#3
Np problem, a decent guitar tech or luthier will be able to fix it (at a price, of cause). Wood is wood and can always be mended with glue that is stronger than the wood itself. But how did you manage to break it?
#4
Looks like you'll need a new fretboard. The board snapped clean in half right where a fret slot would be, so being able to reglue that neck in such a way as to ensure that fret slot was tight enough to hold the fret in place would be extremely difficult.

The binding obviously needs to be peeled off and glued back onto the new board, using acetone to remelt the binding together where it has snapped in two.

The answer is yes, it can be fixed. But its gonna cost way more than what that instrument instrumentals is likely worth. You'll be better off just buying a new guitar and converting the body of the old one into a birdhouse.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#5
Thanks all! Broke it in an uncharacteristic bout of drunken rage - yep, I'm an idiot. I\ve contacted the manufacturer to price a new neck. Can anyone give a rough ball park figure for repair? And how much would it cost to hire someone to attach a new fretboard? 
#6
It totally depends on who you're asking, and the competence of their work but it'll likely cost you at least $600 to fix that. If that's anywhere near what the guitar is actually worth, the better solution is just to buy a new guitar and learn your lesson.

Good luck getting the manufacturer to sell you a new neck. Manufacturers almost never sell necks to actual customers. The usual answer is if you want a new neck, you buy a new guitar. Not the answer you want to hear, but that's the price you pay for being stupid.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#7
I honestly think with a good luthier and you shop around you could get it fixed for less than $600. I had the headstock of my guitar break right off one time and I was thinking it would cost me an arm and a leg but was only $95 canadian. Although it wasn't as bad as that one so it will definately be more than my boo boo.
#8
get some good strong wood glue and a spirt level  the hard part is keeping the neck straight while the glue sets , not sure if the trust rod will be damaged - but if  your not going to pay for it to be fix might as well have a go .
#10
i wouldnt bother paying someone to fix it with the possibility that it will never be the same.  btw, you need to quit drinking.
#11
It can be fixed but it's going to need the neck removed and, as mentioned earlier, a new fretboard would be advisable.  If you are removing the neck and the fretboard It's actually more work than carving a new neck.  If it were my guitar and I loved it I would replace the neck.  If it is a particularly valuable guitar I would replace the neck.  If it is a more affordable guitar and/or I wasn't particularly attached to it I would get a new guitar.  If you are short on cash and have the skillset to fix something like this then the neck could be repaired and all you would need to buy would be a bit of wood for a new fretboard and some fretwire but I would only go about fixing the neck (rather than replacing the neck) if I had a time but no money.
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#12
Quote by The_Crank3
I honestly think with a good luthier and you shop around you could get it fixed for less than $600. I had the headstock of my guitar break right off one time and I was thinking it would cost me an arm and a leg but was only $95 canadian. Although it wasn't as bad as that one so it will definately be more than my boo boo.

There a a huge difference between this break and a broken headstock.  This involves removing the neck, binding, and fretboard.  Then gluing the neck back together, making a new fretboard, gluing the fretboard on, making sure the fretboard is level, installing frets, making sure the old nut still matches the height of the new fretboard, then doing a fret dressing.  If you want the new fretboard to be bound like the old one there is even more work involved.  Once the neck is fixed you still need to reattach it with the proper angle.  A headstock snapping off just needs some clamps and some glue and would be an incredibly easy fix.
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Last edited by CorduroyEW at Jul 16, 2017,