#1
Hi, i'd love some info about this, I bought this recently and got pretty disappointed,  it turned out to be a Les-Paul-shaped SG, the Seymour Duncan pickups and the Piezoelectrics sound amazing though. 

This is the thing itself, trying desperately to get rid of it ASAP. Woot woot: it's up for sale  

Are they any good? Is it worth anything?

https://reverb.com/es/item/6514102-ibanez-singlecut-custom-pre-lawsuit-1973-black-gloss
Last edited by blackone666 at Sep 10, 2017,
#2
Unbelievably over priced. If all original in great shape maybe a $300 guitar. Mods don't add that much value.
#5
Too many mods. I think the value is less than you would expect due to all the mods. I own a 1976 Ibanez LP copy that's all original except the tuners that had to be replaced and a full fret replacement I did about three years ago with Tom Doyle (Les Paul's guitar tech and sound engineer). I bought it new in 1977. It's not worth more than a few hundred but I still love it and I'll keep it forever because it was my road guitar for several trips across the US in the late 70's and early 80's. The value in my case is sentimental value.

No way is the guitar you posted worth what is being asked but someone will probably want it.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Sep 10, 2017,
#7
Quote by Tony Done
I would have said more than $300/$400, but comparable guitars are going on Reverb for less than 2/3 of your asking price.


I see a lot of folks asking more but they don't seem to be selling. What you don't see is the rare set neck versions that are super collectable. I think the hype on these has dyed down dragging down the value. No way I'd pay big money for a bolt on copy when I could buy an actual Gibson LP for the same cash
Last edited by monwobobbo at Sep 11, 2017,
#9
Quote by Tony Done
monwobobbo

Yes, the bolt-on neck makes a difference compared to the "lawsuit" models on offer, I hadn't noticed that.

the vast majority of "lawsuit" models are bolt on and those are what are usually offered.  there are set neck LPs but as i said they are very rare.  the nicer ones aren't bad guitars at all but in no way really give an actual Gibson much competition in terms of sound and playability. they made nice entry level to mid level guitars back then (considering what passed for enty level back then). like many "vintage" guitars these shot up in price and then the market tanked. sellers are having a tough time with this and still ask for real money but it doesn't seem like many are willing to pay. the OP is nuts if he thinks his guitar will fetch his asking price. 
#10
monwobobbo 

Yes, the ones I looked at for comparison and reverb were a mix of set and bolt-on necks, all priced lower than the Ibanez. I don't know about quality. I had an '82 Matsumoku Westone 335 knockoff that I thought might well have been better built than Gibsons from the same period. 
#11
Quote by Tony Done
monwobobbo

Yes, the ones I looked at for comparison and reverb were a mix of set and bolt-on necks, all priced lower than the Ibanez. I don't know about quality. I had an '82 Matsumoku Westone 335 knockoff that I thought might well have been better built than Gibsons from the same period. 

not an exact comparison. certainly by the early 80s Japanese made guitars were much better than in the early to mid 70s. by that point they were indded making quality guitars that made US makers nervous. 
#12
Quote by monwobobbo
not an exact comparison. certainly by the early 80s Japanese made guitars were much better than in the early to mid 70s. by that point they were indded making quality guitars that made US makers nervous. 


Agreed, I wouldnt say those Ibanez lawsuit guitars were really the epitome of MIJ LPs. The early Tokai Love Rock, Burny FLG and Greco EGF models were sweet guitars and I would say theyre usually the ones I think of when I think of classic MIJ Gibson killers.
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#13
i had to do a double take, i thought the price was in yen.  
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#14
Quote by Rickholly74
Too many mods. I think the value is less than you would expect due to all the mods. I own a 1976 Ibanez LP copy that's all original except the tuners that had to be replaced and a full fret replacement I did about three years ago with Tom Doyle (Les Paul's guitar tech and sound engineer).


On a lot of these guitars "mods" actually bring down the value. I bought an '82 Ibanez AR-300 from a guy who had replaced the original sure-grip 1 knobs with an eight-buck set of speed knobs. The original Sure-Grips were, at the time, $45 *each* on eBay. He was a bit crestfallen to find out that the knobs, which he'd derided as "looking like skate board wheels" had cost him $200 in value on that guitar. If he'd slapped some "upgrade" aftermarket pickups on the guitar, he'd have lost even more value.

The late '70's Ibanez 2619 and 2622 series guitars (as well as the late '70's/early 80's AR-300 and AR-500s) are arguably far better guitars than Les Pauls done during the same period, featuring brass sustain blocks, smooth neck heels, great necks and ebony fretboards, outstanding pickups and tummy cuts (as well as double cutaways).
#15
I agree on two things dspellman said. One is that the late 70's early 980's Ibanez modals were really good. I still have a 1882 AM-50 that I bought new back then. While I own a lot of guitars it is still my all time go-to guitar for any type of gig. Great tone and neck. I also agree about those Ibanez speed knobs. I had to replace one that was broken by a falling mic stand. It was on a gig. Two ass-wipes fighting and falling on the low stage knocking over a mic stand that hit my guitar that was on a guitar stand. Fortunately it hit one of the tone knobs and split it in two pieces without damaging the guitar. At the time this happened in the early 90's I couldn't find a replacement Ibanez speed knob so I put a regular set of Gibson knobs on it. About 4 years ago I decided to go back to the Ibanez style original knobs. Fortunately I still had the original undamaged three but I to pay $40-45 dollars for one knob. I know it's crazy but now the guitar is back to almost original (I have changed the original tuners to Grover).
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Sep 12, 2017,
#16
Did you pay that much for it or even close to that much and now you are trying to recoup your loss or are you trying to shank somebody?

If it is the former then lesson learned and be sure to do your research before making your next purchase, if it is the latter then shame on you.
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Last edited by Evilnine at Sep 12, 2017,