#1
Hello. I was thinking about buying this mixer to try to play 2 guitars at the same time through a single amplifier. My friend has a weaker amplifier than mine and I want us to be on equal ground.

]https://www.thomann.de/ro/behringer_micromix_mx400.htm

Do you guys think it will sound good? Or should I keep the current set-up we have?
#2
Running two guitars into the same guitar amp is not a very good idea in my experience. Typically the signal will just be bad. The signals fight each other and they would very easily overdrive the amp input. Maybe get your friend a small amp-in-a-box pedal (like the Joyo units) and have him go through a powered wedge or the PA?
Last edited by Will Lane at Jul 16, 2017,
#3
They make signal boxes that do A/B/Y stuff. Using a mixer is a bad idea. Like Will said, two guitars playing through one amp at the same time isn't good though, especially if they are both hitting it before the preamp. If your friend's amp is quieter, turn yours down. There is now reason why you need your amps loud anyway unless you are playing with a drummer.
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#5
Quote by Will Lane
ftfy
Quote by Will Lane
ftfy


What do you expect the drummer to play? A set of cardboard boxes? Like if you're just sitting in a room and playing with someone else, there is not much reason to make the guitars louder than speaking volume. Drums are louder than speaking.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Jul 16, 2017,
#6
Quote by theogonia777
What do you expect the drummer to play?  A set of cardboard boxes?  Like if you're just sitting in a room and playing with someone else, there is not much reason to make the guitars louder than speaking volume.

Does yours not?
#7
Quote by Will Lane
Does yours not?


The last time I played in a band with a drummer, he played clown drums. I think they were an Alesis Phil Collins signature kit.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#8
I don't know. I used to run two separate pickups into a mixer, and a PA mixing desk runs many inputs into an amp system. I'd like to know how this is any different. If it does work, it might need a phase switch on one of the inputs.

I had something similar to that Behringer, but I never used it in the way that you would, so I can't help with specifics.
#9
Quote by Tony Done
I don't know. I used to run two separate pickups into a mixer, and a PA mixing desk runs many inputs into an amp system. I'd like to know how this is any different. If it does work, it might need a phase switch on one of the inputs.

I had something similar to that Behringer, but I never used it in the way that you would, so I can't help with specifics.

A guitar amp has quite different signal shaping capabilites and signal integrity compared to proper PA equipment.
#11
Quote by Tony Done
Will Lane

OK, but I'd like to see something a bit more specific than that. Come to that, I might dig out my mini mixer and try it if it is still working.

Maybe the biggest difference in their capabilities is the headroom/wattage handling. Guitar amps are often made to break up, especially/primarily at the preamp section, but PA stuff is meant to stay clean. Slamming it with two signals can mean the preamp will be stressed. One guitarist strumming away will overdrive the preamp, even if the other is playing soft- the soft part will be driven as well. Also if both guitarists hit the same low note just right, the signal will be boosted quite a sum and you will just end up with nasty mush. If both guitarists hit the same low note just a tiny bit differently, the signals could cancel each other out.

Further, your typical guitar amp only outputs 20-100w, which the bass frequencies of a single guitar will eat up most of that headroom- proper PA equipment should be able to handle 200w+ and therefore be able to handle the bass frequencies and acoustical complexities of multiple inputs.

EDIT: Ultimately you could try it. You will surely get both the guitar signals to the amp. But the question was "Do you guys think it will sound good?", my answer is no.
Last edited by Will Lane at Jul 16, 2017,
#13
Quote by theogonia777
The last time I played in a band with a drummer, he played clown drums. I think they were an Alesis Phil Collins signature kit.


"Clown drums?" We've had a few electronic kit drummers (and one who played electronic-only drums for practice and an acoustic set with mesh drum triggers live). The better electronic drum kits are pretty good (though all drummers bitch about cymbals). We were using preamps/modelers/electronic keys through a mixer into headphones and IEMs. Pretty funny for someone visiting to hear people yelling into a microphones and a whole bunch of "tippity-tap" and "pring" sounds at very low volume along with it.

You can have both guitars into a single amp, no problem. We've done that before with both people just plugging into multiple inputs in a single head. On old Fenders both instruments would take on the characteristics of the Brite channel. A mixer would be useful, of course, though I'd suggest a DI box or a preamp/modeler of some kind between guitar and mixer.
#14
Back in the day a friend and I used a simple 1/4 inch mono splitter (double female to single male) to play through the same amp.  It didn't seem to sound any worse than playing one guitar.   
#15
It will work if the amp is really clean and you each get your distortion and fx from you own pedal chain or multifx.  No different than using a looper.
#16
When I ran my synth rig, I had a bunch of keyboards (with pedals) plugged into a mixer, and then I ran a crossover and sent the lows to an Ampeg bass amp with a Carvin 1x18, and the mids/highs went into a 30W Orange driving an Orange 2x12 and Mesa 4x12.  I usually played two keyboards at a time manually, and typically another one was dong some noise generation.  Was never an issue, and the keyboards did not compete for preamp space.

To the point though, one day we decided to see what would happen if we plugged a guitar and bass into it.  Maybe it was the crossover (though that doesn't negate that two separate signals were still routed to each amp) but it sounded a-ok.  If anything, it just caused the preamp to break-up quicker, but that was a non issue for our application.  
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