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#1
Hi people,

I'm researching for a video and would love some ideas. I'm looking for the dumbest questions that have ever been asked by guitarists-in-training.
Not looking to name and shame, just looking to answer the kinds of questions we might not want to admit we used to ask.

For example, I remember reading, on this very forum, "can someone write down all the power chords for me?"

Any suggestions are welcome. Ta.
#2
I sometime teach intermediate to advanced players..and the questions asked sometime are very basic theory concepts other times beyond my ability to to answer--AKA I don't know--

I do remember learning about guitar and music..and all the questions I had..so in the overview, all serious questions (on any subject/topic) are valid and are asked to help that person learn..in that context the only "dumb" question..is the one not asked..

now away from that format..would be the rhetorical and obvious reply to a "dumb" question..."the house is on fire..should I call 911??"
play well

wolf
#4
i think the dumbest question i've ever heard is "how can i rip off Jared Dines"
Quote by Kevätuhri
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You win. I'm done here.
#5
something I observed at a guitar shop (not GC), a mother with her teenage son

"I just bought this guitar and a string already broke"

employee "aaaand"

"you'll need to replace the guitar - he can't play the guitar with the string missing, they should make these stronger, such a rip off"

employee "oooor you could buy a new set of strings"

paraphrased of course, but that was pretty much it, and I was mind blown.
"I definitely don’t write all my music in a blackout, like I used to, although I did come up with some good stuff in a blackout."
-Matt Fucking Pike
#6
"How do I use modes?"
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#7
Quote by Kevätuhri
"How do I use modes?"

So, every other thread in MT?
Skip the username, call me Billy
#8
There is a whole class of dumb questions right here in this forum, the answers to which would come from picking up a guitar and spending a few seconds finding out.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#9
Quote by liam177lewis
wolflen
Let me rephrase - "Questions which seem embarrassing with the benefit of experience, but which might likely be asked by a beginner"


ok...thats good

"how can a G chord be in more than one key?" and the realization that the explanation has to make sense to the beginner
play well

wolf
#10
How about arrogant condescending answers to these questions for balance? 
#12
Quote by opiekundps2015
If You need help,then help yourself 

If You need help,then help yourself (main principle of forum).I know how to help you but I will not help you
(because you will not learn anything if I will teach you something )

Are you being serious or are you making fun of me?
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
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Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#13
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Are you being serious or are you making fun of me?


I don't know, but he is a neo-Nazi and you speak English fluently so you shouldn't pay him much mind.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#14
Quote by opiekundps2015
If You need help,then help yourself 

This isn't even a question m8.

This thread makes me recall an ancient chinese proverb of infinite wisdom.

"There are no dumb questions, only dumb guitarists".
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#15
Quote by Kevätuhri
This isn't even a question m8.

This thread makes me recall an ancient chinese proverb of infinite wisdom.

"There are no dumb questions, only dumb guitarists".


"How many halves are there in a basketball game?"
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#16
Q: Is this the pentecostal scale?

A: No it is the apostolic scale!
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
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Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#18
is mayonnaise an instrument
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#19
Quote by diabolical
How about bassist questions?

The most commonly asked one I've noticed during my band's auditions for bassist was:
"I don't play chords, so please tell me the root note"


you know the chords for your songs? i wish i was auditioning for your band. it's always "figure out all our music by ear before you even show up"
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#21
Quote by ArturPr
Why am I?


it broke
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#22
I'm still curious these questions:

"Is finger tone a thing?"
"what does 'sounding heavy' mean?"
"whats a piezo?"
Lastly, "does it djent?"
Gear:
- ESP LTD MH-50
- Strandberg OS 7
- A cheap fender strat knock-off not worth naming
- Garageband
- Boss GT-1
- Potato
#23
Back when I got my first general servicing/tune up on my first electric I once asked my local luthier "so do all guitars have that or is it just mine?" in regards to my then Kramer Striker's truss rod. The fucking truss rod. 
Charvel So-Cal (SH6TB/N, killswitch), Jackson RR5FR (TB6/Jazz, Drop C). Joyo pxl pro.
Loop1=Crybaby from hell, Boss PS-5, Seymour Duncan 805 or Green Rhino, EQD Hoof or Earthbound Audio Super Collider. Loop 1 into ISP Decimator II.
Loop 2 (FX loop)-Line6 M9, TC Spark Mini. Loop 2 into mxr 10band. All into a Peavey Triple XXX 212, Ibanez IL15.
Last edited by Maidenheadsteve at Jul 12, 2017,
#24
It's not really a question, but it was a funny moment from a guy who has been playing a Gibson SG for like 5 years, always has the toggle switch on the neck pickup.
He wanted to try a solo and I said, 'It might sound even better if you switch to the bridge pickup.'
He moved his picking hand further towards the bridge...  
Hooper drives the boat chief...
#25
Why are guitar tabs upside-down?
#26
It's not a question but...when I was around 11, I was just starting out with guitar, I wasn't very good at speaking English (or writing or whatever, you know what I mean), and I kept watching guitars on music stores online, I would watch the most expensive Gibsons (lol) because I thought they looked really cool and shit

There was this very expensive and ugly as fuck Gibson that had "Appetite for Destruction" in it's name, I didn't know AFD was a GnR album then, and like I said, I wasn't very good at English. For a very long time I thought that guitar was made and sold to be smashed, and had a button on it that would make it explode.

I was later corrected by my step-cousin who was into classic rock bands
#27
Quote by Gosss
Why are guitar tabs upside-down?

I thought this when I first started using them.  Don't remember ever getting an answer (or even asking anyone the question), but I got over it.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
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#30
Quote by Gosss
Why are guitar tabs upside-down?


when you're looking down at your fretboard, that's the way it shows up. it's a stupid system, but so are tabs, so
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#31
Hail Why do you think tabs are a stupid system? This is a serious question and am interested in your honest opinion, because I'm always hearing bad things about tabs? How come?
Hooper drives the boat chief...
#32
There's standard music notation for guitar, developed in 18th century (?) that is being discarded for positional notation that works only for guitar.
What I am saying is that if you as a guitarist learned standard notation as in classical music, you can pick any other instrument's part and play that reading their notes and vice-versa. Tab is like the half blind kiddie version with crutches of the same thing and it doesn't translate to other instruments.

I didn't mind having tab as secondary notation along with standard notation, as tab help with positional work (say playing E off of 9th fret 3rd string, instead of that same E as open E on first string) but most guitar mags dropped standard notation from their lessons. Standard notation also had a positional approach for guitar that is incorporated but is not as deep as tab could be.
#33
diabolical Good answer! I grew up learning piano so I know what you mean by standard notation and being able to utilize it for any instrument. To be honest though, when I first picked up a guitar I loved that tabs were available. For people who don't know much about music theory and standard notation it's a perfect means of being able to play a favorite song - it's not so overwhelming at first. I have somewhat switched back to sheets of music rather than looking at numbers on 6 lines. 
But you're right, it's something that should not be completely discarded.
Hooper drives the boat chief...
#34
i'll start off by saying that i do use tabs in a pinch, or to get an idea of key/main chords before i start tackling something. that's more out of laziness than anything

my main problem with tab is that it creates a bad habit in new guitarists. they tend to pervert the definition of learning a song - it's more like whack-a-mole, hitting the notes when they pop up on a sheet rather than really, really having to internalize the machinations of a song

then when they get bored of that, they say "well i can't write music but know all the riffs i wanna know, time to learn theory"->"this is hard, what's a good scale to play?"->"oh, look, modes! wow, i know all these shapes now that i can run up and down"

this is all from personal experience and from observing countless people lost in the rabbithole on these forums over the years. it feeds into instant gratification in a big way, because it simultaneously makes the process of learning music simpler and much, much more complicated

standard notation is very useful, but i feel like guitarists (and musicians in general) should hone their ear more than anything. tabs and sheet music are great as a shorthand, especially if you make your own, but for learning music, they tend to be detrimental. it robs the player of the opportunity to make the connections between their ear and fretboard for themselves, which is what really unlocks your ability as a musician. if you can hear what you're going to play before you play it - or hear something, then translate it to the fretboard - all the theoretical knowledge and technical ability is secondary. those will both come naturally from using your ear and encountering problems you want to solve, but your ear benefits only marginally (if at all) from tabs

sheet music has an added benefit if you can read a score and sightsing, though. you can develop an ear with sheet music, but it's not as conventional (or immediate) a gain as simply plugging something into Transcribe! and working your way through it
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
Last edited by Hail at Jul 14, 2017,
#35
Hail A very detailed and informative response Hail! Thanks for that. It's actually even given me a different perspective on learning songs. I've always been reliant on standard notation or tabs - I will start learning by ear now. Thanks for the insight! We've kind of gone off-topic from the main thread here, but at least I can say I benefited from some cool insight! Cheers lads!
Hooper drives the boat chief...
#36
I don't think tabs are that bad. They are actually the most effective way of communicating ideas for guitarists. Of course tabs shouldn't be used for everything, and for a lot of things sheet music is superior. But sometimes knowing the exact fingerings is beneficial, for example if the song is chord based and the exact chord voicings are really important. That's where I think tab works better than sheet music. Then again, understanding stuff like voice leading is a lot easier with sheet music.

Also, most guitarists will only play with other guitarists and bassists. Most of them don't need to communicate with keyboardists, horn players, etc. And in that case using tabs is the most effective way of communicating musical ideas.

But yeah, learning only from tabs is pretty limiting and people shouldn't be dependent on tabs. But I think beginners need an accessible way of learning a lot of songs and tabs work well for that. For beginners, is it really more important to learn everything by ear (and learn fewer songs more slowly) than to learn a lot of songs to get a decent technique first? I mean, I think learning a lot of songs in the beginning is what you should do. Only when you can play some music, does ear training and theory knowledge and all that really start making sense.

I think it's best to do both - to learn from tabs to learn a lot of songs efficiently and to pick a couple of songs as an ear training exercise. If you really want to be efficient about your ear training, you start from really simple stuff. Most of the time people's playing skills are better than their aural skills, and if they want to improve their technique, it makes no sense to just learn simple songs. And the advanced songs that would develop your technique are way beyond your hearing capabilities, so it would make no sense to try to learn those by ear (it would take forever). For example if you want to learn a song that uses a lot of extended chords, it makes sense to first get those chord voicings under your fingers before you start trying to pick them up by ear. If you are already familiar with the chord voicings, it's easier to pick them up by ear. But if you aren't, it may take forever to try to learn them by ear. Knowing how to play something technically makes it a lot easier to pick it up by ear.

I mean, try to make somebody who has never played a major or a minor chord figure out the chord progression of a song. It's just not going to happen because they have never played a chord progression. But tell them to learn some basic cowboy chords first and then to figure out the chords to a song, and most likely they can do it a lot easier.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 14, 2017,
#37
There's loads of good stuff in here - thanks to those of you who really got the concept and helped out, I may be using your forum names when I finish this vid and throw it on to YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/RonnieDisaronno
To those of you who posted the kinda crap that reminded me why I never use this forum... I dunno... What's the opposite of "thanks"?
#38
Quote by Hail
i'll start off by saying that i do use tabs in a pinch, or to get an idea of key/main chords before i start tackling something. that's more out of laziness than anything

my main problem with tab is that it creates a bad habit in new guitarists. they tend to pervert the definition of learning a song - it's more like whack-a-mole, hitting the notes when they pop up on a sheet rather than really, really having to internalize the machinations of a song

then when they get bored of that, they say "well i can't write music but know all the riffs i wanna know, time to learn theory"->"this is hard, what's a good scale to play?"->"oh, look, modes! wow, i know all these shapes now that i can run up and down"

this is all from personal experience and from observing countless people lost in the rabbithole on these forums over the years. it feeds into instant gratification in a big way, because it simultaneously makes the process of learning music simpler and much, much more complicated

standard notation is very useful, but i feel like guitarists (and musicians in general) should hone their ear more than anything. tabs and sheet music are great as a shorthand, especially if you make your own, but for learning music, they tend to be detrimental. it robs the player of the opportunity to make the connections between their ear and fretboard for themselves, which is what really unlocks your ability as a musician. if you can hear what you're going to play before you play it - or hear something, then translate it to the fretboard - all the theoretical knowledge and technical ability is secondary. those will both come naturally from using your ear and encountering problems you want to solve, but your ear benefits only marginally (if at all) from tabs

sheet music has an added benefit if you can read a score and sightsing, though. you can develop an ear with sheet music, but it's not as conventional (or immediate) a gain as simply plugging something into Transcribe! and working your way through it


Tabs..are like going to the library..but your only able to read books with pictures,,,
play well

wolf
#39
There are certain situations where standard notation is just not a practical way of notation things without having to add additional directions on finger placement. A lot of country guitar playing for example uses open strings combined with up-the-neck notes as we call them and so you end up playing these runs without consecutive notes on the same string other than an occasional slide or hammer-on from/pull-off to open strings. The finger for such things is very counterintuitive to most guitar players and is not really obvious. It becomes extremely confusing with standard notation since most guitarists, when seeing scales in standard notation, likely take on their standard three notes per string alternate picking shapes. Something like this for example:



It's a straight two octave scale, but if you saw that written in standard notation without any indication of fingerings, you would probably go at it alternate picked, three notes per string, like I said before rather than thinking of doing it as written there. And without allowing strings to ring and notes to bleed together slightly since alternate picking kills the previous notes on that string, it just won't sound right.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#40
OK, this isn't exactly a question...but it is s a true story when I went for my first (of only a few) guitar lessons...I had no clue about guitar. The teacher kept telling me to play the open high e string, then put my  first finger on the first fret, and then my third finger on the third fret. I knew so little about the guitar that I was plucking the strings at the frets with my first and third finger, not pressing down on them....so of course I was just playing an open e in all three positions....duh. Teach got a laugh out of that one.
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