#1
Hi all, I basically want to learn about a car engine works, mostly so I know what to look out for myself when purchasing a vehicle, but also so I have knowledge to maintain and modify an existing engine. I don't want to be ignorant but I have not had a wealth of existing knowledge when it comes to engines, yet I have always had a passion for cars and driving for as long as I remember.

So I am referring to:

*a petrol engine

*fuel injection as opposed to carburetor, although knowledge of both would be nice

etc.

Are there any websites or sources I can refer to to get started?
Last edited by HeadlessCross at Apr 7, 2013,
#2
the wheels on the bus go round and round
i don't know why i feel so dry
#3
There should be a carburetor installed in every car as a law (at least in the US). It takes the more toxic gasses that are expelled from the engine and converts them into (slightly) less toxic gasses

EDIT: I was thinking Catalytic Converter, I was super tired last night
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Last edited by Enigmatic564 at Apr 7, 2013,
#4
I'll offer a tip that sounds wrong, is right and probably not common knowledge. Your car battery requires water to be topped up every now and again. Think once a year or maybe more.
#5
Go on car forums mate, i've learnt shitloads from certain car forums. What cars are you planning to mod?
Sincerely,
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#6
Quote by Enigmatic564
There should be a carburetor installed in every car as a law (at least in the US). It takes the more toxic gasses that are expelled from the engine and converts them into (slightly) less toxic gasses

... That's not a carb.

That'a catalytic converter.

As far as carbs go, that's where air and fuel are mixed.
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Last edited by stratman_13 at Apr 7, 2013,
#7
Get a part time job at a mechanic's workshop, every car is different and the best way to learn is to actually pull bits out and put them (or their replacement) back, I've done it and it was kinda cool and I know a hell of a lot more about cars now.
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Last edited by strait jacket at Apr 7, 2013,
#10
I'll tell one peice of info that not a lot people know: when you step on the gas pedal, you're actually opening a valve to let the air, so to be more accurate it should be called an air pedal. And it depend on how much air goes in ( sensor readings) the fuel gets poured in. This ofcourse is the new engine models, where the older carburator using models used to directly pour fuel while steping on the gas pedal.
#11
Quote by HeadlessCross
Hi all, I basically want to learn about a car engine works, mostly so I know what to look out for myself when purchasing a vehicle, but also so I have knowledge to maintain and modify an existing engine. I don't want to be ignorant but I have not had a wealth of existing knowledge when it comes to engines, yet I have always had a passion for cars and driving for as long as I remember.

So I am referring to:

*a petrol engine

*fuel injection as opposed to carburetor, although knowledge of both would be nice

etc.

Are there any websites or sources I can refer to to get started?


I must say this is the LAST place I thought there would be a car related question.

Petrol, or gasoline, engines run off air, fuel and spark at the appropriate times. This is different than a diesel engine; they run off heat, air and fuel. The fuel ignites under compression from the piston.

Carbs are the old-school form for gettin gas to the engine. Basically a mechanical fuel pump will dump fuel into the carb and mix it with air. This mixture goes into the cylinder ignites. There are 3 primary forms of fuel injection: Throttle body, port and direct injection. These all use electric fuel pumps (Normally bolted onto the frame of the car or submerged in the gas tank). Throttle body fuel injection was the "transitional" injection system from carburetors to port and use the same principles as carburetors. Port Fuel injection is in most vehicles since the early 90s and has a injector for each cylinder. This inject a specific amount of fuel into each cylinder to achieve a 14.7:1 air/fuel ratio in most cases. Direct injection has been used in diesel for a long time and is now moving its way into the gasoline engines. This, like port, has an injector for every cylinder. But instead of the injector being outside of the valve(there are typically 2 or 4 per cyinder, 1 or 2 to let air/gas in and 1 or 2 to let the burnt fuel out), it is located directly inside the cylinder. This is a highly effective form of injection.

youtube . com /watch?v=aATDsYVVcRM

(This is a naration of the video naming the parts and components with in a simple engine.)

For a little more indepth, this video starts with the block of older style v8 engine, it then adds the crankshaft and the mains, and main bearings.
Then it adds the connecting rods to the crankshaft. and the pistons to the other end of the connection rod.
The shaft in the middle is called the camshaft and is connected to the crankshaft by a timing chain in this application (in other is will be connected via a belt). The camshaft is responsible for opening and close the valves at the right times.
The pushrods and afomented chain are added in the video.
Since this is an older engine, it has pushrods (shown touching the camshaft) to push the rocker arms the open the valves, whice are closed by a spring that is held in my means of a retainer.
The timing chain cover, oil pan and oil filter are now added.
The valves, valve springs and retains are now shown.
Now the rocker arms are added to the assembly.
Now the cylinder head, valve cover and intake manifold(allows air into the engine) are added.
The distributor(has a gear that connects to the camshaft. The inside rotates and creates spark for the spark plugs), fuel injectors(This is a port fuel injection system), fuel rail and fuel lines are now added.
The rest of the intake system is added.
The exhaust manifolds are also now added.
The harmonic balancer is now added.
The water pump is now added.
The water pump pully, crankshaft pully, alternator and the belt is added.

Now you have a nearly fully functioning v8 engine. All you needs is the rest of the drivetrain!!

I hope this helps you in your search for car knowledge.

Snow
#12
Quote by Rebel Scum
I'll offer a tip that sounds wrong, is right and probably not common knowledge. Your car battery requires water to be topped up every now and again. Think once a year or maybe more.


That is how batteries used to be. That isn't necessary and more. I'd say 90% of all modern batteries are non-serviceable. This means DO NOT ADD WATER!
#13
Haynes manuals probably exist for the car you're working on. That'll give you an idea of exactly how your vehicle works and how it is put together.

But really, cars are not difficult machines to understand how they work.
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#14
Just take a friend who knows bulk about cars, or befriend a younger mechanic to come car shopping.
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#16
Advanced Engine Technology - Heinz Heisler.

Great Source. Available online as a PDF if you look hard enough.
#18
Quote by Enigmatic564
There should be a carburetor installed in every car as a law (at least in the US). It takes the more toxic gasses that are expelled from the engine and converts them into (slightly) less toxic gasses


Quote by Rebel Scum
I'll offer a tip that sounds wrong, is right and probably not common knowledge. Your car battery requires water to be topped up every now and again. Think once a year or maybe more.


Well since the first two pieces of advice in this thread were completely wrong, I would definitely recommend going elsewhere for advice. Maybe an auto forum? I'll let you know if I find a decent website.

EDIT: Oh yeah, Youtube videos, as suggested above. There's enough of them out there to make a step-by-step manual to completely disassemble and replace everything under the hood.
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LET'S GO BUCKS
Last edited by AeroRocker at Apr 7, 2013,
#20
Let me summarize the combustion engine for you: suck, squeeze, bang, blow

I specialize in jet engines so unless you want too know about that...
Warning: The above post may contain lethal levels of radiation, sharp objects and sexiness.
Proceed with extreme caution!
#21
I thought this thread was going to be about the psychology of people who fix cars.

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