Page 1 of 3
#1
I am about to buy my first acoustic guitar. I did a little research and found out, that solid top guitars are the way to go, so I've been looking for those and I found two guitars, that have solid tops and are within my budget. These are:
Fender CD-140S
Yamaha FG 800M
These two are the only ones I found in my country (Slovakia) in my budget. (200 - 250$)
Do you guys have any experience with these guitars? Which one is better in your opinion?
As I looked through the specs I noticed four differences.
1. The Fender has 25.3 inch scale length, while the Yamaha has 25". Which one is better?
2. The Fender has Graph Tech® NuBone nut and saddle, while the Yamaha has Urea.
3. The Fender has Dual action truss rod, while the yamaha has single. (I don't really know the difference)
4. The Fender has Mahagony back and sides, while the Yamaha has Nato.
Based on these differences I'm leaning towards the Fender, but I wan't to ask for your opinion as well, because I wan't the best "buck for the money" as they say.
Thanks.
Last edited by tomi210210 at Feb 18, 2017,
#3
One scale length isn't "better" than another--a longer scale length means more tension on the strings, which has pluses and minuses. You're not likely to feel a big difference between 25 and 25.3 anyway. I have had better experiences with Yamaha acoustics than Fenders, but this particular Fender sounds like it might be made with better materials than this particular Yamaha. Are they in a store you can visit and try both out?
Death to Ovation haters!
Last edited by PatchworkMan at Feb 18, 2017,
#4
PatchworkMan

Yeah, I'm not sure how much those differences in material would matter though. My all-time favourite acoustic for fingerpicking, and I've had a few expensive ones, is all-laminate. A double-acting truss rod can fix a back-bow and reduce climatic variation in neck relief, but it can also be a liability, as the adjusting nut cannot be removed if , for example, the socket strips. Swings and roundabouts.

I agree that try it and see is by far the best option if feasible. You have to trust your ears.
#5
Of the two I would go with the Yamaha FG 800M. I know people who have Yahama for years and they have held up well.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#6
Quote by tomi210210

As I looked through the specs I noticed four differences.
1. The Fender has 25.3 inch scale length, while the Yamaha has 25". Which one is better?
In truth, both of those scales are slightly "short" of what has become the standard for big body acoustics, 25.5".

The whole idea is to produce more string tension, which then transfers more energy to the bridge and top, allowing more volume and projection from the guitar. OK, there is a downside, which is higher fretting pressure. It does make you work a bit harder, and depending on the length of your fingers, it can make some open position stretches more difficult, if not impossible. Consider holding an F chord at the 1st fret.Then open up, and try to put the 5th fret "A" note of the e-1 string on top of the chord. I find it much easier with a shorter scale, but as they say, "thems the breaks".

Many parlor size guitars as well as a few big body Gibsons carry a 24.75" scale, and there is quite a difference in playability between them, particularly down low on the neck. Beyond anything I might have to say, you might want to try a Les Paul versus a Stratocaster, which is the classic short scale to long scale comparison.

But for the sake of this discussion, if you're looking at either a dreadnought, "grand auditorium", (Taylor's "GA"), or a jumbo, it will more than likely have a 25.5" scale. I think Carvin uses a 25" scale for their semi acoustic guitars.
Quote by tomi210210
2. The Fender has Graph Tech® NuBone nut and saddle, while the Yamaha has Urea.
I believe "urea" is a chemical precursor to polyurethane, but you might want to check. Arguably Yamaha might be using "urea" to convey the nut material is a "natural substance". For my "taste", the term is too close to "piss" for comfort.. .
Quote by tomi210210
3. The Fender has Dual action truss rod, while the yamaha has single. (I don't really know the difference).
A dual action truss rod, pulls in both directions. In others words, (which may not help you as of yet), it applies stress to both put relief in, and take it out. With a single action truss rod, it will apply tension to straighten the neck, (which takes relief out), but the tension of the strings themselves, must apply the pressure to put relief in. As soon as you research the term "relief", as it attaches to the neck of a guitar, this will immediately become crystal clear.
Quote by tomi210210
4. The Fender has Mahagony back and sides, while the Yamaha has Nato.
Does it? "Nato" has morphed into being called, "African mahogany", partly due to physical similarity to tropical mahogany, and also because true tropical mahogany is getting very difficult, if nor damned near impossible to get. I dunno, maybe Fender still has a stash of it, maybe they don't. At any rate, both woods have a similar sound, which is further diluted by the fact both guitars have laminated back & sides. (Assuming both guitars had solid wood B & S, the difference might be more pronounced).
Quote by tomi210210
Based on these differences I'm leaning towards the Fender, but I wan't to ask for your opinion as well, because I wan't the best "buck for the money" as they say.
Thanks.
Well, don't we all.

Yamaha as a brand sells more entry level guitars than Fender without a doubt.I have a Fender "Sonoran", and based on its current minimum advertised price, I don't really consider it "the best bang for the buck" out there. But that's a kitsch piece with a maple Strat neck, and sort of has a "stupidity/novelty surcharge" attached.

Based on the feedback I've heard, the Yamaha is most likely the "better investment", but Fender's acoustics are coming along, and you kind of have to like the guitar you're buying. So, the Yamaha is most likely the sounder choice. (pun not intended).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 19, 2017,
#7
tomi210210

Of these two you have described, I would choose the Fender. That being said, you should buy the one that feels better to you and that is easier to fret and play. You will certainly want to upgrade later, probably more than once if you continue playing like I have for the past 47 years. I now have 6 guitars and play them all, different guitars for different styles of music and different songs and sounds.
#8
Thank you all for the replies. Yes, I can try these out, as a matter of fact, I just went and did today. Both of these guitars feel and sound very good to me, although I don't really have reference to compare them to. As I was in the store I discovered another solid top guitar, that fits my budget, it's the Ibanez AW70 Artwood. Do you guys think is it better than the other two?
Some of it's specs:
Solid Sitka Spruce top
Sapele back and sides
25.5" scale length
1.69" nut
Ibanez Ivorex II nut and saddle material.
#9
tomi210210

All are good starter guitars, but I would see if you can find a Jasmine, which is a very inexpensive Korean made CF Martin that plays extremely well....usually around $100 US dollars. Otherwise, I would choose the Fender.
#10
Quote by tomi210210
Thank you all for the replies. Yes, I can try these out, as a matter of fact, I just went and did today. Both of these guitars feel and sound very good to me, although I don't really have reference to compare them to. As I was in the store I discovered another solid top guitar, that fits my budget, it's the Ibanez AW70 Artwood. Do you guys think is it better than the other two?
Some of it's specs:
Solid Sitka Spruce top
Sapele back and sides
25.5" scale length
1.69" nut
Ibanez Ivorex II nut and saddle material.

If you can push your budget up to $329, You can grab you Epiphone Hummingbird which is also a steal right now.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#11
Any of these will be fine for you as a beginner. My first guitar was actually a kids toy that had plastic, not nylon, strings and was in between the size of a youth guitar and a ukulele. It cost all of $10 U.S. in 1969 and I played it every day until my folks bought me a $880 CF Martin D28 for my 15th birthday in 1977, which I still have a play almost every day. In 2003 I bought a $1400 Gibson ES137 Classic Tri-burst hollow body acoustic / electric, which I also still have and play. My uncle passed away in 2005 and left me a one of a kind 1960 Paul Brae hand made custom hard body electric, which I still have and play. In 2014 I bought a $4300 Taylor K26ce, which I still have and play. Last month, my father gave me his 1959 custom one of a kind Fiesta Red Fender Jazzmaster hard body electric, which is the guitar that first inspired me to learn to play 48 years ago. The point that I am making is buy what you can comfortably afford now, learn to play, and upgrade as your skill and wallet will allow.
#12
Tomi, Check out the AJ220s. It is running 229 on amazon right now without a case. It has a solid top.
Here is a video from Epiphone youtube page.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#13
Quote by Blackwaterson89
Tomi, Check out the AJ220s. It is running 229 on amazon right now without a case. It has a solid top.
I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but $229.00 is the MAP for that guitar. In other words, everybody has it for $229.00.

Now on the other hand, Musician's Friend is haveing their Presidents Day Sale, and you could buy the guitar for 15% off. You two can do the math. And that's with free UPS ground shipping included: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/epiphone-aj-220s-acoustic-guitar

It pays you to cal the toll free, and give the coupon code you see online, to the real live American person who will answer the phone! It's so much more civilized buying stuff that way.
#14
Quote by tjfrench
tomi210210

All are good starter guitars, but I would see if you can find a Jasmine, which is a very inexpensive Korean made CF Martin that plays extremely well....usually around $100 US dollars. Otherwise, I would choose the Fender.
Actually, I believe "Jasmine", is a Takamine budget line. I also think they all have laminated, which kind of handicaps them in relation to the other guitars being discussed.

Takamine’s US-American distributor is KMC Musicorp.

While known primarily for their acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars, Takamine produced a limited run of very high quality solid body electric guitars in the early 1980’s.[1] These are the GX100 (Gibson Explorer body style), GX200 (proprietary type body style similar to a Stratocaster, stop tailpiece bridge), GX200-T or TB, (same as GX200 only with a tremolo bridge) GZ300 (proprietary design) and GZ340 (proprietary design). The GX200 and GZ340 contain factory DiMarzio made pickups.[2]

The Takamine F-340 was the cause of a letter from Martin Guitars in the early 1980s because Takamine’s acoustic guitars including the logo design were supposedly nearly identical to Martin Models[citation needed]. According to Chris F. Martin IV, CEO of CF Martin and Company in a speech given to the Unofficial Martin Guitar Forum members on August 8, 2005, no lawsuit was ever actually filed, and Takamine did change the appearance of their guitars[citation needed].

Every year since 1987 Takamine presents a Limited Edition Guitar model, which gets produced in very limited quantities up to a few hundred guitars for the world wide distribution. These guitars always come with the latest pickup/preamplifier combination available and artful inlays, often with motifs focusing on nature or astronomical phenomena.[3]

Takamine also manufacture a lower cost range of guitars in Korea. They are marketed under the Jasmine brand name."
#15
Quote by Captaincranky
Actually, I believe "Jasmine", is a Takamine budget line. I also think they all have laminated, which kind of handicaps them in relation to the other guitars being discussed.

Jasmine is the budget line, but Takamine has one guitar that runs $199.It is the GD10. Sadly it is not a solid top. The Jasmine JD37 has a solid top.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
Last edited by Blackwaterson89 at Feb 19, 2017,
#16
Captaincranky,

I was trying not to get into the weeds. "Jasmine", which as you noted is a Korean Takamine, both of which are knock offs of a CF Martin. While I did not comment on solid wood vs laminate, the Fender CD-140S has laminate on the sides and back. However, the Yamaha FG 800, Ibanez AW70 Artwood, Epiphone Hummingbird and the Epiphone AJ 220S are solid wood guitars. I recommended the Jasmine because I bought one for my son's first guitar and they play extremely well in my opinion for the money compared to anything else in tomi210210's stated price range (200-250$).
#17
The Epiphones, both have laminate back and sides as well.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#18
tjfrench

Since "solid" isn't specified, I would assume that the FG800 is laminated b&s, the same with the Artwood. I didn't check the others. Not that it would bother me in the least, laminated has some stuctural advantages, and I trust my ears for tone. - As I've noted many times before, my all-time favourite guitar (and I've owned some fancy gear) for fingerpicking is all-laminate.
#19
Thanks Blackwaterson89, I stand corrected. Both Epiphones do use "Select Mahogany" (i.e. laminated mahogany) for the back and sides. The Jasmine guitars have a solid spruce top and sapele or Agathis (i.e. commercial grade mahogany) back and sides with a nato neck and rosewood fingerboard and bridge.
#20
Quote by tjfrench
Captaincranky,

I was trying not to get into the weeds. "Jasmine", which as you noted is a Korean Takamine, both of which are knock offs of a CF Martin.
Since we're dealing in metaphor now, if you don't want to "get into the weeds", so to speak.might I suggest you don't play in the garden. Most to nearly all of the information you've posted thus far has been wrong.

First off, virtually every square shoulder dreadnought could arbitrarily be called, "a C.F.Martin knockoff". Once upon a time, Japanese guitar manufactures did copy Martins to the smallest detail. These were to become known as, "law suit guitars", since that is what they precipitated here in the US. IIRC, Takamine was of the makers involved. Although as with anything else I put up on the spur of the moment, feel free to do your own research.

Here are some other fun facts. The Martin company at one time, did have an Asian subsidiary, "Sigma". The relationship has since dissolved, AFAIK..

Epiphone doesn't have a single all solid wood acoustic in their line, until you get to their "Masterbilt" series. They do, (at least did), have a guitar with a solid top and back, but still laminated sides, "The Inspired by 1964 Texan", (clunky name, right?) This has (had?) a solid spruce top and a solid mahogany back, but with laminated body sides Here's that: http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Acoustic-Electric/Inspired-by-1964-Texan.aspx
They've also released, (just found this out), what they're calling an "Elitist" series of all solid acoustics.

Normally, when any member recommends a specific guitar over and over, the habit becomes known as a "buyers affirmation shitpost", whether fairly or unfairly.

But here we have a situation where you're recommending a specific model because , "it plays good". Now, given that most big body Asian acoustics today, have settled into a 25.5" scale & 1 11/16" neck, and other than gross discrepancies in body size and or shape, they should all be made to play similarly "well".

String alloy composition and gauge, along with a proper setup, should allow very similar results with different brands of guitars. Keep in mind differences in string heights on the order of a few thousandths of an inch, can have dramatic effects on the way a guitar handles.Neck profile is a bit of a wild card as well, but my Ibanez AEL-10's neck has a very similar profile to my Epiphone EJ-200, and there's no problem or "shock to the senses", when moving from one to the other.

So, here's an excellent guide to the setup of acoustic guitars: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html And in keeping with with I just said, a $100.00 guitar can be made to play better than a $1000.00 which hasn't been setup correctly.

Quote by tjfrench
While I did not comment on solid wood vs laminate, the Fender CD-140S has laminate on the sides and back. However, the Yamaha FG 800, Ibanez AW70 Artwood, Epiphone Hummingbird and the Epiphone AJ 220S are solid wood guitars. I recommended the Jasmine because I bought one for my son's first guitar and they play extremely well in my opinion for the money compared to anything else in tomi210210's stated price range (200-250$).
Here's a link to Epiphone's current acoustic electric line: http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Acoustics/Acoustic-Electric.aspx

and another to there acoustic only line: http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Acoustics/Acoustic.aspx

And just for the heck of it their Masterbilt series: http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Acoustics/Masterbilt.aspx

Take a few moments to discover which is made of what.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 20, 2017,
#21
Captaincranky

You apparently missed the point of both this forum and this thread (sharing to help others). Go ahead and keep telling yourself and others how much you know and maybe you actually will someday.
#22
Quote by tjfrench
Captaincranky

You apparently missed the point of both this forum and this thread (sharing to help others). Go ahead and keep telling yourself and others how much you know and maybe you actually will someday.
I actually do share and try to help others. In fact, I've been trying to do that here for over 5 years. What I do, is try my best not to post a lot of misinformation.

Judging by your posting here, it seems you're laboring under the impression that trying to help, no matter how errant, ineffectual, or inaccurate it might be, counts as a win. Is it at this juncture, we differ.

So, I know what I know, I know what I don't know, and I always try to take the time to research the things I don't know. Point being, when you have an accurate point of reference you don't have to "convince yourself" of anything. (In your context of course, "convince" is a euphemism for "lying to oneself").
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 20, 2017,
#24
Quote by Captaincranky
I actually do share and try to help others. In fact, I've been trying to do that here for over 5 years. What I do, is try my best not to post a lot of misinformation.

Judging by your posting here, it seems you're laboring under the impression that trying to help, no matter how errant, ineffectual, or inaccurate it might be, counts as a win. Is it at this juncture, we differ.

So, I know what I know, I know what I don't know, and I always try to take the time to research the things I don't know. Point being, when you have an accurate point of reference you don't have to "convince yourself" of anything. (In your context of course, "convince" is a euphemism for "lying to oneself").
Quote by Tony Done
tjfrench

Sharing inaccurate information, eg solid b&s, isn't at all helpful though, and just contributes to the great cloud of truth-by-hearsay already choking the internet.

Quote by tjfrench
Thanks Blackwaterson89, I stand corrected. Both Epiphones do use "Select Mahogany" (i.e. laminated mahogany) for the back and sides. The Jasmine guitars have a solid spruce top and sapele or Agathis (i.e. commercial grade mahogany) back and sides with a nato neck and rosewood fingerboard and bridge.

More like you are missing the point. Capt, Dread, and Tony know their shit. If I needed to ask question I can call my grandfather, but if I didn't have him I would go to these three guys. You are openly giving misinformation. None of those guitars are all solid wood. They have solid tops and the rest is laminated. You are going be paying 1000 plus for most solid wood guitar unless you make it yourself.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#26
Fender is cranky loud, I have a epi Hummingbird pro, silky smooth fret board, great action , and perfect for "cowboy" chords and rhythm. About $350, that and a metronome (Korg has the best}. However, if you are just starting out get a used guitar at the pawn shop or from a buddy and see if you pick that thing up for a week straight before you plop down anything more than $99. I got an old $99 Maestro by Gibson that I first bought and now I use it for slide (high action was like a crucifixion cross on my fingers but I paid my dues and now I know some of the difference in quality) so even if you do move on, dont forget about your old clunker, she may come back in your dating pool.
#27
the fender isn't any louder than any similar guitar i've played.

i have been a big fan of yamaha solid tops, but honestly the fender 140 is a decent guitar. if you have no preference, i'd go for the yamaha. i take it you don't have seagull guitars there?

i'd listen to the Captain - he's spent his time learning and sharing a lot of acoustic guitar knowledge, and it's always a plus to know more about what you want to play/buy.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#28
tomi210210 I recommend an electric guitar only diet. If you absolutely must have an acoustic than a hallow-body is as close to an acoustic guitar anyone should get.
1984 Yamaha SG1000X
2006 Epiphone Sheraton II
2006 Epiphone Les Paul Black Beauty 3
2011 Gretsch G5120 Electromatic Hollowbody
#29
Try each and see which you prefer. Personally, though, as a starter guitar, I'd go with the Yamaha.
#31
Partially, I'm just being silly. But I do find acoustic guitars to be more brutal on my finger tips than most electrics. And this is kind of a Jeff Beck reference as well because he has been quoted saying he only plays electrics. Although I am not a Jeff Beck fan, anyone who is into guitars will run in to his name sooner or later. Talented man of coarse, just not my choice of music.

As far as buying a new guitar, I highly recommend going to a music store where the guitars you are considering are available for you to test them out and put in some time playing each one to assess which feels best or is more to your liking.
1984 Yamaha SG1000X
2006 Epiphone Sheraton II
2006 Epiphone Les Paul Black Beauty 3
2011 Gretsch G5120 Electromatic Hollowbody
Last edited by jamesmickanen at Mar 2, 2017,
#34
garrett999 Yes, now that Epiphone has made their acoustic only models solid tops, they should be worthy of much consideration in the price range.

Besides, that AJ-220 is a slope shoulder dreadnought, and who doesn't like the sound of those?
#35
AJ-220 reminds me of breedlove discovery concert, which is more expensive than Epiphone.
#36
Since there is apparently a lack of truth in advertising these days, especailly on the internet, the specifications posted on many guitar manufacturers website is not exactly truthful or complete enough anyways to pass on to others without being accused of speading misinformation.  

Takemine has not respond to my emails, so I am not really sure what kind of wood (i.e solid or laminated) that any of their guitars are of made.  Yamaha responded and said none of their guitar tops, backs or sides are made using solid woods, period.  Jasmine (i.e. KMC customer service) replied and said some of their guitars have solid wood tops, but that no other solid wood is used in any of their guitars tops, backs or sides.  

So when you see woods like mahogany, rosewood, sapele, nato, etc., it does not necessarily mean that is or isn't laminated.  And "select", which is an actual grade of wood throughout the lumber industry, is also now being used by some guitar manufacturers to apparently keep from using "laminated" in the advertising for their guitars.  The other guitar manufacturers that I contacted, mostly in the United States, such as Gibson, CF Martin,  Taylor, Fender, etc. actually do specify when and where laminated wood products are used in manufacturing their guitars.

While I would still recommend just about any of the inexpensive guitars mentioned in this thread for a good starter guitar, especially a Jasmine with a solid wood top (truly a great sounding inexpensive guitar), the manufacturer should be contacted, regardless of the make, to find out whether laminated wood products are used if that matters to you, because you can't rely  solely on the information advertised on their websites or on word of mouth advertising.

  
#37
Quote by tjfrench
Since there is apparently a lack of truth in advertising these days, especailly on the internet, the specifications posted on many guitar manufacturers website is not exactly truthful or complete enough anyways to pass on to others without being accused of speading misinformation.  

Takemine has not respond to my emails, so I am not really sure what kind of wood (i.e solid or laminated) that any of their guitars are of made.  Yamaha responded and said none of their guitar tops, backs or sides are made using solid woods, period.  Jasmine (i.e. KMC customer service) replied and said some of their guitars have solid wood tops, but that no other solid wood is used in any of their guitars tops, backs or sides.  

So when you see woods like mahogany, rosewood, sapele, nato, etc., it does not necessarily mean that is or isn't laminated.  And "select", which is an actual grade of wood throughout the lumber industry, is also now being used by some guitar manufacturers to apparently keep from using "laminated" in the advertising for their guitars.  The other guitar manufacturers that I contacted, mostly in the United States, such as Gibson, CF Martin,  Taylor, Fender, etc. actually do specify when and where laminated wood products are used in manufacturing their guitars.

While I would still recommend just about any of the inexpensive guitars mentioned in this thread for a good starter guitar, especially a Jasmine with a solid wood top (truly a great sounding inexpensive guitar), the manufacturer should be contacted, regardless of the make, to find out whether laminated wood products are used if that matters to you, because you can't rely  solely on the information advertised on their websites or on word of mouth advertising.

 

OK, I'm not "accusing you" of anything. I'm flatly stating you basically have no idea what you're talking about, specifically with respect to Yamaha, and on the larger whole. Here is a link to the Yamaha FG-800 on Yamaha's own website categorically stating the guitar has a solid top. http://usa.yamaha.com/products/musical-instruments/guitars-basses/ac-guitars/fg_fs/fg800/?mode=modelSo you, and whatever transient hire at Yamaha's customer service you spoke with, are claiming the company is lying, and has been about the FG-800 being a solid TOP, along with, I would presume, it's predecessor, the FG-700.

Enough is enough with you. You haven't posted one thing in your latest spiel, which isn't well known to the regulars here at UG, myself included.

It is possible that the top price guitars in the Jasmine line have solid tops, in the same stratified structure as the parent brand Takamine. That being said, the majority of Jasmines will have laminated tops. The same is true for Yamaha, they're all laminate UNTIL you get to the FG-800. In fact, I'd hazard a guess ,that a couple of their more expensive models could have laminate tops.

If a manufacturer states that a laminated guitar is "sapele, or "maple" or whatever wood species, it's understood, (by all but the most severely challenged posting here), that only the outer layer, (veneer), will absolutely be of the specified wood species. What's underneath is anybody's guess.

If all this is frustrating you, If you think you're right, you know what's really what, and the corporations are all lying in their advertising, I'd suggest taking it up with the FTC, and leave us the f*** alone.

And BTW, Epiphone claims that ALL their Masterbilt series are solid TOP, BACKS, and SIDES. Why not take a few days to straighten them out, and do report back to us about your ''adventure".
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 11, 2017,
#38
My last post wasn't for you Cranky Ass-Wipe, so don't bother wastin your time replying to any of my posts.  Just because you spend all of your time on this web site spewing a bunch of long ass stupid posts doesn't make you an authority on anything.  From what I can see, your nothing butt a troll trying to cause trouble.
#39
Quote by tjfrench
My last post wasn't for you Cranky Ass-Wipe, so don't bother wastin your time replying to any of my posts.  Just because you spend all of your time on this web site spewing a bunch of long ass stupid posts doesn't make you an authority on anything.  From what I can see, your nothing butt a troll trying to cause trouble.

Name calling is trolling Telling someone not to respond to your post is paranoid delusions of moderator-hood. It's not going tio happen. Post shit, you'll get shit, period. And BTW, while you were gone, nobody seemed to miss you.

There nothing in my response to you but accepted fact. Get over it.
#40
Quote by tjfrench
Since there is apparently a lack of truth in advertising these days, especailly on the internet, the specifications posted on many guitar manufacturers website is not exactly truthful or complete enough anyways to pass on to others without being accused of speading misinformation.  

Takemine has not respond to my emails, so I am not really sure what kind of wood (i.e solid or laminated) that any of their guitars are of made.  Yamaha responded and said none of their guitar tops, backs or sides are made using solid woods, period.  Jasmine (i.e. KMC customer service) replied and said some of their guitars have solid wood tops, but that no other solid wood is used in any of their guitars tops, backs or sides.  

So when you see woods like mahogany, rosewood, sapele, nato, etc., it does not necessarily mean that is or isn't laminated.  And "select", which is an actual grade of wood throughout the lumber industry, is also now being used by some guitar manufacturers to apparently keep from using "laminated" in the advertising for their guitars.  The other guitar manufacturers that I contacted, mostly in the United States, such as Gibson, CF Martin,  Taylor, Fender, etc. actually do specify when and where laminated wood products are used in manufacturing their guitars.

While I would still recommend just about any of the inexpensive guitars mentioned in this thread for a good starter guitar, especially a Jasmine with a solid wood top (truly a great sounding inexpensive guitar), the manufacturer should be contacted, regardless of the make, to find out whether laminated wood products are used if that matters to you, because you can't rely  solely on the information advertised on their websites or on word of mouth advertising.

 

First off, you are wrong. Yahama has some solid top woods guitars. Second, it is Takamine. They are like Martin. They have Solid wood guitars. They also have Solid tops/Laminated back and sides. They only have one model that all laminated and that the GD10.  Second being dick to one of the most respected posters in Acoustic Forum isn't getting yourself anywhere.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
Page 1 of 3