#1
https://imgur.com/a/3kwlo
Thinking of buying this guitar for £50, owner admits to taking off the Pickguard and painted the body with "some crappy white paint" but he swears down that the pickup and eq are stock.

However I can't find and pics online of these with that pickup in or what is it not stock.

Is it worth buying to take the paint off?

How easy will it be to get a decent looking guitar from this?

It plays amazing so no problems there btw.

Thanks in advance!
Last edited by tom671 at Sep 7, 2017,
#2
Looks like it's falling to pieces.  He tried to hide the damage with paint?  A chemical stripper would be your best bet.  Then a very thin coat of clear, nitro or poly.
Last edited by skido13 at Sep 8, 2017,
#3
Quite a lot of 12 strings lead short, hard, and brutal lives. That one should have been put to rest in the ground a decade ago. I wouldn't give 50 pence for it, let alone 50 pounds.

I currently own four 12 strings, and have had 3 others over the years. So yeah, I'm qualified to make that call.

The reason the white paint is on it, is an attempt to conceal the fact that the top is practically shredded, either / or / and, from, string tension, along with poor environmental care.

The reason it, "plays well", is due to the fact it has a zero fret, and possibly the bridge could be leaning forward. When an older twelve has a lower action, it is often because the body has caved in in front of the bridge. (The zero fret acts the same as a capo, taking top nut clearance out of the action).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 8, 2017,
#6
Quote by Captaincranky
Garthman Did you count the cracks in that top?

They are likely to be varnish cracks, Cap'n. The original Eko Rangers (mid 60's to mid 70's) had very thick varnish. My 1969 Eko Ranger VI has several varnish cracks but apart from age-related dings and marks it's in great condition.
#7
Garthman 

Hmm. Looks like a piece of plywood that has been left out in the weather to me.

I can't see a single attractive feature in that guitar that would make it a worthwhile repair project in my eyes. The only thing I might do is salvage the pickup.
Last edited by Tony Done at Sep 8, 2017,
#9
I'm one of those idiots that will try to save any busted up guitar.  This is a good project to learn on.  Take off that paint then you can see what you've got.  If the top is warped you have serious problems but not terminal.  Cracks can be repaired with needle and thread, a little piece of laminate wood to glue across the cracks from inside the top,  The lifting of the cracks (usually indicates laminate top) will have to be pressed down at the same time.  Bracing can be fixed.
If you feel you have some "fix it" skills tell the seller the guitar is a lost cause but you will try to save it, offer 25.
Make sure the neck is really good with a level, just slight relief.
Last edited by skido13 at Sep 8, 2017,
#10
Quote by Tony Done
Garthman

Hmm. Looks like a piece of plywood that has been left out in the weather to me.

I can't see a single attractive feature in that guitar that would make it a worthwhile repair project in my eyes. The only thing I might do is salvage the pickup.

Tony. Oh I agree. I wouldn't touch it with a barge pole as the saying goes. Especially when old Eko's come up for sale fairly often.