#1
Hello I am a moderate guitar begginer and I have been playing for 2 months and I consider myself to be pretty well developed for withing those months. I am a pretty quick learner when it comes to music. My question is what scale are the main scales I should learn, I know there are a bunch i mean a bunch of scales, and I dont know where to dip my hands into the bunch. I want to start learning to play alittle bit of lead guitar and what are some of the more significant scales to learn. So far I have only been working on these. http://www.justinguitar.com/en/SC-001-TheMajorScale.php .

Thanks a bunch and I love this community and keep it up.
By the way please add me as a friend since I joined only 2 days ago.
#2
go for pentatonic cos it's pretty simple to learn all the shapes in it...... that way u can move up an down the fret board an ppl who have no musical knowledge will think ur the king

also........... e minor cos it is so damn metal!!!!!!!
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#3
Thanks so the what is the penatonic like is it just a major scale just broken up. And what are the most common Rock/Classic Rock and Blue Scales!!! Thanks For your input
#5
I recently watched some of the Speed Kills DVD with Michael Angelo Batio and he played some pretty cool stuff using this scale:

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?qqq=12&scch=D&scchnam=Major&get2=Get

I certainly don't have his speed but I can play some of it slowly and I think it sounds pretty cool. Shows you what you can do with a scale to make it not sound like a scale.

Regards,
Don
#6
musicians institute guitar fretboard work book and the guitar grimore book of scales and modes. ive learned the major scale in all keys and am working on the minor and pentatonic in all keys at the moment. wanted to learn it and these have got to be the best books for a full understanding of theory on scales and modes. And i think you should start with the major scale, if you know that its a ton easier learning any other scale i think.
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#7
hi,the major scale and the two minor scales is what you want to learn,then the pentatonic ,after you got those basics down then you can go after all types,myxolodians,lydians etc,etc(don't think i spelled myxolodian right,but it's not a spelling contest)
#8
Sorry bro, but after two months you are not a "moderate beginner". Youre a stone cold BEGINNER. Expect to be that why for awhile. In fact, your thread is proof of that.

Nothing wrong with that though. Everyone is a beginner at everything at one time or another.
#9
You have to start with the major scale when learning theory as everything else leads back to it.

However, you should probably hold off a little while with you being so new. You can't play lead unless you're a competent rhythm player, a big part of soloing is understanding which notes work over the underlying chords so you need to be pretty good with chords.

Learn loads more songs from all genres but hold off on learning to play the solos, instead learn them by ear. Learn to recognise and hum along to them...if you have the sound of a solo memorised you'll find it much, much easier to learn to play it. Also, the easier it is to memorise the sound the easier it's likely to be to play.
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#10
Quote by Axe Murderer
Sorry bro, but after two months you are not a "moderate beginner". Youre a stone cold BEGINNER. Expect to be that why for awhile. In fact, your thread is proof of that.

Nothing wrong with that though. Everyone is a beginner at everything at one time or another.


I know I was just replying that I am a pretty quick learner and I can play as of right no 13 songs mostly classic rock and punk. But I heard learning scales is very important and I wanted to know which ones I should start out with.
#11
Oh great, not another one of these

"look guys!!11!1!1! ZOMG i only been play for xxx months and i already kno xxx songs and can shred like petrucci!11!!1!1! i am bestest!1!!~~!!!!"

threads.
#12
He's actually asking for help, hence the title. The threads you are referring to are "How am I doing?" Threads which is basically full of BS.
#13
Quote by JRoyall
I know I was just replying that I am a pretty quick learner and I can play as of right no 13 songs mostly classic rock and punk. But I heard learning scales is very important and I wanted to know which ones I should start out with.


Scales are very important in the greater scheme of things, it's just that there's still a fair bit of stuff to concentrate on that's going to be of more use to you right now.
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#14
I consider people "moderate beginners" if they've played for a year, not two months. The thing about new guitar players, the ones who have played for <6 months, don't realize how badly they suck.

Pentatonic is a good place to start. Scales are the 2nd most important thing to becoming a good guitar player. Music theory is 1st. Scales help tell people what to play, theory help tell people how to comprehend what they play, the proper way (proper may sound strict, but improper playing is just s**t).
#15


scales ARE music theory
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#16
God some of you guys are reall ass holes and pick a post to pieces and critique every frickin word. I dont give a ****e what you thinka begginer is or moderate begginer all I am asking for what scales to start off with in my journey of learning guitar. From what I have hear the penatonic scales are the easiest to learn, and to incorrporate into your music and soloing. Am I right or wrong?


Quote by SnoDog
Oh great, not another one of these

"look guys!!11!1!1! ZOMG i only been play for xxx months and i already kno xxx songs and can shred like petrucci!11!!1!1! i am bestest!1!!~~!!!!"

threads.
#17
I am a beginner as well and my teacher had me learn all the blues scales. I found it easy to focus on one key. I started on E and learned to play E blues and E pentatonic all up the neck. Then when you get those finger patterns down, you pretty much just have to know where the root note from each scale is and play start from there with the same fingering pattern (for the most part). I found that to be a nice way to get started. Also, you will find some scales fit your style better than others so it will allow you to do some improvising on those scales/keys to practice some lead rifs.
~Nick
#18
Quote by JRoyall
God some of you guys are reall ass holes and pick a post to pieces and critique every frickin word. I dont give a ****e what you thinka begginer is or moderate begginer all I am asking for what scales to start off with in my journey of learning guitar. From what I have hear the penatonic scales are the easiest to learn, and to incorrporate into your music and soloing. Am I right or wrong?

I already told you.

The major scale.
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#19
thank you for your input I think I'm going to learn the major then minor and then penatonic. One question when practicing should I practce wirt a metronome and star out slow do it untill I perfect it then bump up the speed?
#20
Quote by steven seagull


scales ARE music theory

No ****. Any part of music, such as chords and scales, are a part of music theory. Anybody can learn scales but still be oblivious to all of music theory. Try being less of a smartass.
#21
Quote by metalimaster
go for pentatonic cos it's pretty simple to learn all the shapes in it...... that way u can move up an down the fret board an ppl who have no musical knowledge will think ur the king

also........... e minor cos it is so damn metal!!!!!!!


Wrong, wrong, wrong. Entirely wrong.

TS, do NOT restrict yourself to shapes and boxes. Scales are not shapes, they are collections of notes. First, as steven seagull suggested, learn the major scale; all scales, including the pentatonic scale, will relate back to it. Make sure you understand the scale, know its construction and intervals inside out. Then learn the formula for the pentatonic scale, and learn to apply it all over the fretboard. You can learn boxes as a quick positioning reference, but think of playing in terms of notes and not box shapes.

Also, make sure you have a very solid understanding of chords before moving to lead work.
#22
Quote by soadrocker856
No ****. Any part of music, such as chords and scales, are a part of music theory. Anybody can learn scales but still be oblivious to all of music theory. Try being less of a smartass.

no you can't.

You can learn scale patterns without theory, not scales. And therein lies the problem - people thing that by blindly following a tab of a single position scale position that they've "learned a scale", and they haven't. There's a lot of ignorance and misinformation in this forum with regards to theory and you're just adding to it...granted it's a small detail but it's an important one. Learning a box shape with no understanding of the notes or intervals teaches you next to nothing...somebody could teach me to read Japanese poetry purely phoenetically but that doesn't mean I can speak Japanese.

Try being less ignorant.

Quote by JRoyall
thank you for your input I think I'm going to learn the major then minor and then penatonic. One question when practicing should I practce wirt a metronome and star out slow do it untill I perfect it then bump up the speed?

Don't go down that road! Scales AREN'T about speed, they're about music - scales allow us to hear how certain notes sound together and give us a musical framework to work around. I personally see little point in rigidly practicing scale patterns, all it does is teach you to run up and down scale patterns and that makes for incredibly boring playing. Obviously you can use scale patterns as picking exercises or warmups, just bear in mind that it won't necessarily help your overall playing ability much. The best way to use scales when practicing is to practice licks and runs that you can actually use in your playing, for example sliding runs that travel along the fretboard.

The first thing to do when learning a scale is to learn how it sounds, play it on the guitar one interval at a time and really study them, listen to the way the two notes interact and listen for the same sound in music. The better you internalise a scale, let's say knowing it well enough to be able to hum it, the better you'll be able to use it.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Mar 24, 2008,
#23
well if you already know the major/minor scales then you will know the pentatonic because the pentatonic is a 5 note version of the major/minor scale. all you have to learn is witch notes to take out

so if you want to play in pentatonic just play a major/minor and leave out the notes.
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#25
Mk thank you for all of your input.
I know you know that I know you know who I am
#26
Hahah. Crazy thread. Just shows how much stuff there is to learn, and even how many more ways there is to learn it.

I bought a metronome, but dont use it right now. I have no need to keep time or anything, so why bother? Im not in a band or anything. Right now, I just want to learn how to play by, feel, if you will. I practice scales, but sometimes it slow. Sometimes its fast. Sometimes its choppy. Sometimes I skip notes. Im getting to the point where I can just play around with it. Way more fun than running up and down a scale for 15 minutes.

For me, I want to develop an 'ear' for what to play. That doesnt mean I dont want theory; on the contrary, I want that more. But I want to be able to play what I want, when I want without being a robot, and understand WHY Im playing it.

I dont even really mess with song tabs at the moment...
#27
depends what type of music you want to play - if you like playing the blues - learn the pentatonic scale 1st - i find it also the easiest
#28
Quote by Greg71
depends what type of music you want to play - if you like playing the blues - learn the pentatonic scale 1st - i find it also the easiest

Please don't bump very old threads for no reason.
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#29
99.999999999999 percent of western music is built around the major scale and its variations.Its the mother earth of them all so to speak.Steven Seagulls advice was the best here.Take the major scale and learn it like the back of you hand, not only patterns but its intervals,its sound, learn the circle of fifths,harmonize it etc etc etc.

Do that and you ll find out that you ll need to just move a few things around to create all the other scales you are interested in.That way ll learn everything from the ground up including theory and not bits and pieces from everywhere trying to string them together later.Dont be another one who molests 2.5 patterns of the minor pentatonic for about 10 minutes and thats it.Be serious and learn everything from the beginning..so...major scale mate,no way around it .
#30
Major scales - all 12, up and down the whole neck. Start on the lowest note in the scale that's on your instrument, and go up to the highest. That means you're learning a set of notes, not just a pattern, and that gives you a lot more flexibility when you play.

It can be really helpful to write out the scales before you play them. Look up the basic Major Scale pattern and, starting with C, work out all the intervals. It's like basic arithmetic. DO NOT just look up the scales! Figure them out based on the pattern. It shouldn't take very long, and it'll really get them in your memory.