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#1
A few days ago in another guitar forum I saw a Thread discussing about the death of the electric guitar and how in the last years the guitar sellings are going down,  I couldn´t find out more details because is a spanish forum and the discussion was about the guitar sellings in Spain, and after that I was thinking, I would like to know that,  specially from those who lives in USA, do you think the guitars aren´t being as popular as before?? and are the sellings going down too?? I say USA because is the biggest guitar brand country, and where most the actual rock bands play in, but I would like to know what´s going on in other countries like Canada, Australia, rest of Europe....  someone who works, or have contacts with guitar stores would help too much.
#2
Guitar popularity is down, that's true. Hiphop, EDM have taken the crown as most popular music genres.

I don't think guitar is dying. They base this mainly on Gibson and Fender's numbers. Mainly Gibson is doing badly. But with their poor quality control, high prices and non-ergonomic guitars that doesn't surprise me.
Fender on the other hand surprised me, as every band and their grandmother here seems to play fenders, be it bass or guitar

Most people i know also gravitate towards second hand guitars. High end guitar players gravitate towards vintage items,  especially for Gibson/Fender. 
Last edited by AEnesidem at Sep 1, 2017,
#3
No. In particular sectors, its actually doing pretty decently well under the circumstances.

The only reason why people are discussing this now and not years ago is because of that Washington Post article that got a ton of traction online because it's the Washington Post. Not necessarily because what it says is actually accurate or that it offers a good perspective. Electric guitar certainly isn't 'dying' like that article says it is.

The absolute popularity of the electric guitar peaked in around 2006 (based on new guitar sales alone) due to the Guitar Hero fad reaching it's peak. But new product sales alone represent a very narrow view of what constitutes the absolute popularity of something. There are conflicting sources from Fender which state that new sales of their guitars are actually pretty stable (especially when it comes to acoustic guitars). And that they're employing lots of new strategies to not only attract first time buyers, but to keep them from quitting in the first 12 months (which in my opinion is the much bigger issue) with lesson programs and such.

What I care way more about than the absolute quantity of players at any one time, is the number of people who will continue to keep playing and therefore keep investing their disposable income into gear. Those people not only invest orders of magnitude more money into the industry than the kid who only invests $100 into a Squier starter pack, but the distribution of that investment spreads to other sectors of the guitar, amp and pedal market that beginner players never touch, such as the boutique market. This makes the industry much more diverse, which helps to stop the $100 Squier Bullet starter packs from totally monopolizing brick and mortar store shelves. Quality of gear sales > quantity.

Guitar-oriented music is not popular in the charts like it used to be, but I don't see how that warrants ringing alarm bells. Guitar-oriented music was never originally intended to appeal to a mass market. You don't need to look very hard in the areas of the music industry where it really counts to see that it's doing fine.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Sep 1, 2017,
#4
new sales and pop music really aren't the best gauges. sure in pop music guitar has been playing a lesser role but there is way more to music then that. plenty of new metal bands and country is going strong. both are guitar oriented. over production of guitars may be dragging the numbers down and with the economy as it is the used market likely gets more sales (i personally have only bought 1 new guitar in the last 10 years but have bought 3 more used ).
#5
T00DEEPBLUE

Nailed it. The Post article read like so many other articles I see in big-name media outlets: boomer-centric and lacking any real perspective.

Big chain sales are down? Well that's likely because the service at most stores is lousy and guitar isn't an industry that suffers the idiots at Guitar Denter well.

Gibson and Fender are down? Well the boomers who fap the hardest to those brands are old and dying.

I'd say there is a real boom in guitar tech and innovation. It is hard to justify that unless SOMEONE is buying it.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#6
yeah what T00DEEPBLUE said. Even in a lot of pop music there's still a lot of guitar (taylor swift?), Wasn't there a good vid where the tone king (yeah i never thought I'd use those words in the same sentence either ) interviewed the fender CEO and he basically said they were doing fine? granted, he's going to say that, but still.
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#7
Learning a musical instrument has a lot of competition with respect to ways that people choose to pass the time and I think that overall that going to affect the sales of all musical instruments in a negative way in the long term, but from my perspective, it seems like there's still an overwhelming majority of people who want to learn to play a musical instrument who pick the guitar as the instrument they want to play.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#8
the bubble definitely burst.
gibson isn't doing very well.
but guitar is doing very well. just not as mainstream as it used to be.

i mean gibson can die. who cares.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#9
Quote by dementiacaptain
T00DEEPBLUE

Nailed it. The Post article read like so many other articles I see in big-name media outlets: boomer-centric and lacking any real perspective.

Big chain sales are down? Well that's likely because the service at most stores is lousy and guitar isn't an industry that suffers the idiots at Guitar Denter well.

Gibson and Fender are down? Well the boomers who fap the hardest to those brands are old and dying.

I'd say there is a real boom in guitar tech and innovation. It is hard to justify that unless SOMEONE is buying it.


Spend some time at a NAMM show and you'll find that guitar sales have been stagnant for quite a while. This can be tied to boomers moving into retirement (12,000/day over the next 10 years), or to the move away from guitar bands in popular music (most is synth based and computer generated), or to the influx of decent quality Asian-sourced instruments at bargain prices. Or it can be tied to the dilution of the music industry (everyone has his own play list) or the emphasis on Disney princesses as music goddesses or on boredom with random hip-hop thuggery. In any case guitar is less a part of the mix.
#10
Others in this thread totally nailed the market aspect of this, but one thing I will add, is that metal in particular is as popular as it's ever been right now, especially with the whole djent craze and (to my admitted chagrin) metalcore is super popular amongst young teens right now. There are absolutely tons of new bands popping up all over the place, and at least in metal, labels are signing more acts right now than they have in decades, now that people are figuring out how to monetize their music a bit better in a post-Napster world. 

Oh, and every single one of those bands has at least one guitarist (with some strange exceptions), and sometimes three! There are also some extremely guitar focused instrument acts like Animals as Leaders. That band is 2/3rds guitar, play all instrumental, and have become huge over the past few years.

The guitar isn't going anywhere, and I couldn't be happier about that fact.
Last edited by ExDementia at Sep 1, 2017,
#11

i mean gibson can die. who cares.


Careful with that sort of talk!

RaycoLeal, there are hundreds of guitar makers out there who are actually ramping up production these days.

Technology is making higher-quality, ambitious designs more affordable. That means better, innovative guitars in the hands of consumers at lower prices.

Direct sales to consumers is a growing trend.

And while others are right about the current popularity of non-guitar centric genres, C&W is still big, and tastes change. Not only that, there are guitarists hiding even within non-guitar genres. More (but not many) rap bands are featuring "real" instruments as opposed to just turntables and samples. Some electronic artists continue to use guitars as part of their sound, either in their backing bands or even in their own hands.

So basically...I'm thinking the guitar market is not so much dying as...metamorphosizing.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

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#12
also there are more quality options at all price points then there were when I joined this forum.
also fan fret all the things please.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#13
Not dying but dead.  As soon as the tree trunk was cut. . . . 

Someone should make a guitar in their yard by putting strings, pickups, etc on a live tree branch.  Intonation would be a bitch as the tree grows, and the rain, and. . . no wonder live guitars didn't make it.  

Oh, you're talking figuratively aren't you. 
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#14
I think the whole reason this article gained any bloody traction is because it's kind of "alarmist". It basically steers you into thinking Guitarmageddon is upon us and we all need to fear our "right to rock" will be revoked in a split second because all those "damn kids" with their silly EDM and Smartphones and their steam games.

What it really is - and this has been a subject on some more vintage oriented guitar forums I visist - is that the people who grew up in the age the old legends came up in are getting old, and starting to adopt that mindset they actually hated in their own grandparents that they rebelled against did. George Gruhn, Paul Reed Smith, Eric Clapton - I know this sounds disrespectful, they are OLD. They remember when amps had one channel and you needed a Humbucker to get a good high gain sound. I'll admit I have some shades of that myself even. But it can be seen as a burn or an opportunity.

An interesting thing we were talking about in a thread on OSG is what is going ot happen to all of these "vintage guitars". A lot of what you see for sale on Reverb and elsewhere in the vintage market are older people cutting down on their collections as they are getting older and need to reduce the collection in case they die so their non-musical family members won't need to struggle to sell 98 "old dirty beat up guitars" and might actually get inheretance money rather than having to shill a row of old Fenders and Gibsons.

Truth is there are going ot be more guitars out there than owners for them. I already see this happening with lower end guitars, so I can imagine vintage prices may come down in the future and the vintage bubble will burst.
My Current Mains
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#15
Someone should make a guitar in their yard by putting strings, pickups, etc on a live tree branch. Intonation would be a birch as the tree grows, and the rain, and. . . no wonder live guitars didn't make it.


Fixed that for ya.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#17
I don't understand people saying that guitar doesn't have as much of a place in mainstream music when guys like Ed Sheeran and Shawn Mendes are up there on the charts and indie bands like Mumford and Sons and Of Monsters and Men are bigger than they've ever been. Guitar is still the main instrument of country music and that includes that modern contemporary radio stuff even if it is trash. Mainstream radio country was always trash. But Brent Mason is still there killing it on almost every album and Johnny Hiland is on the rest.

EDM, while mainstream, is also not charting in the Hot 100 the way Blake Shelton and Ed Sheeran are so you could argue that guitar music is still more mainstream than EDM.

Guitar is still popular in mainstream music and really if people are complaining it's because they aren't hearing harder rock guitar featured as a lead instrumrnt in the mainstream. A lot of overly sentimental people that long for the days of when their favorite rock bands consistently topped the charts.

Newsflash: they didn't. Led Zeppelin had 6 singles that peaked in the top 40 of the Hot 100 chart (which is the biggest determinant of what is mainstream in the US) with Whole Lotta Love peaking at 4 and Immigrant Song and Black Dog peaking at 16 respectively. That's only one measure of success, but it does quantify the fact that Lep Zeppelin was never the biggest artist and they were not really even mainstream.

Guns N Roses had 9 top 40 songs on the Hot 100 including 6 in the top 10 and Sweet Child of Mine went to No 1. So a little bit more mainstream success. But still not really much to speak of when major pop artists like Michael Jackson or Taylor Swift or whatever got and get multiple No 1s on the same album.

So yeah. Guitar isn't dying from mainstream music. Light use of guitar has always been part of mainstream music and hard rock guitar was never really significant in the mainstream other than like Creed.

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Fixed that for ya.


boo
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#18
Quote by Mad-Mike_J83
I think the whole reason this article gained any bloody traction is because it's kind of "alarmist".  It basically steers you into thinking Guitarmageddon is upon us and we all need to fear our "right to rock" will be revoked in a split second because all those "damn kids" with their silly EDM and Smartphones and their steam games.

What it really is - and this has been a subject on some more vintage oriented guitar forums I visist - is that the people who grew up in the age the old legends came up in are getting old, and starting to adopt that mindset they actually hated in their own grandparents that they rebelled against did.  George Gruhn, Paul Reed Smith, Eric Clapton - I know this sounds disrespectful, they are OLD.  They remember when amps had one channel and you needed a Humbucker to get a good high gain sound.  I'll admit I have some shades of that myself even.  But it can be seen as a burn or an opportunity.

An interesting thing we were talking about in a thread on OSG is what is going ot happen to all of these "vintage guitars".  A lot of what you see for sale on Reverb and elsewhere in the vintage market are older people cutting down on their collections as they are getting older and need to reduce the collection in case they die so their non-musical family members won't need to struggle to sell 98 "old dirty beat up guitars" and might actually get inheretance money rather than having to shill a row of old Fenders and Gibsons.  

Truth is there are going ot be more guitars out there than owners for them.  I already see this happening with lower end guitars, so I can imagine vintage prices may come down in the future and the vintage bubble will burst.

vintage bubble has already burst that happened a few years ago. really cherry examples will continue to hold value but more as collectables than a guitar you would actually use. the market for guitars in lesser condition will drop out in th next few years for a major correction in market value. Clapton is old but i think will continue to be held in a certain amount of esteem as long as their are electric guitar fans much like Hendrix. the 2nd tier guys and lower from the 60s and 70s will fade away to a certain degree as the years go by (some already have). as for "all" those vintage guitars they will still be around just at more affordable prices. the desire to have something that was made like they used to never seems to go away ( antiques are just as popular as ever) asal you need is guys like Jack White to come along and suddenly guitars that you couldn't give a way will be sought after. 
#20
Quote by Tony Done
I wonder how the electric guitar is faring in the non-western world? Where western culture is adopted, it often seems to lag behind the west, so maybe electric guitars are still on a wave. Or maybe they've been bypassed in favour of more modern forms of noise-making.


I see a lot of acts fusing the western electric guitar with traditional styles: Bombino and Tinariwen are among the Tuareg frontrunnrs.



And- not so surprisingly once you think about it- there are African guitarists who are doing likewise, sometimes pointing out to confused western music journalists that no, they're not copying American blues and blues rock, but rather evolving along a parallel line (because one of the main ancestors to blues and blues rock were African musical forms). Here's some Mokoomba and Ali Farka Touré for you:

Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#21
Quote by theogonia777
I don't understand people saying that guitar doesn't have as much of a place in mainstream music when guys like Ed Sheeran and Shawn Mendes are up there on the charts and indie bands like Mumford and Sons and Of Monsters and Men are bigger than they've ever been.  Guitar is still the main instrument of country music and that includes that modern contemporary radio stuff even if it is trash.  Mainstream radio country was always trash.  But Brent Mason is still there killing it on almost every album and Johnny Hiland is on the rest.

EDM, while mainstream, is also not charting in the Hot 100 the way Blake Shelton and Ed Sheeran are so you could argue that guitar music is still more mainstream than EDM.

Guitar is still popular in mainstream music and really if people are complaining it's because they aren't hearing harder rock guitar featured as a lead instrumrnt in the mainstream.  A lot of overly sentimental people that long for the days of when their favorite rock bands consistently topped the charts.  

Newsflash:  they didn't.  Led Zeppelin had 6 singles that peaked in the top 40 of the Hot 100 chart  (which is the biggest determinant of what is mainstream in the US) with Whole Lotta Love peaking at 4 and Immigrant Song and Black Dog peaking at 16 respectively.  That's only one measure of success, but it does quantify the fact that Lep Zeppelin was never the biggest artist and they were not really even mainstream.

Guns N Roses had 9 top 40 songs on the Hot 100 including 6 in the top 10 and Sweet Child of Mine went to No 1.  So a little bit more mainstream success.  But still not really much to speak of when major pop artists like Michael Jackson or Taylor Swift or whatever got and get multiple No 1s on the same album.

So yeah.  Guitar isn't dying from mainstream music.  Light use of guitar has always been part of mainstream music and hard rock guitar was never really significant in the mainstream other than like Creed.  


boo

some good points that missed the whole picture. as far as singles success yes Led Zeppelin didn't have much and Hendrix only had 1 song hit the top 40 ( All Along The Watchtower peaked at #20) in the US (but did have pop success in england) . what they did have was huge album sales which changed what was viewed as "success" in music. for a pretty fair stretch album sales were more important than singles. it has shifted back in recent years and albums are more of an after thought just like in the 50s and pre Beatles 60s. 
#22
dannyalcatraz 

My wife is Colombian, and I get the impression from what she listens to that there has been a similar melding of traditional and electric in Latin America. Coincidentally, I was listening to Tinariwen just yesterday. I do a fair bit of Youtube surfing for world music, and their look grabbed my attention.
Last edited by Tony Done at Sep 1, 2017,
#23
Quote by monwobobbo
some good points that missed the whole picture. as far as singles success yes Led Zeppelin didn't have much and Hendrix only had 1 song hit the top 40 ( All Along The Watchtower peaked at #20) in the US (but did have pop success in england) . what they did have was huge album sales which changed what was viewed as "success" in music. for a pretty fair stretch album sales were more important than singles. it has shifted back in recent years and albums are more of an after thought just like in the 50s and pre Beatles 60s. 


Album sales doesn't make you mainstream and neither does charting on the Top 200.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#24
While posting those I knew, I just stumbled on this:
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#25
Quote by theogonia777
Album sales doesn't make you mainstream and neither does charting on the Top 200.

nonsense. are you trying to tell me that having a #1 album in no way makes you mainstream.  how is that any different than having a #1 single? 
#26
Quote by monwobobbo
nonsense. are you trying to tell me that having a #1 album in no way makes you mainstream.  how is that any different than having a #1 single? 


Because singles get play and how much a song gets played depends on Hot 100 charting. For pop stations aka what is mainstream anyway. That means that charting singles are actually what people are hearing. Album sales also differ in that when a well known, but non-mainstream band puts out a new album, fans will quickly buy their album right when it comes out which creates a quick spike... only to plummet off the charts quickly. Avenged Sevenfold has had all 4 of their albums in the last 10 years reach the top 4 including two No 1 selling albums. Does that mean they are mainstream? No. It just means that they have enough interest to get sales. That's short term album sales and album charting.

Dark Side of the Moon stayed consecutively on the Billboard 200 chart for 15 years. That's remarkable. Back in Black has sold tens of millions of copies. Do those indicate mainstream popularity? Not really. In terms of longterm sales versus mainstream popularity, it's kind of a "Tortoise and Hare" thing where fast equates to mainstream popularity. The Hare is an album the is popular but six months later is largely ignored other than people remembering that one single. An album like Dark Side of the the Moon or Back in Black is like the tortoise in that its sales are attributable to longstanding popularity but not necessarily ever a huge mainstream burst. Granted, they peaked at No 1 and 4 respectively, but that doesn't necessarily mean anything as per the Avenged Sevenfold example.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#27
Quote by theogonia777
Because singles get play and how much a song gets played depends on Hot 100 charting.  For pop stations aka what is mainstream anyway.  That means that charting singles are actually what people are hearing.  Album sales also differ in that when a well known, but non-mainstream band puts out a new album, fans will quickly buy their album right when it comes out which creates a quick spike... only to plummet off the charts quickly.  Avenged Sevenfold has had all 4 of their albums in the last 10 years reach the top 4 including two No 1 selling albums.  Does that mean they are mainstream?  No.  It just means that they have enough interest to get sales.  That's short term album sales and album charting.

Dark Side of the Moon stayed consecutively on the Billboard 200 chart for 15 years.  That's remarkable.  Back in Black has sold tens of millions of copies.  Do those indicate mainstream popularity?  Not really.  In terms of longterm sales versus mainstream popularity,  it's kind of a "Tortoise and Hare" thing where fast equates to mainstream popularity.  The Hare is an album the is popular but six months later is largely ignored other than people remembering that one single.  An album like Dark Side of the the Moon or Back in Black is like the tortoise in that its sales are attributable to longstanding popularity but not necessarily ever a huge mainstream burst.  Granted, they peaked at No 1 and 4 respectively, but that doesn't necessarily mean anything as per the Avenged Sevenfold example.

you have contradicted your self. DSOTM did stay on the charts for 15 years if that isn't mainstream success then i don't know what is. somebody was buying that album and it wasn't the same people over and over. i think you need to really understand the meaning of mainstream. 

i'll use a non music item to make my point clearly. zombies. since george romero introduced the modern zombie they have inched toward the main stream. at first there were movies that were decidedly not mainstream and certainly weren't shown on tv back in the day. as time went by they started to pop up more and more and in places that you wouldn't expect. now you see them on tv commercials. people that would over wise not have anything to do with zombies know what they are and accept them on a certain level despite never having seen any of the movies they originated in. zombies are now mainstream despite that never being the intention.  by the same token you can find the album cover for DSOTM all over and it's rather iconic. again the definition of mainstream. 
#28
Quote by monwobobbo
i think you need to really understand the meaning of mainstream.


Mainstream music is the music that the average person is listening to at a given period. Being on the Top 200 chart for 15 years doesn't mean that the average person was listening to them. For example, I would imagine that the vast majority of buyers were male. Besides, being on the chart doesn't necessarily mean anything if you're hanging out at the bottom.
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#29
Quote by theogonia777
Mainstream music is the music that the average person is listening to at a given period.  Being on the Top 200 chart for 15 years doesn't mean that the average person was listening to them.  For example, I would imagine that the vast majority of buyers were male.  Besides, being on the chart doesn't necessarily mean anything if you're hanging out at the bottom.

do your homework DSOTM has sold over 45 million copies world wide and was hardly at the bottom of the charts for the first 2 years it was out.  it was all over radio and still is to this day. music from the album is found int tv commercials. a ton of people were listening back then and still are now. very few current  "mainstream" artist will ever see 1/10th of that much success. you picked a bad album to use as an example for your statement. oh and Back In Black won't work either again do your homework. 
#30
Quote by monwobobbo
do your homework DSOTM has sold over 45 million copies world wide and was hardly at the bottom of the charts for the first 2 years it was out.  it was all over radio and still is to this day. music from the album is found int tv commercials. a ton of people were listening back then and still are now. very few current  "mainstream" artist will ever see 1/10th of that much success. you picked a bad album to use as an example for your statement. oh and Back In Black won't work either again do your homework. 


All over what radio back then? Pop radio? Adult contemporary? Or rock radio? It makes a difference. These days, I highly doubt you hear it anywhere but classic rock stations. Classic rock radio is not mainstream. It's not the music that is popular at the moment. Just because a song is in commercials and movies doesn't really mean anything. There are plenty of classical pieces that are used ad nauseum. There are plenty of songs used by underground or relatively unknown or unsuccessful bands. Everyone knows "I'll Be There for You" since it was the opening theme to Friends. But what percentage do you think actually knows that the band was The Rembrandts? Would they be considered mainstream ever?

And long term success is irrelevant. Mainstream music is the top of the top. It's what you hear in every damn store you go into and plays on the radio 9 times a day and plays at every party. Doesn't mean that anything will come out of it. It's like being a quarterback. Mainstream success is being on top. Being the best for that one moment. Doesn't mean that you're good long term. Dan Marino, Fran Tarkenton, Dan Fouts, Philip Rivers, etc were great quarterbacks. But they never won it all. Poor guys. Doesn't mean that they didn't have great careers. The mainstream music is the quarterback that did win it all. Jeff Hostetler, Jim McMahon, Trent Dilfer, Brad Johnson, and Doug Williams won Super Bowls. Doesn't mean that they had great careers. That's most of the big pop starts. They're the lucky sons of guns that happened to play on the good team. And then you got like the Beatles and Michael Jackson and they're like Joe Montana or Tom Brady.

But anyway, I have to do other stuff so I can't really continue this discussion. It's also kind of getting off topic and Roc is gonna get mad and close the thread if we keep it up. And I think he's finally starting to like me. Roc8995 please confirm whether or not you are starting to like me. It was a fun discussions and you had some great points. 7/10 conversation. Would do it again in the future. Have good evening. Or whatever kind of evening you want in case you want to have any sort of evening other than good. If you want to have a bad evening, I won't judge.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#32
It doesn't have to die! I think the electric guitar fits perfectly with pop music today. Check this out...

Last edited by jparkerday95 at Sep 2, 2017,
#33
As someone who has been involved since the late 1980s, I can tell you that there are FAR MORE guitars around today than there were then!
Member has resigned from this forum and deleted his profile.
#34
Guitar is doing fine calm down people.
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#35
"Is the electric guitar dying???"

Mine certainly isn't; is yours OK?
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#36
Quote by dspellman
Spend some time at a NAMM show and you'll find that guitar sales have been stagnant for quite a while. This can be tied to boomers moving into retirement (12,000/day over the next 10 years), or to the move away from guitar bands in popular music (most is synth based and computer generated), or to the influx of decent quality Asian-sourced instruments at bargain prices. Or it can be tied to the dilution of the music industry (everyone has his own play list) or the emphasis on Disney princesses as music goddesses or on boredom with random hip-hop thuggery. In any case guitar is less a part of the mix.


is that true, though? i mean, i don't like his music, but they basically changed the rules about the charts here because ed sheeran's new album meant he had more or less taken over the entire top 20. acoustic at least seems to be more popular than ever.

lol theogonia777 pretty much beat me to it.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Sep 2, 2017,
#37
Honestly what difference does it make if guitar "dies out" anyway? I say this every time this topic comes up. The lute, mandolin, tenor banjo, etc all enjoyed brief periods as fad instruments and were more popular at their height than electric guitar has ever been. And they all dropped out of popularity eventually. What difference does it make if guitar falls into relative obscurity? It's not like people would have to stop playing. There would just be less new players and instruments coming in.

Guitarists look at this from a guitarcentric point and they look at it like guitar is the end-all, be-all of music. As evident my the entire history of music, guitar has never been needed for music. Some styles make varying use of guitar, some to the point that that type of music couldn't exist with guitar, but overall music existed before guitar plenty of music has continued to thrive without guitar. Anyway, if you step back and look at the larger picture, what happens happens and it doesn't really affect any of you unless you teach guitar. That's about it though.

And as someone who plays instruments that are not significant to her fulture, I can honestly say I don't care if the instruments I play are popular or not. I enjoy them and other people enjoy the novelty of hearing an instrument they have never seen in person before. If things go right, I'm probably going to pick up an oud, bağlama, and morin khuur in the near future and if I luck out with some business endeavors, probably a hurdy-gurdy. If I sit on the sidewalk somewhere and 100 people walk by, chances are not one of them was even aware that such instruments existed.

In fact, I think that a Ying guitar would be much cooler if the instrument falls into complete obscurity:

--50 years from now--

"What kind of instrument is that?"

"This is a guitar."

"Wow! I've heard about them but never seen one before!"
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#38
Quote by Dave_Mc
is that true, though? i mean, i don't like his music, but they basically changed the rules about the charts here because ed sheeran's new album meant he had more or less taken over the entire top 20. acoustic at least seems to be more popular than ever.

lol theogonia777 pretty much beat me to it.


Ed Sheeran's a singer who happens to play guitar. The same was true of Taylor Swift when she first arrived. Probably Shania Twain, too, for that matter. Those people have always been around, and country music has always had guitars around. Generally, however, country hasn't had the kind of album sales (or influence on musical instrument sales) that would affect the industry unless someone crossed over (Shania, Taylor) into pop culture as well. Brent Mason may be a killer studio player and an awesome live player, but I can guarantee you he's not making the money Lil Wayne is.

If you don't play a piano/keyboard, chances are good that your favorite compositional tool is a guitar. And look, no one said there weren't guitar sales going on or that there weren't artists out there driving some guitar sales. But the most powerful, driving forces in music don't center on guitar. And Ed Sheeran hasn't driven some renaissance in acoustic guitar sales anywhere.

Beyonce, Adele, Rihanna, Ariana Grande, Selena Gomez, Meghan Trainor, Sia, Alessia Cara, Taylor Swift, and Carrie Underwood were last year's Billboard top 10 chick singers, and none of them could be called guitar centric. Pull up the top 20 Billboard artists and tell me how many of those are known for their guitar playing. Bruno Mars? Kendrick Lamar, Shawn Mendez? DJ Khaled, Justin Bieber? Drake, The Weeknd? I think Imagine Dragons comes closest, but pull up a jillion photos of that band and most will not have a guitar in them. They're not a guitar band; they're a singer with a backup band that happens to have a guitar in it. None of that accelerates guitar interest or sales.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 2, 2017,
#39
Who cares. The billboard top charts and albums sales don't matter anymore. The mainstream stopped mattering a decade ago.
There are guitarists that do nothing but make a living from YouTube channel subscriptions. It's all good.

Gibson please die tho.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#40
Quote by dspellman
Generally, however, country hasn't had the kind of album sales (or influence on musical instrument sales) that would affect the industry unless someone crossed over (Shania, Taylor) into pop culture as well.


Not true. Pedal steel guitar sales are at about 27 instruments per year. Without Paul Franklin, that number would be about a third of what it is.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.