math/Physics Major
Join date: Jun 2007
995 IQ
#4
Quote by samuelzz10
And finally, what is recommended for live shows? I know I'm not quite ready to play live as I don't have a drummer, but as far as onstage moves go, is doing stuff like copying another artist's moves (David Lee Roth's jump, or the powerslide) seen as generally ostentatious, stealing or stupid?


Please god don't do it because you want to copy someone. Or because you think it will look cool. Do it because you feel it. If you feel like jumping, jump. If you have balls and feel like doing a powerslide, do it (be careful though). But don't be stupid or cheesy about it.
samuelzz10
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2013
267 IQ
#5
Thanks for all the advise! This really helps.
Quote by Danjo's Guitar
Please god don't do it because you want to copy someone. Or because you think it will look cool. Do it because you feel it. If you feel like jumping, jump. If you have balls and feel like doing a powerslide, do it (be careful though). But don't be stupid or cheesy about it.

I don't want to "copy" people, well, I do, but because I'm covering them. But yeah, I just want to play good live shows like Van Halen, Queen and KISS.
AlanHB
Godin's Resident Groupie
Join date: Aug 2008
1,703 IQ
#6
I see no issues with copying their moves. They have awesome moves.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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MaggaraMarine
Slapping the bass.
Join date: Oct 2009
3,411 IQ
#7
About the recording thing. If you want to just record some demos, I think digital modeling is the easiest way to do it. Your demos don't need to be professional studio quality. They are just demos. I usually record my ideas so that other guys in my band know what I'm after. I can get decent quality with my RP355 multi FX.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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koslack
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2008
624 IQ
#8
Do not focus on copying these moves right now. Focus on getting the material as tight as possible. EVH didn't start jumping all over the stage, and then mastered the guitar. He got insanely good, to the point where he was still able to play while jumping all over the stage. Asking whether you should copy guys like David Lee Roth when you're still getting the fundamentals of playing as part of a group down is like asking whether you should buy a Ferrari when you're a toddler learning to walk.

As for the demo, knowing how to record properly is a skill onto itself. Even just something as basic as microphone placement can take years to truly master. As Chris said, if you want something good, get somebody who knows what they're doing. Of course, that can be expensive. When it comes to recording, the rule of two out of three is very true: fast, cheap and good - you can have two out of the three.
If you just want something basic, you can do it yourself. You just need some mics, an interface, a mixer (depending on how many mics you have and the inputs on your interface) and a program like Garageband or Audacity. That being said, a program like Amplitube can be pretty great, since getting a good guitar sound when you're just starting out can be extremely difficult. I use it for my home recordings, and love it for its versatility and ease of use. A drum machine or MIDI drums would also be useful, since getting a good drum sound on tape can be EXTREMELY difficult, even if you do know what you're doing.