imaginedbufalo
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2010
40 IQ
#1
Hello, I have a Martin ooox1ae and like it but want a nice bright guitar. I play mostly fingerstyle stuff like sungha jung and i like the drifting style such as andy mckee and ocean by john butler. I am willing to spent around $800usd. Would you reccommend any brands or specific guitar?

Thanks, Jimmy
patticake
Acoustic Goddess
Join date: Jun 2009
200 IQ
#2
bright? taylor. you don't mention a guitar size, but their GA sized guitars from the 100 series or 200 series might be just the ticket.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
30 IQ
#5
Quote by WaltTheWerewolf
Simon & Patrick(godin same as seagull) are pretty much some bright decent sounding guitars. I have their 12 string and that sucker is bright!
That is a completely irrelevant correlation. All 12 strings are bright, period. It's because they have 6 extra strings, 4 of them tuned an octave higher than the primes. My guitar teacher, who owned one and knew a bunch, said they sounded a fifth higher than a standard 6 string. I expect that one 12 could be "edgier" in the high end than another. They're all bright, some may be brighter.

In fact, I've been wondering if the Seagull 12 string would be a little less shrill than most, since it has a cedar top.

I actually like stringing my twelves with Uncoated phosphor bronze strings. 1: so they're mellower from the start than brass (80/20) and 2: so they go dead pretty quick.

Then, I plug them in, EQ the bass up, the mids down a bit, and the treble down even more.

As Patti pointed out, Taylor has a reputation for bright. I can't speak to Simon & Patrick or Seagull, as to tonal philosophy in general. But their big seller, The Seagull "Original S-6", has more notoriety for being mellow rather than being strident.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 11, 2012,
WaltTheWerewolf
Caffeinated
Join date: Sep 2008
70 IQ
#6
Quote by Captaincranky
That is a completely irrelevant correlation. All 12 strings are bright, period. It's because they have 6 extra strings, 4 of them tuned an octave higher than the primes. My guitar teacher, who owned one and knew a bunch, said they sounded a fifth higher than a standard 6 string. I expect than one 12 could be "edgier" in the high end than another. They're all bright, some may be brighter.

In fact, I've been wondering if the Seagull 12 string would be a little less shrill than most, since it has a cedar top.

I actually like stringing my twelves with Uncoated phosphor bronze strings. 1: so they're mellower from the start than brass (80/20) and 2: so they go dead pretty quick.

Then, I plug them in, EQ the bass up, the mids down a bit, and the treble down even more.

As Patti pointed out, Taylor has a reputation for bright. I can't speak to Simon & Patrick or Seagull, as to tonal philosophy in general. But their big seller, The Seagull "Original S-6", has more notoriety for being mellow rather than being strident.


what i ment was compared to other 12 strings i've owned and played, the Simon & Patrick is bright as hell...yes they are all bright, but although it sounds good i've experienced some with a little more bottom end which mine severely lacks lol. I have played many Simon & Patrick 6 strings and they too have a bright tone...of course i dont mean that in a bad way.

none of this post was an attack by the way...i should have explained myself more lol.

how about the concert styled bodies would those be considered brighter but some more mids? if he goes for any Dreadnought its gonna have some boxiness to it.
Last edited by WaltTheWerewolf at Oct 11, 2012,
Prescott_Player
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2012
10 IQ
#7
Brightness is more a function of the woods used, and the strings and the pick you use. I could write you a book about that, but let's just start by saying that you probably want a mahogany body and a solid Sitka spruce top. You can always replace the strings and pick later, very inexpensively.
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
30 IQ
#8
Quote by WaltTheWerewolf
what i ment was compared to other 12 strings i've owned and played, the Simon & Patrick is bright as hell...yes they are all bright, but although it sounds good i've experienced some with a little more bottom end which mine severely lacks lol.
Well, better not much bass, than too much loose bass, I suppose. Like I said, PB strings, plug in, EQ, which cures a multitude of sins. I find that because of the high string tension, compression artifacts set in quite quickly with a 12 string. You can simply beat on a six string harder. So. better dynamic range with a six. Twelves work very nicely for many things, but they lack the ability to "punctuate", like a six. They just load up when you strum them hard.

Quote by WaltTheWerewolf
I just I have played many Simon & Patrick 6 strings and they too have a bright tone...of course i dont mean that in a bad way.
Then you making those types of comparisons would be more helpful. "A Simon & Patrick, Blue Goose" is way brighter than some Martins I've played". More like that..

Like I said, is a Seagull 12 string with a cedar top, mellower than many other 12 strings with spruce top? (Apples to apples).

But 12 strings to 6 string, not the best data base.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 11, 2012,
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
30 IQ
#9
Quote by Prescott_Player
Brightness is more a function of the woods used, and the strings and the pick you use. I could write you a book about that, but let's just start by saying that you probably want a mahogany body and a solid Sitka spruce top. You can always replace the strings and pick later, very inexpensively.
Gosh Preston, "Sitka spruce top, mahogany B & S"! That describes about 80% of the acoustics out there. How do we thin out the herd, so to speak?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 11, 2012,
WaltTheWerewolf
Caffeinated
Join date: Sep 2008
70 IQ
#12
Quote by imaginedbufalo
I dont use a pick so that wont help ):


sorry bout that, saw John Butler in your post...ya know his CLAWS add some brightness too. I prefere to keep a little bit of nail to work with on the strings, get a very warm sound with the nails clipped.
patticake
Acoustic Goddess
Join date: Jun 2009
200 IQ
#14
i like the taylor 114 of the solid top taylors - pretty nice if you're looking for a bright guitar. for less money, the fender tim armstrong hellcat is a bright guitar with a solid top.

and don't overlook strings. different strings can make a huge difference.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!