whywefight
~I'm not fuckin around~
Join date: Dec 2010
110 IQ
#1
Does any one have any tips on how to get nice sounding vibrato on the high e string?

I've developed a decent vibrato on the other five strings, but every time I've tried vibrato on the top string I kind of either slip off the fret or it just doesn't sound good. I have to either put barely any vibrato in it or I just kind of half ass it with a tremolo (which works sporadicly).

But heres the thing: high notes without vibrato sound rather boring. For example, in the solo for Hey You (easiest solo in the world), I always am totally depressed by how much Gilmour's vibrato destroys mine at the very end of the solo.

TLDR: Read the first sentence.
Geldin
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2008
150 IQ
#2
I can never get vertical, or rock-style, vibrato to work on the high e string. I personally like horizontal, or classical, style vibrato. For higher notes, I tend to prefer a shorter, faster vibrato anyhow, though I can get a good quarter step or more in either direction that way.

David Gilmour's vibrato is otherworldly, so don't feel bad if you can't reach his degree of control. It's like moping that you can only play 15 notes per second when Michael Angelo Batio can hit 25. If you can get even remotely close, you're not doing half bad.
whywefight
~I'm not fuckin around~
Join date: Dec 2010
110 IQ
#3
Quote by Geldin
I can never get vertical, or rock-style, vibrato to work on the high e string. I personally like horizontal, or classical, style vibrato. For higher notes, I tend to prefer a shorter, faster vibrato anyhow, though I can get a good quarter step or more in either direction that way.

David Gilmour's vibrato is otherworldly, so don't feel bad if you can't reach his degree of control. It's like moping that you can only play 15 notes per second when Michael Angelo Batio can hit 25. If you can get even remotely close, you're not doing half bad.


Thanks, very interesting. I'll have to look into horizontal vibrato.
Viban
UG's resident bum
Join date: Nov 2011
150 IQ
#4
I can do a really tight/fast vibrato if I pull down, sounds decent though. It's alot easier to go up though. Sometimes I'll just use classical vibrato too, its alot easier.
Quote by R45VT
Bastards.
Last edited by Viban at Oct 4, 2012,
hammettrocks
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2004
10 IQ
#5
Side to side vibrato for the e and b strings. I save the slightly more aggressive sounding verticle vibrato for the thicker strings. I use my whammy bar a lot as well.
by the time you read this you will be wasting your time because it doesnt say anything
Facecut
Vorsitzender
Join date: May 2007
288 IQ
#6
Vertical Vibrato all the way, the horizontal vibrato an electric just disappears, but you do know that you have to bend upwards on the b and e string which makes it more difficult? It can be hard with your index because it sits too near to your center of rotation, its knuckle. You can try to move the whole hand down a bit so your index is stretched and you have an effective arm of e lever.
mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
Join date: Feb 2008
60 IQ
#7
Quote by whywefight
Does any one have any tips on how to get nice sounding vibrato on the high e string?

I've developed a decent vibrato on the other five strings, but every time I've tried vibrato on the top string I kind of either slip off the fret or it just doesn't sound good. I have to either put barely any vibrato in it or I just kind of half ass it with a tremolo (which works sporadicly).

But heres the thing: high notes without vibrato sound rather boring. For example, in the solo for Hey You (easiest solo in the world), I always am totally depressed by how much Gilmour's vibrato destroys mine at the very end of the solo.

TLDR: Read the first sentence.

When you do vibrato on other strings, it's default to pull the string down and let it come back to it's original position.

So for the top e string, just bend the string up instead and release. common sense, really. Of course it's gonna come off the neck, there's no bloody room!

Unless you're intending to do something like at 1:16

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdrweUGfuP0

Anyway, it's just a series of mini bends.

Make sure the movement comes from the wrist.

You can also try Steve Vai's circular vibrato style.
Last edited by mdc at Oct 4, 2012,
Freepower
v It's Back! :D
Join date: Feb 2004
479 IQ
#8
An easy solution is to bend up to your target tone and then do the vibrato. A lot of Dave Gilmours vibrato sound is due to the fact he's got great control on bent notes, not just fretted ones. Bend and vibrato will always sound more in tune than straight rock vibrato, as you can go above and below the note instead of just above it.
whywefight
~I'm not fuckin around~
Join date: Dec 2010
110 IQ
#9
Quote by mdc
When you do vibrato on other strings, it's default to pull the string down and let it come back to it's original position.

So for the top e string, just bend the string up instead and release. common sense, really. Of course it's gonna come off the neck, there's no bloody room!


Yeah thats just kind of one of those things I never really tried to fix in my playing and I'm just now noticing sounds rough. I'll definitely try out all the different techniques mentioned.