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#1
I'm curious to see what guitarists all of you actually like. Give me hour Top 10 or if you can't think if that many Top 5. They can be in a particular order or no particular order. If you want, you can additionally list your Top 5 or 10 favorites for other instruments you play.

I should give my answers. Might give brief summaris later. In no particular order:

Guitar (electric or acoustic)
--Brent Mason--the dude pretty much runs Nashville. Chops for days and the guy that has defined country playing the last 25 years. Does pretty much everything well and his session credit list is insane.
--Danny Gatton--Perhaps the all around greatest guitarist ever. Not much to say about him. If you've seen his live videos you understand and if you haven't their just aren't words.
--Terrence Hobbs--One of my to biggest riff writing influences.
--Paul Ryan--the other one. Also not the same guy as the politician.
--Shawn Lane--Arguably the most technically proficient guitarist of his day, but what I love is just how soft spoken and humble he was. He always had this attitude like, "Yeah, I'm great at guitar, but that doesn't matter that much to me. I want you to be great as well and I'll do whatever I can to help. Let's all great at guitar!"
--Johnny Hiland--Essentially Shawn's country Doppelgänger, including the chops, attitude, and girth.
--Jimmy Bryant--Just give this guy a listen. His blend of country and jazz is dizzying. Might have been legitimately been the fastest flat picker of the 50s. His recording of China Boy is insane. Need more? He was the first guy that Leo gave a Tele to because he figured he was the best guy to popularize it. That says a lot.
--Tony Rice--One of the all time great acoustic flat pickers. Not too much I have to say.
--Doc Watson--Probably better than any guitarist ever at interpreting old timey tunes.
--John Gallagher--Another metal guy that is a big influence on my riff writing.

Banjo (five string)
--Bill Keith--He's Bill Keith.
--Courtney Johnson--One of the first true newgrass players. I don't know.
--Don Reno--The guy had so many wonderful stylistic idiosyncrasies and quirks and unique non-banjoish aspects to his aging that honestly there is no one better to listen to if you want to really start learning what can be fond on banjo.
--Bill Emerson--I just love the Country Gentlemen.
--Earl Scruggs--Earl is the single most influence bluegrass player ever. Anyone that learns three finger style is standing on his shoulders and everyone puts all their effort into sounding exactly like him or trying to not sound like him. Not sure if there is a single musician that has been as influential on their instrument. 70 years later and while he has long since been far exceeded in terms of technical ability, his 40s and 50s recordings are still flawless in terms of how traditional bluegrass is played.
--Tony Trischka--He's real nice guy and a legendary instructor. He taught some friends of mine and he also taught Béla Fleck. For the record from playing with him he can't keep up to me in terms of speed.
--Pete Wernick--Another real nice guy and another legendary instructor. Great variety of chops and he's always got a minute or two for me to pick his brain over email. Also I have a lot of respect for him being an outspoken atheist in a genre that has a lot of conservative musicians and a lot more conservativefans.

Steel (pedal or non-pedal)
--Weldon Myrick
--Lloyd Green
--Hal Ruggles
--John Hughey
--Don Helms
--Josh Graves
--Brother Oswald
--Buddy Emmons
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#2
No particular order, with brief explanations:

Django Reinhardt - hopefully should be obvious. A monolith in the history of gypsy jazz music, crazy talented, has plenty of landmark recordings. And of course there's the two finger thing.

Chet Atkins - can't say I'm too familiar with his discography as a whole, but the songs I do know are great and his technique is just unique and amazing.

Guthrie Govan - I don't care about your personal opinion concerning Steven Wilsons music or Guthries solo stuff, if anyone claims that he's anything short of a master they can fight me. Technically one of the most impressive guitarists out there, plenty versatile, and has a touch few people can rival. His solos are such a joy to listen to thanks to his fluid style.

John Petrucci - again I don't care about your personal opinions on his music, he's a god. There isn't a guitarist who gets as much "he has no soul, only technique" complaints as Petrucci, and there are few who deserve them less. Also a great composer and he's responsible for plenty of amazing rhythm guitar stuff, not just solos.

Paco de Lucia - kind of a token entry, since I have a ton of appreciation for flamenco guitar (probably the hardest guitar-oriented genre out there imho). Lucia is of course the obvious, even cliche choice for the genre, but I just wanted to give a shoutout to flamenco guitar in general.

That's my top 5, kind of. Could be others, could change with my mood... but that's more or less it. I can give you a brief list for both electric and upright bass as well.

Upright:

1. Scott LaFaro - if you don't recognize the name, I don't blame you, but still shame on you. LaFaro is probably, as a performer, the best bassist in the history of jazz. Talented in both groovy rhythms and breathtaking improvisation, LaFaro was an unparalleled player during his time. Still gives me chills listening to this day.

2. Charles Mingus - obvious. Doesn't use the same caliber of improvisation and technique as LaFaro, but obviously beats him in terms of composing and bandleading skills. Probably one of my favorite jazz composers of all time.

3. Paul Chambers - again, pretty obvious. Technically a flawless player, with many landmark recordings under his belt. Also, responsible for some of the most memorable jazz basslines ever.

4. Ron Carter - not the most inspiring player for me as a performer, but I have to give him credits for all the work he has done.

5. Kris Funn - a contemporary bassist. I like his style, he is not a bad composer, and he's hell of a live performer. Recommended.

Electric:

1. Michael League - just a great composer and bandleader.

2. Thundercat - neither my favorite composer, or my favorite bassist in terms of rhythm, but his technical skills on the instrument are awe-inspiring. And his work does include some of my favorite modern soul/funk tracks.

3. Rocco Prestia - isn't Tower of Power one of the best funk bands of all time?

4. Stuart Zender -  bassist and co-writer on the best Jamiroquai albums? Obvious choice.

5. Tim Lefebvre - kind of cheating since I had to look his name up, but I love the bass work on "Blackstar" so much that I had to give a shoutout.

EDIT: my use of the word "you" was not aimed at Kristen, just generally at the reader. Thought I'd clear that up
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*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#3
I like Paul Chambers.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#4
Jeff Beck, Johnny A, Les Paul, Wally Bryson (electric 12 string), John Fogarty, Tommy Emmanuel.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#5
Not successful in my attempt at whittling down to 10, in no particular order:

Alex Lifeson
Charlie Hunter
Carlos Santana
Joe Satriani
Alex Skolnick
Buckethead
Nicky Skopelitis
David Gilmour
Steve Howe
Robert Fripp
Adrian Belew
Shawn Lane
Jimi Hendrix
Warren Cuckurullo
Tom Morello
Kim Thayil
Josh Homme
Tony Iommi
Jimmy Page
Billy Gibbons
Kaki King
Michael Hedges
YJM
SRV
Eric Johnson
Al Di Meola
Helios Creed
Brian May
Ry Cooder
Vernon Reid
Brian Setzer
Ty Tabor
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#7
My favorites are:

1. Steven Seagal
2. Jack Black
3. Ralph Macchio
4. The guy from Linkin Park with the afro and headphones
5. Khalil Mack
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Last edited by 80s_Dude at Sep 5, 2017,
#8
One I'd add as an up & comer would be Scott Holiday of Rival Sons. To my ears, he seems to have every classic rock tone & riff from 1959-1990 at his fingertips.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#9
Frank Vincent Zappa
Ryland Peter Cooder
Robert Allen Krieger
Lester William Polsfuss
A bloke I know called Pat

Patrick O'Hearn
Prakash John
Brian Keith Flowers
William James Dixon
Another bloke I know called Keith

Raymond Daniel Manzarek
John Len Chatman
Thomas Wright Waller
Reginald Kenneth Dwight (before all the slow ballads and crap)
Alan Price

Mandolin - Ry Cooder
Accordion - Guido Deiro
Banjo - Earl Scruggs (because so original)
Ukulele - Mic Conway, Roy Smeck
A poem.
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#10
So many excellent players.  I favor the lyrical players who really connect with listeners rather than the shred monsters.

Blues
BB King
Peter Green (early years before drugs fried his brain)
SRV
Clapton

Jazz crossover
Robben Ford
Jeff Beck
Carlos Santana

Rock
David Gilmour
Jimi Hendrix
Ritchie Blackmore
Gary Moore

Country
Vince Gill
James Burton
Albert Lee

Acoustic
Tommy Emmanuel
John Mayer
Paco de Lucia
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#11
Here's a bunch of mine : 

1) Hendrix
2) SRV
3) Wes Montgomery
4) Kurt Rosenwinkel
5) Tony Rice
6) John Scofield
7) Mark Knopfler
8) Satriani
9) Adrian Smith ( Maiden) 
10) Pettrucci 
11) David Gilmour
12) Lenny Breau
13) Julian Lage
14) Eric Gales
#12
--Shawn Lane--Arguably the most technically proficient guitarist of his day, but what I love is just how soft spoken and humble he was. He always had this attitude like, "Yeah, I'm great at guitar, but that doesn't matter that much to me. I want you to be great as well and I'll do whatever I can to help. Let's all great at guitar!"
--Johnny Hiland--Essentially Shawn's country Doppelgänger, including the chops, attitude, and girth.

So true.

If you ever watch an instructional video or a product demo from either guy, it is just...otherworldly how they inform with a smile and positivity that exudes through the screen, all while displaying chops formidables.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#13
Most of what I listen to is for the band as a whole rather than the guitarist, so can't stretch to a top 5, but I do have a very definite top 2:
- Billy Duffy
- Slash

Adding to the list, I'd probably go with Number 3 being:
- Angus Young

Then to round out a top 5, I'd need to include the general guitar parts from multiple guitar bands, so:
- Iron Maiden
- Lynyrd Skynyrd
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Last edited by GaryBillington at Sep 6, 2017,
#14
dannyalcatraz

Also I love how natural and authentic Johnny is in a cowboy hat and boots with that Tennessee accent despite being from Maine. He just doesn't feel like a poseur being all countrified. On the other hand it seems so fake on guys that are actually from the south.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#15
Quote by dannyalcatraz
So true.

If you ever watch an instructional video or a product demo from either guy, it is just...otherworldly how they inform with a smile and positivity that exudes through the screen, all while displaying chops formidables.

I only really discovered Shawn Lane like 2 weeks ago - insane. I've never seen technique like that - he is in a class of his own. Great musician and seemed like a really great guy. 
#16
I think, for the sake of discussion, people could give brief explanations to some of their favorite guitarists, since just having a list of ten names without context doesn't really incite meaningful conversation, just a thought

While this probably isn't what Kristen had in mind, I'd like to drop some names for the category "composer" and "songwriter" as well. Maybe this'll just turn into a "favorite musician" thread

Charles Mingus - already mentioned, but no point not mentioning him again. Few people could write such huge arrangements as he did while still paying so much attention to dynamics, keeping those longwinded jazz tracks exciting throughout. Like in Fables of Faubus, which has really cool ideas using drastic changes in rhythmic feel, or Black Saint and the Sinner Lady which breaks the flow of traditional jazz composition by using ideas more akin to classical dance music (it was supposed to be a ballet after all), as well as instruments like classical guitar thrown into the mix.

David Bowie - I don't know any rock/pop musicians whose music was as "cinematic" as Bowie's. His best tracks have this almost narrative feel where they feel like you're watching a movie or following a story. I think his work is remarkable to this day.

Gustav Mahler -  taking the risk of appearing poser-ish by including a classical composer, but when you've spent your life writing ten of the most breathtaking symphonies out there there's no way I'm not going to include you.

Nobuo Uematsu - I like video game music, and he's the best video game music composer basically ever. Responsible for such amazing tracks like Celes' and Setzer's theme from FFVI and "Clash at the Big Bridge" from FFV, as well as tons of other classics he's an obvious choice from the realm of soundtrack music.

Danny Elfman - Surprise surprise, a movie composer who is not Hans Zimmer! Not that Elfman would be any less famous. Probably my favorite movie composer. Howard Shore is a close second based on LOTR ost alone.

David DiSanto - Vektor isn't the best modern metal band for nothing. Terminal Redux is testament to his talent alone. Charging the Void, Pillars of Sand, Outer Isolation and Destroying the Cosmos are among his best work imo.

Kamasi Washington - Deserves every bit of praise coming his way. I have no qualms about calling "the Epic" the best jazz album of the current generation. Also stands out as an arranger, as can be heard from his amazing rendition of "Clair De Lune"

Steven Wilson - there's something wrong with the world, since I had to think for a while before including him, out of fear for a violent of a reaction from his haters. Especially his work with Porcupine Tree is great, definitely my kind of rock music.


There are probably others too, but I'm tired of typing.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#17
It's funny that out of everything, Charles Mingus is arguably best known for his recording of Moanin' and if I recall he did not even play on that.

Really my intention of this thread was just to see who people like and listen to. I made a similar thread about genres. Basically what my goal is is to sort of get information about what people like to better understand perspectives. A lot of people here will show an opinion on something that very clearly shows that they have experience with something and no experience with another.

Honestly though I think it might be better to just... yeah, let me do that.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#19
Really my intention of this thread was just to see who people like and listen to.


I am the son of a music teacher; trained in voice, cello and guitar to differing degrees.

I stopped counting- but not accumulating- CDs when the collection hit 5000 maybe a decade ago. Said collection covers classical, jazz, blues, funk, punk, classic rock, pop, electronica, metal, rap, alt-rock, new wave, prog, and a variety of "world music" artists & genres. Guessing, I'd say New Wave & classic rock->metal are the most common genres in it. Not a big fan of C&W or R&B, but I have a few from Johnny Cash, D'Angelo and others in there.

Gospel, and opera I leave to Mom.

Any music-playing device I own with "shuffle-play" is likely to be a roller-coaster ride for the unwary.
(Still trying to get my 160G iPod properly filled up...)
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#21
In order of from greater to least....

Paul Wardingham: My first inspiration in becoming a musician. Can be both aggressive and clean at the same time.

Plini: Dude's music sounds as chill as a turtle on weed.

Dan Munn: Sure, the guy capitalizes off of classical music written decades ago, but he does a damn good job of it.

Tosin: His thumb makes be cringe when I see him slapping, but you can't deny the guys talent.

Me: Because I can't think of a 5th one off the top of my head.
#22
Joe satriani
Zakk wylde
George lynch
Paul gilbert
Chris poland
Randy rhoads
Eric peterson
Alex hutchings
#23
1 Jerry Cantrell.

He's masterful at hard-hitting, memorable riffs, and his guitar solo's always suit the song and have a melodic, almost vocal quality to them.  He plays what is necessary for the music, and no more than that.  I have great respect for him for being a songwriter first, and a guitarist second, but he's a solid player all around.  My greatest influence as a musician and guitarist, hands down.

2 John Petrucci.

I know that he's a controversial guitarist, and he takes a ton of heat for being "soulless" or what have you.  Personally, when I was getting into playing guitar, he was and still is where I want to be in terms of skill.  Besides speed, he's incredibly versatile, and he weaves together so many different styles seamlessly.  He cannot be soulless and also dedicate so much of his time and energy into mastering his instrument as he has done.  Dream Theater's music may have worn off in appeal for me, over the years, but he's still one of my idols.

3 James Hetfield

When it comes to rhythm in metal, James Hetfield must be one of the most if not the most solid rhythm players I've ever seen on record or live.  And he does so while singing, which is a feat unto itself.  As I tried to improve singing and playing guitar simultaneously, I used him as my reference point.  Not only that, but he plays solid leads, which are always in themselves rhythmic and melodic, unlike Kirk Hammett's mindless pentatonic runs.

4 Jimi Hendrix

Despite decades of praise, to the point of over saturation, he is still and always will be a remarkable guitarist.  I learned a lot from listening to him about how to go beyond the standard chord structures, how to go beyond your typical blues riffs, how to go beyond our Major and Minor scales, and twist those things into something unique.  You can listen to a Jimi Hendrix song today, in 2017, and hardly tell that it was written 50 years ago.  His music stands the test of time like no other.

5 Ritchie Blackmore

This guy is such a great guitarist.  I mean, I may be wrong, but Rainbow was probably the earliest form of power metal.  It was a mix of crunchy, over-driven guitars with medieval-times-inspired melodies and fantastical themes, and although he has a reputation for arrogance and being a bit of an asshole, his guitar skills are underrated in my opinion.
#24
My top ten guitarists, roughly in order:

Django Reinhardt
Bert Jansch
Charlie Christian
Blind Blake
Big Bill Broonzy
Jimi Hendrix
Buddy Guy
Bill Frisell
Billy Jenkins
John Parricelli

Hopefully only the last two need any explanation, which I'm happy to give if asked.  Otherwise I think simple lists are fine, as a way of building up an impression of everyone's tastes here.  Moving on beyond those ten, my list would include:

Diblo Dibala  
Lonnie Johnson
Marc Ribot
Wes Montgomery
Jon Gomm
John Martyn

I also play bass, banjo and mandolin, but don't know enough players of any of those to list a top ten, even a top 5.  Whereas I was inspired to play guitar by certain guitarists (not those mentioned above), it wasn't musicians who inspired me on those other instruments, it was the instruments themselves.

I'm also refraining from opening it out into pianists, songwriters, singers, etc.
Last edited by jonriley64 at Sep 11, 2017,
#25
Quote by 80s_Dude
DELETED POST
Member has resigned from this forum and deleted his profile.


Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#26
dannyalcatraz I guess I missed an entertaining post
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#27
GaryBillington

I don't remember. I was just looking at his join date and that post. Less than a month between joining and leaving?!
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#28
...AND he deleted most of his posts.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#29
You're a Mod, can't you undelete them to get the gossip!!!
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#30
Sadly, not AFAIK. No juicy undeleted posts to share.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#31
julian lage
ted greene
larry carlton
muris varajic
wes
mclaughlin
(all the steely dan players)
chuck loeb
scofield
ben monder
play well

wolf
#32
A fairly generic list but at the moment its

1.Billy Corgan
2.Jerry Cantrell
3.Alex Lifeson
4.Dimebag Darrell
5.James Dean Bradfield
6.Tom Morello
7.James Hetfield
8.Ginger Wildheart
9.Scott Ian
10.Chris Spencer
#34
If we're talking bass players:

Jaco Pastorius
Les Claypool
Bootsy Collins
Bill Laswell
Flea
John Myung
Jonas Hellborg
Geezer Butler
Esperanza Spaulding
Doug Wimbish
Tony Levin
Chris Squire
Meshell Ndegeocello

...to name a few.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#35
Quote by GaryBillington
You're a Mod, can't you undelete them to get the gossip!!!


Danny can't edit posts in MT anyway since he is nit a Mod here. I edited his post but it's not what it used to say but it's better.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#36
Quote by theogonia777
Danny can't edit posts in MT anyway since he is nit a Mod here. I edited his post but it's not what it used to say but it's better.

You forgot Li'l Wayne.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#37
One word response:
PRINCE
Be excellent to each other ☺
Paully
#39
What, no Steve Stevens?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#40
What about Steve Atwater? He was responsible for more big hits than all those guys.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
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