#1
Hi guys, am after some advice with getting a bigger/better sound from a guitar amp when playing live! We are a 3 peice band with one guitarist, synth and a drummer! We dont have a bassist. We want some advice with a getting a much bigger sound from the guitat to help fill out the sound so it doesnt sound as empty and tinny as we feel we just drown the guitar out when we play live and we struggle to hear when we are live as it doesnt cut through well. Were using an epiphone les paul so i know its not the greatest guitar in the world be we really need some help with this. We play indie/pop/rock with a hint of blues and rnb if that helps

Thanks in advance!!
#2
Get a bass player.

Amp isn't cutting through in the mix? Crank up the mids.. Let the new bass player fill in the sonic space the guitar left behind.

Then you will sound big.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
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#3
T00DEEPBLUE getting a bassist isnt an option atm were advertising but having no luck so its until we get one... so you say crank up the mids? Were newmto the whole amp and electric sound so what kinda settings do i crank up? Sorry if it sounds dumb but weve been an a acoustic driven band before now
#4
Does you amp not have a midrange control? What amp is it?
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#5
Quote by heaven086
Hi guys, am after some advice with getting a bigger/better sound from a guitar amp when playing live! We are a 3 peice band with one guitarist, synth and a drummer! We dont have a bassist. We want some advice with a getting a much bigger sound from the guitat to help fill out the sound so it doesnt sound as empty and tinny as we feel we just drown the guitar out when we play live and we struggle to hear when we are live as it doesnt cut through well. Were using an epiphone les paul so i know its not the greatest guitar in the world be we really need some help with this. We play indie/pop/rock with a hint of blues and rnb if that helps

Thanks in advance!!


Your Epiphone Les Paul is just fine and likely has nothing at all to do with the bigger/better sound thing.

You might have your keyboardist play bass. That would give you, in essence, a four-piece band (while having only three). There are a number of options for this: one, have him split his keyboard (most keyboards will do this) and play bass with his left hand. Two, get a bass keyboard that he can play separately. Three, get him a set of bass pedals that he can play with his left foot. I've done all three (not at once...) while playing keys. Four, just have him play bass guitar. This last one works if you've got really talented people on all three instruments, however. Not so much if you're all beginners. In all for instances, the keyboardist is going to have to be playing through some kind of amplification system that has the ability to reproduce the bottom end.

You didn't mention the guitarist's amp; if it's a home practice amp, it's not going to do much for you. You also didn't mention what you're playing through in terms of a PA system.

Turning up mids on the guitar amp isn't going to do much for you if you have everyone (vocals, keys, drums) occupying that space already. "Bigger/better sound" is also going to require an upgrade on your sound gear.
#6
Other options for more low-end tones:

1) add an octave- down pedal. Depending on the model, they typically go 1-2 octaves down. The Morpheus Dive Bomber can go lower, but it's a wah-style thing, so not good for always-on use.

2) play in an alternative tuning

3) get a baritone guitar

4) get a 7, 8, or bigger guitar

5) get a hybrid 7 or 8 string guitar/bass (like Charlie Hunter)
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#7
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Other options for more low-end tones:

1) add an octave- down pedal.  Depending on the model, they typically go 1-2 octaves down.  The Morpheus Dive Bomber can go lower, but it's a wah-style thing, so not good for always-on use.

2)  play in an alternative tuning

3) get a baritone guitar

4) get a 7, 8, or bigger guitar

5) get a hybrid 7 or 8 string guitar/bass (like Charlie Hunter)

I like options 3-6.  Everyone needs more guitars!
#8
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#9
drop tune. turn the bass up. get a 7 string guitar and drop it LOW.  still sound thin because you don't have a bassist. 
It's all about feel
#10
I know you don't play metal, but this could help you.

"It means a lot to me that my darkness can connect with your darkness and make it OK." - James Hetfield

Guitar: Ibanez S370
Seymour Duncan Pick ups
SH-4 JB (Neck)
Quarter Pound (Strat)
SH-6 Distortion (Bridge)

Amp:
Peavey 6505 Mini Head
w/Peavey 112 Speaker cab (Celestion Greenback)

Pedals:
Boss NS-2
Boss DS-1
Fulltone OCD Overdrive
Last edited by Phantumgrey at Aug 8, 2017,
#11
On early Weezer albums Rivers Cuomo used to barre the two lowest strings behind any power chord and sometimes only those two to get that bassy rumble.

Of course, they had some crazy recipes for bass guitar but his guitar did have a lot of bottom end.
#12
No matter how creatively you play you can't make a Les Paul sound like a bass without seriously changing how you play. An octave pedal will create an octave on every note of every chord. That won't work. If you are playing indie/pop/rock you don't want to droptune or use an octave pedal. That just won't fit that style of music. I agree with dspellman you either need a bass player or let the keyboard play bass also. He has two hands and most any keyboard made has the ability to do spit sounds so put the bass on the bottom of the keyboard. I worked for many years with a regular bass player who also played keyboards outside of our band. When we lost our regular keyboard player the bass player said he would move to keys and he split his keyboard and continued to play left hand bass on the bottom. It worked great, sounded really fat and gave us one less band member to spit the gig money with. We went from being a four piece to a three piece and it was one of the most kick ass bands I ever worked with. We were able to play gigs where a four five piece band wouldn't fit in the club and we worked a lot. 
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Aug 9, 2017,