#1
I've been playing the acoustic guitar for a few months, and now I'm switching to electric + USB recording interface so that I can plug in my headphones and practice during quiet hours. Problem is, it sounds kinda...bad. Like, too much bass, crackling...I dunno if its a settings problem, or a headphones problem. All I've got at current time is the headphones and my crappy laptop speakers, so I can't tell. So, I've posted a short recording to soundcloud, and I'd appreciate if you guys'd tell me how it sounds through your speakers. Thanks!

Link: https://soundcloud.com/user715740553/greensleeves-guitar

My equipment:
Squier Affinity Guitar
Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 Recording Interface
GarageBand 10.0.1
"Brit and Clean" Amp Effect, default settings
Last edited by GeetarGal at Jan 6, 2014,
#2
Sounds alright to me. What headphones do you have?
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#3
A bit distorted, and a bit lacking bass if ya ask me.
Not that bad as you made it seem though.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#4
Thanks for the responses. I'm using V Moda Crossfade LP headphones that I got on sale a reeally long time ago. When I listen to the playback, the bass is almost entirely overpowering, and I have to really listen to hear the chords. If it sounds okay to you guys...I guess this means I should probably get new headphones.

Any recommendations?
#6
I'd prefer to spend less than $100, but I can go up to $150 if there's a noticeably better pair in that range.
#7
I'm a touch disappointed that no one responded, but I guess I'm not much surprised. Guitar Center is running a sale on AKG K44 Headphones, so I guess I'll try them.

Cheers!
#8
Sony MDR-7510 or Audio Technica ATH-M50
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#9
Quote by Spambot_2
Sony MDR-7510 or Audio Technica ATH-M50


Thanks for the recommendations. The Audio Technicas in particular have very good reviews online, and while they're a bit pricier, I think they'll be worth it in the long run.
#11
A couple days late here, but I love these headphones

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13845_3-57394096-58/get-an-altec-lansing-muzx-stereo-headset-for-$12.99/

I'm on my second set of them and would still be on my first if I didn't accidentally drop a cinder block on them (long story). Great sound, noise cancelling if you want that, they stand up to most abuse (except heavy objects), and I have never had a better pair of headphones, and I have gone through A LOT of headphones.
Equipment and Stuff: ESP LTD Ec-1000, LTD Mh-400, Schecter Omen Extreme 7, Cordoba Iberia C5-CE, Blue Bluebird Mic, Casio Lk-300 keyboard, Behringer X1622USB, Mbox 3rd gen, Guitar Pro 6, Pro Tools 11
#13
You need to look closer at the frequency range in the head phone.
Even a $3 ear bud would work if you purchase the proper frequency range.

It donsnt matter what brand you buy or how much money to spend.
It's what you're buying.

That's why when you mix your final mix. You have to becareful.
You wanna leave all in nutrual as much as posible.
Not unless you're just going to mix it for yourself.
To you it might sound ok...but to other people there's too much treble.

Not everyone are going to have the same head phone, speakers or EQ setting.
Most poeple are going leave their music play back on pop music or rock.
What you need to do it test your music on a crappy headphone or earbud.
If it sounds good on that...you'll sound OK on other settings.
What you do think other people are going to listen to your music on?
Go out and get specail earphones just to listen to your music?
Alter thier sound settings?
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 13, 2014,
#14
The thing to remember is that most consumer headphones especially some "DJ" endorsed headphones are designed to pump up certain frequencies especially the bass. If you are hearing too much bass it is probably because the headphones are designed that way. I have a set of fairly exspensive Bose headphones and they have way too much bass and you can't rely on the sound. Things sound awesome on the Bose headphones but you can't really get an accurate idea of what the real recording sounds like when you use them. It's the same with speakers. Home stereo or computer monitor speakers are specifically designed to pump up certain frequencies. That's why people who try to mix recordings on home stereo speakers (no matter how exspensive they were) are generally disappointed when they hear their recordings on other systems. That's why studio monitors are designed to be "flat" with no boost on any frequency. I spent years mixing my recordings on a really nice set of Ohm stereo speakers. My mixes sounded great at home but sounded like crap on anyone elses system. Once I got a regular pair of good flat studio monitors my mixes were improved tremendously. Same goes for headphones. Cost is not the problem. Some of the best headphones I have heard go for less than $50.00. My $200.00 Bose headphones just hang on the wall in my home studio. I know, it's frustrating.