#1
someone told me i should get used to always holding my pick with the index and thumb only, for lead solos and strumming. 
but...i don't want too. i can't remember what he said as to why i should.
what do you think? does it matter? 
begginer geetarest.
#3
Is there a right or wrong way to hold the pick, well the answer is both yes and no. The index and thumb is the generally accepted way of holding pick, but that doesn't mean it's the only right way. Personally I think the best way of looking as it is that there's no wrong way of holding the pick so long as it doesn't hinder your playing ability to play or cause unnecessary tension / discomfort. 
For me personally I hold my pick with 2-3 fingers, depending on the situation. I have always found that 2 fingers doesn't give me the consistent stability I require so that 3rd finger comes and goes as a sort of stabiliser. Maybe it sounds weird, but not once has it ever been an issue for me and it causes no discomfort whatsoever, so for that reason I never felt a need to change it.
Last edited by vayne92 at Mar 17, 2017,
#4
Good technique promotes good playing. The smallest details can have an impact on how you play your instrument. That said, however, some of the most influential musicians have employed different techniques that go against what would be considered best practice. To paraphrase Vayne92, if it doesn't affect any aspect if your playing, you should be ok.
#5
I've grown used to using 3 fingers (thumb, index and middle). And it suits especially my strumming style. Works with leads and arpeggios too. But now and then I try with only 2 (thumb and bended index) like they teach to, and I have to admit it can be faster. There's more flexibility to the pick. 
The only problem is it's hard to learn out of accustomed ways... 
So I suggest learning both if you started with other than the basic 2-finger grip.
Music is the way.
#6
It might also depend on long term goals for playing. Overall I'd say if you are comfortable and able to play the material you want. Anything goes. If you are struggling trying to get maximum speed, string skipping, sweep arpeggios, etc. It couldn't hurt to at least examine other approaches.
#7
Eddie Van Halen holds his pick with thumb + middle finger, and taps with his index finger. 
Stevie Ray Vaughn held his picks "upside down" with the round side down... I'd say it's just whatever works best for you.
#8
Quote by PlusPaul
How are you holding it now?

index and middle finger together, with the thumb. 
begginer geetarest.
#10
Quote by timoel

So I suggest learning both if you started with other than the basic 2-finger grip.

sounds like a good idea. 
begginer geetarest.
#11
Quote by vayne92
Is there a right or wrong way to hold the pick, well the answer is both yes and no. The index and thumb is the generally accepted way of holding pick, but that doesn't mean it's the only right way. Personally I think the best way of looking as it is that there's no wrong way of holding the pick so long as it doesn't hinder your playing ability to play or cause unnecessary tension / discomfort. 
For me personally I hold my pick with 2-3 fingers, depending on the situation. I have always found that 2 fingers doesn't give me the consistent stability I require so that 3rd finger comes and goes as a sort of stabiliser. Maybe it sounds weird, but not once has it ever been an issue for me and it causes no discomfort whatsoever, so for that reason I never felt a need to change it.


+1

I personally loose hold of the pick with two fingers; that or it gets facing my palm and it doesn't have the ability to pick the string. The correct way to hold a pick is what helps you play correctly.
#12
Index and thumb   It take awhile to get used to playing with a pick...Just keep at it, and it should come naturally.
#13
Quote by johndala
Index and thumb   It take awhile to get used to playing with a pick...Just keep at it, and it should come naturally.


But also the "right" way is just a suggestion. Van Halen and Stevie Ray Vaughn played "wrong," and look where it got them.
#14
Quote by Lloyd_rogers
vayne92 doesn't cause me any discomfort or pain. 

As long as it allows you to play relaxed with a nice, straight line through your forearm and wrist then it shouldn't be an issue. The problems arise if you're having to bend your wrist to get the pick to reach the strings because that means there's unnecessary tension...that would happen if the pick was parallel to your thumb rather than perpendicular.
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#15
it's best to use two fingers. it doesn't matter which two as long as one of them is the thumb. it would actually be pretty awesome if you managed pinky and thumb. If you plan on tapping you want as many fingers free as possible.
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#16
Quote by AcousticMirror
it's best to use two fingers. it doesn't matter which two as long as one of them is the thumb. it would actually be pretty awesome if you managed pinky and thumb. If you plan on tapping you want as many fingers free as possible.


Just wondering, but why? I personally prefer three fingers, just because then I don't have to grip as tight. Is there a benefit to using two fingers?
#17
it doesn't really matter. you'll just need to get really fast at moving your pick in order to tap and hybrid finger style
buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo.
#18
It doesn't matter - there are a million ways to hold/grip a pick and there is no "right way" - the only downside I see from holding it with three fingers is that it will make hybrid picking harder, but that may not even be of interest to you.

Practice time will dictate how good you get at picking.  Watch Marty Friedman pick - it makes zero sense but it works for him!
#19
gogiregion  Yes I agree but all I can do is offer suggestions on my many years of playing.  You have to start somewhere, and go from there.  Another little problem might appear too.  Strumming.  With a pick its a whole new sound with loads of techniques on offer   But, it -a-come with a bit of practise.  I strum with my fingers , A pick and if I'm doing a bit of blues...my thumb.  I like all, and they each require there own little technique and offer different choices of playing for me.  It really comes down to practise, which should be fun anyway.
#20
Quote by AcousticMirror
it doesn't really matter. you'll just need to get really fast at moving your pick in order to tap and hybrid finger style


That makes sense. I've just gotten used to moving it quickly with my hand. I never thought about hybrid picking, although I have done it, and just took a finger away. I guess it's all just personal preference. I like thick picks and drop them a lot, so that might make gripping harder.
#21
Hold it how you want. If it works for you, then do it. I've heard and seen players hold it differently than what is considered traditional and it works for them. Some people hold it the other way around. Also some people pick with a weird hand position like Marty Friedman.. if it's comfortable.just do it..
#22
i play open and barre chords with some arpeggios, and working on some lead solos on my acoustic guitar. but not shred type solos.
begginer geetarest.
#23
Yes, there really is a right way. Just like there's a right way to position your fretting hand. That's really the only answer to this question. You can still be a decent guitarist with bad technique, but you will hit hard plateaus, I've known so many guitarists who've never been able to achieve what they wanted to achieve purely because they refused to sort out their technique. I used to hold my pick with three fingers, just like I used to hold my guitar neck like a cricket bat, and I can't tell you the amount of times I've had to completely redo my technique, which was a long, and rather boring experience, though it's since paid off. The advice I'll give, do it right from the start, that way you'll have less barriers to knock down when you get better.
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#24
Holding the pick with two hands, tweezers, or chopsticks is definitely the wrong way.

Quote by CelestialGuitar
just like I used to hold my guitar neck like a cricket bat,


Why would you hold the neck with two hands?
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Shut the mother#%$& up, $^%got. You have a #$%^ing terrible muther&@$#ing taste in %#$@ing music, @&%$ing movies and %&$#ing video games. Every time I see you on the forums, you are always saying something overrated and some $@&#ing sh*t. You are just mother$^@%ing ignorant as a whole.

Get a #%$@ing life or you will get banned for life.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Mar 25, 2017,
#25
Quote by theogonia777
Holding the pick with two hands, tweezers, or chopsticks is definitely the wrong way.  


Why would you hold the neck with two hands?

Gotta deal with Blues guitarists somehow 
Gear

Mesa Dual Rectifier
TC Electronic Polytune
T Rex MAB Overdrive
Boss NS-2
ESP Horizon NT See Thru Black (D Standard)

Celestial Wish on Youtube
#26
Hi
 
Grasp the pick in your strumming hand. Most people are most comfortable strumming and plucking a guitar with their dominant hand, while fingering specific notes and chords with their non-dominant hand. Hold the guitar, interact with it, and work out a grip that feels comfortable.
  • Place your non-dominant "fingering hand" along the neck of the guitar, with your thumb holding the back of the neck and your fingers resting on the strings. The strings should face away from you, roughly perpendicular to the ground. Rest the body of the guitar on your knee, or use a shoulder strap to play standing up.
  • Rest your arm on the top of the guitar--the curved ridge along the narrowest edge of the body--and swing your hand down to rest on the strings. If you're using an acoustic guitar, rest your fingers on the strings over the hold; if you're using an electric guitar, rest your fingers on the strings between the last fret and the pickup bar.
#27
Stick "Troy Grady" into Youtube, see if that helps- it's often more about arm hand or wrist movement
#28
Quote by zeropond
Hi
 
Grasp the pick in your strumming hand.


Hi.

personally I find grasping the pick with my fretting hand to work better.
Quote by Hal-Sephira
Shut the mother#%$& up, $^%got. You have a #$%^ing terrible muther&@$#ing taste in %#$@ing music, @&%$ing movies and %&$#ing video games. Every time I see you on the forums, you are always saying something overrated and some $@&#ing sh*t. You are just mother$^@%ing ignorant as a whole.

Get a #%$@ing life or you will get banned for life.
#29
I use to hold it with my thumb index and middle and I don't know how I managed to play at all. Now, I hold the pic between my thumb and the side of my index.
#30
I'm assuming you're holding it something like this
If you are, then yes, you should change. Holding a pick like this is not recommended as it less efficient, and makes angling the pick almost impossible unless you seriously contort your wrist. Just hold your hand in a relaxed, closed state, and wriggle your wrist; now so the same thing but with the way you hold the pick, you'll notice a much bigger turning radius that requires more energy, meaning you'll get tired quicker and you'll be less accurate. Some players like Misha Mansoor play like this, but even Misha knows that it's an inefficient technique that makes alternate picking more difficult. The recommended way is the norm because it's the most efficient and can accommodate just about any technique, players like EVH and SRV usually change their playing style for very specific reasons.

You really owe it to yourself to find a teacher. I know you're just trying to learn and that's fine, but you can only gather so much by asking in forums that are text only for every problem you come across in your playing. If you go to forums every time you have a question in your playing, you're gonna end up spending more time on forums than with your instrument. Just a few lessons will really help a lot with some of the more fundamental questions.
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#31
There is one right way (with slight variation) and at least 100 wrong ways. BUT the right way has only been really publicised in the Internet era. Before that, self taught guitarists held it many different ways and many famous (and excellent) pop / rock / blues guitarists hold it in different ways.

Check this out for the variations
http://www.fretjam.com/best-way-to-hold-a-guitar-pick.html

And this for unconventional ways
https://www.quora.com/Who-are-some-guitarists-that-dont-hold-the-pick-in-the-traditional-way

So, if you don't get on with the conventional way, stick to the way you like it (or get rid of it all together).