Poll: Have you done stuff like that (read post)?
Poll Options
View poll results: Have you done stuff like that (read post)?
Yes
22 37%
No
22 37%
I don't pay attention to my playing enough to know
3 5%
I don't own a tube amp
13 22%
Voters: 60.
Page 1 of 5
#1
I know this sounds elitist, but I legitimately hate using anything without at least one tube in it. I only have the Micro Terror, and I've already gotten into habits that show that I rely on tubes.

I won't start on the fact that I don't really like solid state distortion.

I've noticed before that when playing an electric acoustically, I pick harder when I'm playing something that uses overdrive as if I was playing on a tube amp where you pick harder for more drive.

That's just one example (it also goes the other way around), but I can't be the only one to do stuff like this, right?
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#2
Depending on the gig, I play as much (or more) with a clean setting than an overdriven setting so for me an S/S amp works well for my needs but if I always (or nearly always) played with overdrive/distortion, I might want a tube amp. Currently I am playing with the BOSS Katana 100 and it has excellent cleans and when needed very nice distortions and overdrives. I don't think there is one amp that is perfect for everything but the Katana currently covers a lot of my needs. I have to balance my gear with what works best in all playing situations.

I don't think your comment is so much "elitist", it really just reflects your own taste in tone based on the genre of music you play so it's OK.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 22, 2017,
#3
Rickholly74

There are solid state amps that take dirt pedals fine- exhibit #1: Quilters- usually ones that aren't modeling amps.
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Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#4
i absolutely hate tube amps

that's coming from a bass/logistic perspective more than anything though, and as someone who thinks distortion should be kept to a minimum. i don't see any reason to play a guitar through anything but a bass amp or through a FRFR PA-type setup with a DI, really.

i think part of it might be that you're playing low level amps, in which case yeah, a crappy tube amp will sound better than a crappy solid state amp
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Last edited by Hail at May 22, 2017,
#5
tolerate is a bit strong, but yeah i definitely have a pretty massive preference for tube amps.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#6
Quote by Dave_Mc
tolerate is a bit strong, but yeah i definitely have a pretty massive preference for tube amps.


Good point. I kindof exaggerated a little bit. Though I wasn't lying about habits that have formed that only work on tube amps (and plugged in).

Quote by Hail
i absolutely hate tube amps

that's coming from a bass/logistic perspective more than anything though, and as someone who thinks distortion should be kept to a minimum. i don't see any reason to play a guitar through anything but a bass amp or through a FRFR PA-type setup with a DI, really.

i think part of it might be that you're playing low level amps, in which case yeah, a crappy tube amp will sound better than a crappy solid state amp


I personally think distortion should be kept low, but tube amps get a much better touch sensitive overdrive IMO.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#7
Quote by gogiregion
Good point. I kindof exaggerated a little bit. Though I wasn't lying about habits that have formed that only work on tube amps (and plugged in).


those things generally work on non-tube amps too, but they do tend to work better with tube amps (in general).
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#8
Quote by Dave_Mc
those things generally work on non-tube amps too, but they do tend to work better with tube amps (in general).


That's what I meant. On another part I said more touch sensitive, but I guess I screwed up that time.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#9
For low volume practicing digital amps are great - they can actually sound better than a tube amp if your playing at really low volumes ( i.e. apartment building volumes). 

However, at jamming or gig volume levels those amps fall apart completely in most cases.  I  played through the new Line 6 at a friend's place a while back and I was blown away at how terrible it sounded - the other guitarist had a stock AC15, hardly a great tube amp, and he smoked the tone - it was not close - not even a little. 

Solid states, from Peavey mostly,  were solely responsible for every guitarist born without rich parents having shitty tone through the 80's and 90's - tone was bleak back then - Metal Zone's and other Boss pedals through solid states everywhere.  It was like the great depression of tone. People today have no idea how good they have just being able to play through a Roland Cube or a Fender Mustang as a beginner.
#10
Quote by reverb66
For low volume practicing digital amps are great - they can actually sound better than a tube amp if your playing at really low volumes ( i.e. apartment building volumes). 

However, at jamming or gig volume levels those amps fall apart completely in most cases.  I  played through the new Line 6 at a friend's place a while back and I was blown away at how terrible it sounded - the other guitarist had a stock AC15, hardly a great tube amp, and he smoked the tone - it was not close - not even a little. 

Solid states, from Peavey mostly,  were solely responsible for every guitarist born without rich parents having shitty tone through the 80's and 90's - tone was bleak back then - Metal Zone's and other Boss pedals through solid states everywhere.  It was like the great depression of tone. People today have no idea how good they have just being able to play through a Roland Cube or a Fender Mustang as a beginner.


That's probably true. Although the cheap solid state that I got free with my first guitar was actually pretty good (considering that it was $35 and solid state).
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#11
how do you like the micro terror? Ive been considering picking one up for my house since the amp i currently run is much too loud. The volume sits at like 1 and anything louder is over powering. I think there are a lot of great solid state amps out there. Id love to run all tubes all the time but im too broke with buying new guitars.
#12
Quote by gogiregion
That's what I meant. On another part I said more touch sensitive, but I guess I screwed up that time.


no worries
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#13
Still not sure if this is the right subforum for this but whatever it brings some discussion.

Agree with Hail, though we're both bassists - and getting tubes for a bass amp is a waste of effort.

As to whether or not this sounds elitist, well it doesn't since literally everyone thinks like that. Tubes just have a nice, warm breakup that sounds great with the electric guitar. However, "I don't like using anything that doesn't have at least one tube in it" sounds kind of too much, considering that tubes are a complete marketing gimmick and manufacturers put them into anything from reverb pedals to freaking guitar picks probably and people buy this stuff because everyone is under the impression that just because your OD or delay pedal has a tube in it it magically has better tone. It really makes no difference if your OD has a single, small tube in it or no tube.

So for guitar amps, tubes legitimately sound good because of the nature of tube breakup, but for anything else like multieffects or delay pedals or whatever they're pretty much a marketing gimmick.
Quote by Jet Penguin
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Quote by Hail
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#14
^ yeah pretty much. the amp has to be a certain amount tube for the tubes really to make much of a difference- it pains me to say it, but you're probably talking blackstar amounts, where both the preamp and power amp have a fair amount of tubeyness in them. while i don't agree with some guitarists who act like only the power amp is the important bit, with things like the marshall valvestates which have only got one token tube in the preamp, you might as well spit.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#15
Quote by N8dagreat3
how do you like the micro terror? Ive been considering picking one up for my house since the amp i currently run is much too loud. The volume sits at like 1 and anything louder is over powering. I think there are a lot of great solid state amps out there. Id love to run all tubes all the time but im too broke with buying new guitars.


I likr the Micro Terror. It's a great practice amp. If you are looking to gig I would recommend the Tiny Terror or Vox Night Train instead. Those two can get a lot louder because of their tube power sections. The MT does certainly get a good crunch tone even with only one tube. It was designed to sound as much like a Tiny Terror as possible with a SS power section. It is great. I'm going to upgrade, but the MT is an excellent first tube amp. It's more because I kind of have that personally where I just always want something better.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#16
Honestly you don't hear much about SS amps often in professional rigs, but Kempers are starting to replace amps these days for many people. It depends on what you play and what tone you like really.
Last edited by GuitarHawk99 at May 23, 2017,
#17
I haven't checked out what solid states do lately, but I'll only buy tubes for the stage. Solid is fine for sparkly clean tone, but if you want any kind of dirt you should either buy a tube amp or really nice solid state. There's definitely interaction between the pedals and the preamp tubes, and if you want really authentic vintage sound you have to push the tubes to distort naturally. That's just hard to model, and if you're spending a lot on a solid state to simulate tube sound, it ought to do something else special, such as model multiple amps or cool effects.

Hail  yeah, every pro bassist I know can carry their rig in a lunch box. I sometimes consider running my amp DI to save the volume and space difficulties on stage, but I also think having the sound present on stage enhances the show. I've also thought about getting something like a Tiny Terror. But all digital DI doesn't take overdrive very well.
Last edited by cdgraves at May 24, 2017,
#18
Quote by cdgraves


Hail  yeah, every pro bassist I know can carry their rig in a lunch box. I sometimes consider running my amp DI to save the volume and space difficulties on stage, but I also think having the sound present on stage enhances the show. I've also thought about getting something like a Tiny Terror. But all digital DI doesn't take overdrive very well.


my stage rig is a carvin AC300 and right now i'm just running an EBS microbass II DI through it. i've had guitarists run through it and it sounds absolutely killer compared to their tones through lower level tube heads, but YMMV. my idea of tone is different from a lot of guitarists, as well, cause i want a pristine clean tone with minimal grit. FWIW, my next instrument is going to be a guitar, but it's gonna be a surfcaster.

i'm waiting with bated breath for the trace elliot pre-amps too so i can finally start bi (or tri) amping again like i did when i had my N/S Stick
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#19
Quote by GuitarHawk99
Honestly you don't hear much about SS amps often in professional rigs, but Kempers are starting to replace amps these days for many people. It depends on what you play and what tone you like really.


Depends on the genre. You see a fair amount of jazz players using SS amps, for instance.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#20
cdgraves

Quilter amps do a pretty good job of sounding "tube-y", IMHO, and take dirt pedals just fine. Not exorbitant, either.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#21
Hail How's the EBS? I need to update my live rig since I got a nice part in a local musical, and I'm thinking about going the DI route. Microbass II's are very common in the used market around here, so it would be an obvious choice.

GuitarHawk99 Yeah and the thing is, that a majority of guitarists would probably have no idea whether or not the amp they're playing is the real thing or a Kemper in a blind test, and even if you did the audience definitely does not notice or care. They're easy to use and sound great, so I think it's a good thing we're doing some innovation on that front.
Quote by Jet Penguin
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Quote by Hail
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#22
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Depends on the genre. You see a fair amount of jazz players using SS amps, for instance.


Solid States do great cleans. The only thing that I could see valves doing better is that power amp compression, or that ever so slight dirt that makes it sound richer, but a good compressor and a well made solid state amp will do that. I think the reason I liked that one solid state amp I got with my first guitar had a little bit ov overdrive when you turned it up loud, and the overdrive channel was identical to the clean channel but instead had a bit of a boost. It was also pretty touch sensitive. Not as touch sensitive as my Micro Terror, but still was good. I bet that there is some kind of really high quality SS amp that's like that.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#23
Quote by Kevätuhri

GuitarHawk99 Yeah and the thing is, that a majority of guitarists would probably have no idea whether or not the amp they're playing is the real thing or a Kemper in a blind test, and even if you did the audience definitely does not notice or care. They're easy to use and sound great, so I think it's a good thing we're doing some innovation on that front.


While I think it's a good idea not to forget the audience so as not to miss the wood for the trees (assuming you actually gig ), I'm not sure I'm 100% convinced by the "audience won't notice" argument- taken to its logical extreme, you could use the same argument to argue for wearing shoes that don't fit, for example!

Also I'm not sure it's wise to underestimate the audience- sure, if they don't play, they won't care what gear you're using, most likely, but they'll still likely be able to tell if you sound good or not.

Don't get me wrong, I'm all for innovation on the modelling front. Just as cdgraves suggested above, if you have to spend as much on a good solid state or modeller as would actually just buy you that good tube amp which you know is going to work...
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#24
Dave_Mc I would understand your argument if we were comparing a cheap, small modelling amp to a high-end tube amp, but I was talking about units like Kemper and Axe FX, and yes, I am pretty sure that not even the musicians in the audience would notice that the amps are modellers. I did not mean to generalize that the audience wouldn't notice anything, but I was talking specifically about the Kemper mentioned before. And afaik they sound so close to a real amp that I doubt using one would irk the listeners in any way
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#25
That may well be true. I guess I skimmed your post too quickly and didn't realise you were exclusively referring to those high-end modellers.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#26
Quote by Kevätuhri
Dave_Mc I would understand your argument if we were comparing a cheap, small modelling amp to a high-end tube amp, but I was talking about units like Kemper and Axe FX, and yes, I am pretty sure that not even the musicians in the audience would notice that the amps are modellers. I did not mean to generalize that the audience wouldn't notice anything, but I was talking specifically about the Kemper mentioned before. And afaik they sound so close to a real amp that I doubt using one would irk the listeners in any way


That's definitely true. I personally would still use tubes for two reasons, though. One: Volume (although the highest end solid states get almost as loud). Two: I feel like a hipster bada** to use tubes. It's fun to say my amp has valves/vacuum tubes and someone has no idea what that is, and then you explain that it's what computers used back in the 50s.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#27
Quote by gogiregion
That's definitely true. I personally would still use tubes for two reasons, though. One: Volume (although the highest end solid states get almost as loud). Two: I feel like a hipster bada** to use tubes. It's fun to say my amp has valves/vacuum tubes and someone has no idea what that is, and then you explain that it's what computers used back in the 50s.



I feel like you have a poor understanding of electronics if you think SS amps can't get as loud as a tube amp.


Personally. I use whatever sounds good to me. I have used VSTs, I have used many tube amps and higher end modellers and now I have a nice modeller and an older tube combo. I'm not gonna lie though, the tube combo barely gets any use anymore because my modeller can do what the amp does but without me having to be stupid loud and without me having to set up a bunch of mics and crap to record my tones.
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#28
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I feel like you have a poor understanding of electronics if you think SS amps can't get as loud as a tube amp.


Personally. I use whatever sounds good to me. I have used VSTs, I have used many tube amps and higher end modellers and now I have a nice modeller and an older tube combo. I'm not gonna lie though, the tube combo barely gets any use anymore because my modeller can do what the amp does but without me having to be stupid loud and without me having to set up a bunch of mics and crap to record my tones.


Can't tubes be pushed harder resulting in more wattage than labeled? That's what I meant. A 50 watt tube amp could get up past 100 and some could get up to 150, whereas a 50 watt SS would have a max of 50. Is that wrong? A watt is a watt, but tubes can put out more watts than labeled.

Edit: Changed it to sound a little less arrogant. It didn't quite sound like what I meant.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
Last edited by gogiregion at May 24, 2017,
#29
Quote by gogiregion
Can't tubes be pushed harder resulting in more wattage than labeled? If so, that's what I meant. A 50 watt tube amp could get up past 100 and some could get up to 150, whereas a 50 watt SS would have a max of 50. Is that wrong? A watt is a watt, but tubes can put out more watts than labeled.


Sure, tube amps can output more wattage than advertised once they start to clip but that doesnt mean they are louder when all things are equal.
Quote by zgr0826
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#30
the Fender twin reverb has been my amp of choice..with custom speakers..just using the clean channel full vol and adjust it on the guitar..add a couple of pedals push the vol up and tone down and it get nice and crunchy..so anywhere between telecaster country chimey to muddy jimi

I have not met a SS that can do that without a lot of alterations and still sound good
play well

wolf
#31
Back in the mid 90's I bought a Phillips DCC (Digital Cassette Deck). This was the competitor to the DAT (Digital Audio Tape). It was a very expensive purchase for me at the time but I could now mix my 16 track reel to reel tapes in digital form instead of doing my mixing/mastering on my Revox A77 reel to reel. That was a dream come true (or so I thought).  After a few weeks I began compare the digital mixes to the same analog mixes. The analog seemed better, fuller, fatter, smoother. While I continued to archive my mixes on the digital deck I used the reel to reel mixes as my main mixing/mastering medium. As it turns out, I now know that both early digital DCC and DAT decks suffered from low sampling rates, low bit rates plus other issues. But it was the best technology of the time. These digital shortcomings were all solved in the coming years and today few if anyone mixes to analog reel to reel.

I use this story only as an analogy. If I had abandoned the digital medium based on the older technology of the 90's I would have missed the fantastic digital advancements in recording that we have today and still be using my analog tape decks (which I still own). Things change, technology advances and digital technology has advanced a lot in both audio and amp technology. There are a number of excellent S/S amps produced in the last few years. To say "I will never use anything but a tube amp" sounds a little short sighted and limiting. Just my opinion.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#32
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Sure, tube amps can output more wattage than advertised once they start to clip but that doesnt mean they are louder when all things are equal.


So tubes pushed to their max can't get louder than transistors pushed to their max? Electronically, tubes can be pushed harder, but you can spread the load out. Is it just a myth that tube amps dirty will out-volume a SS amp? I thought that that was true. Maybe not.

Quote by wolflen
the Fender twin reverb has been my amp of choice..with custom speakers..just using the clean channel full vol and adjust it on the guitar..add a couple of pedals push the vol up and tone down and it get nice and crunchy..so anywhere between telecaster country chimey to muddy jimi

I have not met a SS that can do that without a lot of alterations and still sound good


That sounds amazing. There definitely are SS that can sound good, even great, but a Twin Reverb is one of the best sounds out there IMO. It's way out of my budget, though.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#33
Quote by Rickholly74
Back in the mid 90's I bought a Phillips DCC (Digital Cassette Deck). This was the competitor to the DAT (Digital Audio Tape). It was a very expensive purchase for me at the time but I could now mix my 16 track reel to reel tapes in digital form instead of doing my mixing/mastering on my Revox A77 reel to reel. That was a dream come true (or so I thought).  After a few weeks I began compare the digital mixes to the same analog mixes. The analog seemed better, fuller, fatter, smoother. While I continued to archive my mixes on the digital deck I used the reel to reel mixes as my main mixing/mastering medium. As it turns out, I now know that both early digital DCC and DAT decks suffered from low sampling rates, low bit rates plus other issues. But it was the best technology of the time. These digital shortcomings were all solved in the coming years and today few if anyone mixes to analog reel to reel.

I use this story only as an analogy. If I had abandoned the digital medium based on the older technology of the 90's I would have missed the fantastic digital advancements in recording that we have today and still be using my analog tape decks (which I still own). Things change, technology advances and digital technology has advanced a lot in both audio and amp technology. There are a number of excellent S/S amps produced in the last few years. To say "I will never use anything but a tube amp" sounds a little short sighted and limiting. Just my opinion.


That is true. If I had infinite money, I would definitely buy a Roland JC. They definitely are great. I wouldn't limit myself to tubes, although honestly, at my budgets, I wouldn't be getting super far in the SS department. I would be looking in the Tiny Terror and Night Train range. Maybe there's something I'm missing, but I really like the sounds of those amps, and it would take a lot to change my mind. Different people different tastes. I would probably prefer the Night Train over an AC-30, which the 50 watt NT is around that price (of the AC-30 reissue, IIRC), but a lot of people would disagree. Where am I going with this? I have no idea. I guess that in the low price range, tubes reign supreme, but are probably on equal or similar footing up with budgets around $2,000. If I make any sense and don't sound like some tednage girl spitting out a bunch of words like what's going on in this post. I don't think I'm making sense.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#34
Maybe it's cuz I've never owned one, but I've never played a tube amp at a friends or at a store that just blew me away as far as how it reacts to my playing. I've played a solid state amp with pedals for about 5 years now and I'm content to use pedals and a clean amp forever. I like the features of nice tube amps, but until recently nobody except Randall really made pro SS amps. Now that pro SS amps have the same features, I'll probably stick with SS til I experience some difference between good SS and good tubes.
 
#35
Quote by !..!_Rock_!..!
Maybe it's cuz I've never owned one, but I've never played a tube amp at a friends or at a store that just blew me away as far as how it reacts to my playing. I've played a solid state amp with pedals for about 5 years now and I'm content to use pedals and a clean amp forever. I like the features of nice tube amps, but until recently nobody except Randall really made pro SS amps. Now that pro SS amps have the same features, I'll probably stick with SS til I experience some difference between good SS and good tubes.
 


And that's definitely a viable option. It all comes down to personal preference. I personally like having a tube amp, and maybe an overdrive (though I'm planning on getting a Clapton mid boost, so I won't need an overdrive). Some people prefer using exclusively tubes, some like clean tubes and overdrive, some like just SS amp, some like clean SS with overdrive. And there's also so many other options. There are hybrid amps that use at least one SS gain stage to get a tighter metal sound (like the DSL-40 and I think some Mesas). There are so many good options nowadays that people should experiment. Some people don't even realize that the DSL uses that (it's only on ultra gain). It's just my personal preference to use tubes. Opinions differ, or else everyone would have the same amp, guitar, favorite genre, and it would get really boring. I honestly didn't mean to come off as elitist as I did. I was just wondering if other people have the same preference and as strong as me. I'm actually ranting more at myself than anyone else right now for not being clear enough. I actually hate the mentality that I've been coming off as, and that's completely my fault (but don't worry mods, I'm not suicidal right now. I've made a promise with my partner that I wouldn't do anything like that anymore, and they won't either).
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#36
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail How's the EBS? I need to update my live rig since I got a nice part in a local musical, and I'm thinking about going the DI route. Microbass II's are very common in the used market around here, so it would be an obvious choice.


it's really nice, especially if you're running 2 live basses and want a quick switch. i had to get it new, though, and honestly if i were in the market now i would probably put the money towards the darkglass alpha/omega, but part of that is because i want to get the trace elliot transit B. it has a dry out, so i can run that preamp clean with compression and such, then run the dry-out into another preamp+effects loop.

for a standalone, though, i've gotten tons of compliments at gigs (though it's mostly from the sound guy lol). if it wasn't like, $400 when i grabbed it i'd probably be totally happy, so if you can get it for $200-250 USD, it's a steal
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
Last edited by Hail at May 24, 2017,
#37
At the end of the day I think this all comes down to budget. If you can drop $1500 USD on an amp, you're gonna have a hard time buying a bad one of any sort. Decent, stageworthy tube amps start around $400, so I think that middle price range is where tubes are generally superior. If I could only own one amp and had $500 to spend, I'd probably go for a used Fender or Mesa/Boogie.

There's also a point to be made about just using a digital signal into an amp. Lots of payers use a digital console for pre-programmed sounds, and run it into an actual amp. That would give you the modeling ability in addition to the analog sound of a tube amp with pedals. Those consoles are expensive of course, but so are really good modeling amps.
#38
Both are fine, but I've never played a tube amp that stole my opinion on this. Most, if not all tube amps I've played are WAY more expensive than the solid-state counterparts as well. 
#39
Quote by gogiregion
So tubes pushed to their max can't get louder than transistors pushed to their max? Electronically, tubes can be pushed harder, but you can spread the load out. Is it just a myth that tube amps dirty will out-volume a SS amp? I thought that that was true. Maybe not.

Yes and no. There's a lot of variables at work in comparing the two. ( not sure what you mean by "spread the load out")

To keep it as simple as possible, with the the least tech jargon, an amps output is usually measured by inputting a signal of specific voltage and frequency.
The output is measured with respect to the total amount of harmonic distortion present. These measurements set a fairly level playing field for comparison between different amps. However, different manufacturers do like to fudge their figures a bit.
A valve or tube works a lot different to a transistor , the tube being basically a voltage amplifier and the transistor a current amplifier.

There are a lot of different valves, types of transistors, and they all have there own characteristics, coupled with circuit design.

A transistor transitions into distortion fairly abruptly whereas a valve saturates with a gentler curve.
Distortion from the output of a SS amp is a speaker killer and sounds harsh, due to voltage rail clamping, which is why top end amps have output protection. 
Due to the output transformer action with valve amps, the voltage can actually increase, and there is no DC speaker killing voltage present.
Valves and transistors also have different distortion harmonics present, even vs odd order.
Also, due to the way our ears work, we generally perceive a distorting valve output to be louder than an equal wattage SS amp due to the compression and harmonic characteristics.

This is actually a massive subject, but basically, if you have an SS amp next to a tube amp, and they both put out the same power at a specific set of measurements, usually below clipping or saturating, pushing the SS amp further will cause voltage clamping flat line, whereas the tube amp can happily go further, at the expense of increased distortion.
 
Of course, if you want louder clean from either amp, just get a bigger one, or double up. Who doesn't like a massive row of stacked tube amps?  

As to which I prefer, I like both. Different tools for different jobs. 

I always prefer Tube amps for live, but have used a PC with an amp sim and impulse responses.
I do all my recording with amp sims (digital and SS I guess), I can't even get close to the sound with a real valve amp, would need massive amounts of volume and a well set up room.
It's pretty hard to tell the difference nowadays.
#40
Quote by Vreid
Yes and no. There's a lot of variables at work in comparing the two. ( not sure what you mean by "spread the load out")

To keep it as simple as possible, with the the least tech jargon, an amps output is usually measured by inputting a signal of specific voltage and frequency.
The output is measured with respect to the total amount of harmonic distortion present. These measurements set a fairly level playing field for comparison between different amps. However, different manufacturers do like to fudge their figures a bit.
A valve or tube works a lot different to a transistor , the tube being basically a voltage amplifier and the transistor a current amplifier.

There are a lot of different valves, types of transistors, and they all have there own characteristics, coupled with circuit design.

A transistor transitions into distortion fairly abruptly whereas a valve saturates with a gentler curve.
Distortion from the output of a SS amp is a speaker killer and sounds harsh, due to voltage rail clamping, which is why top end amps have output protection. 
Due to the output transformer action with valve amps, the voltage can actually increase, and there is no DC speaker killing voltage present.
Valves and transistors also have different distortion harmonics present, even vs odd order.
Also, due to the way our ears work, we generally perceive a distorting valve output to be louder than an equal wattage SS amp due to the compression and harmonic characteristics.

This is actually a massive subject, but basically, if you have an SS amp next to a tube amp, and they both put out the same power at a specific set of measurements, usually below clipping or saturating, pushing the SS amp further will cause voltage clamping flat line, whereas the tube amp can happily go further, at the expense of increased distortion.
 
Of course, if you want louder clean from either amp, just get a bigger one, or double up. Who doesn't like a massive row of stacked tube amps?  

As to which I prefer, I like both. Different tools for different jobs. 

I always prefer Tube amps for live, but have used a PC with an amp sim and impulse responses.
I do all my recording with amp sims (digital and SS I guess), I can't even get close to the sound with a real valve amp, would need massive amounts of volume and a well set up room.
It's pretty hard to tell the difference nowadays.


That's a good way of describing it. I probably would understand the tech jargon, but that information is so good that it should be used to explain to everyone wondering. I personally like the sound of power amp distortion, so I would personally like to keep the wattage low, but that's just me. That's what I meant, although both tubes and transistors have a point in which they blow, and for tubes that threshold is higher, but I digress.

Edit: What I meant by "spread the load out" was to add more to a power section to raise wattage. For example the Tiny Terror uses 2 power tubes, and the Duel Terror uses 4.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
Last edited by gogiregion at May 25, 2017,
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