#1
Morning all,

I'm looking to start building a pedal board to bring the best out of my rig. Guitar wise I play a Gibson SG w/ mini humbuckers and a Fender MIM Strat (SSS) through an Orange CR120H and Marshall 1960B 4x12. I also have a Marshall DSL100H which I should really get fixed at some point. 

Pedal wise I'm currently using a cheap tremolo pedal, EH Metal Muff w/ Top Boost, Korg Pitchblack tuner and a Jim Dunlop Cry Baby. 

Previously I was using a ProCo Rat 2 with my Marshall head but my Orange head only has a 2 band clean EQ and the head/speaker pairing isnt great. Orange heads through Marshall cabs are notoriously muddy so I've been using the powerful EQ on my Metal Muff pedal to sort of correct this. So far it's been working great but I'm planning on getting my Marshall head fixed up so I can revert back to my preferred ProCo Rat. 

My question is, what other pedals may be worth looking into. I'm intrigued by Earthquaker Devices pedals and quite fancy picking up:

Dispatch Master Reverb and Delay
Speaker Cranker 

Is there anything obvious I'm sort of missing from this board that could make a big difference to me sound?
Gibson SG 2016 1960's Tribute
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Marshall DSL100H
Marshall 1960B 4x12
ProCo Rat 2
#2
I would look at managing your gain for metal. The DSL breaks up very early. You have a clean channel on that which is good enough for many clean guitarists that use pedals. The cab isn't Vintage 30 so you will be using the G12. I would get Boss pedals for a Marshall setup and make do without true bypass. EQD is more for clean amps or versatile high gain amps. Orange and Marshall are pretty much their own tones which is why we buy them. You can't go wrong with Boss everything on your Marshall, including delay and reverb. Even though most Boss aren't true bypass, they still sound good on a Marshall, which means good tone.
Dean MAB1. Epiphone Annihilation V. EVH 5150III. Orange PPC112. Earthquaker devices - The Warden, Arrows, Acapulco Gold, Levitation, Night Wire. TS9, DD3, GE7, NS2, LS2, Polytune mini, Small Stone. SM57. Focusrite. LINUX!
Last edited by Deermonic at Sep 11, 2017,
#3
There are 1,000s of pedals on the market that you're missing.  You probably don't need them all.

You say nothing about the sound you're going for, therefore realistically the only advice that can be given regarding additional pedals is to get a multi effects pedal such as the Zoom G3 or Line 6 M9.  With these, you can experiment and find the effects you actually use.  Then, and only then can you start considering what you genuinely NEED on your pedalboard.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
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#5
There's no sense in asking us what you're missing. What you're missing is the sounds you want to create that you cannot create with your existing gear. Without knowing that, all we can do is help you to waste your money.
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#6
Well I guess it all depends on what kind of tones are being chased.... a phaser and an octave fuzz might be cool.
#7
IOW, the more you tell us, the more we can help.
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#8
You are missing a good power supply. I use Cioks but Voodoo Labs are also great.

I think that the Orange sounds best through V30, but I enjoy the DSL through G12T75s. I have one on the way for my DSL as I like that pairing. The Orange should work fine as a backup head. My favourite speaker for the DSL is the G12M65.

You already have a solid rig. Good guitars, good amp and good speakers. Also, he RAT is a great unit and the Pitchblack is a great tool. I am not very fond of Wahs! I have  Dunlop one too, but I am not a wah user so I cannot judge the pedal. 

If you still feel that you would like to add some pedals to your rig, I would recommend an overdrive. While I like the RAT, I think that an overdrive is very useful. My recommendation would be to go for a TS9 or SD1 style overdrive. These cut some bass and some of the ear piercing highs. This allow for more saturation without low end muddiness.

If you are looking for some excitement to your sound you should look into a delay or modulation. I would get delay before modulation, but that is simply my opinion. I would suggest that  you try a few pedals. I really like the Boss DM-2w, DD-3 and the MXR Carbon Copy. I do not need tap tampo feature or the subdivisions, so I tend to go for the that sound best to my ears. When it comes to modulation, on the budget end, EHX have 3 great pedals, the Small Clone Chorus; Neo Clone Chorus and Small Stone Phaser. I really love MXR modulation pedals, which are priced slightly higher, especially the micro flanger and micro chorus. Actually, my favourite chorus is their stereo chorus but I enjoy it in a 2 amp setup. The Boss CE2-w is another great unit but quite pricey.

I would recommend go to all local stores and try as many pedals as you can. Then decide what you would like to add to your rig. Then narrow it down to which particular model you would like.
#9
All good points guys, I apologise for not being clearer on what it is I'm actually trying to achieve. I play in a rock band with fingers in the doom, prog, psych pies. 

There's a definite 1950's/60s rock n roll vibe to some of our stuff (albeit a lot darker) so the tremolo and strat combo sounds great.

One thing I've never really understood is the differences between fuzz/distortion/overdrive etc. To me it all basically sounds the same once I've EQd it so I'm wondering whether anybody can maybe go into a bit of detail there along with some pedal example/suggestions?
Gibson SG 2016 1960's Tribute
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Marshall DSL100H
Marshall 1960B 4x12
ProCo Rat 2
#11
Quote by rich.bendall
One thing I've never really understood is the differences between fuzz/distortion/overdrive etc. To me it all basically sounds the same once I've EQd it so I'm wondering whether anybody can maybe go into a bit of detail there along with some pedal example/suggestions?
Probably Danny's got you covered there, but as simply as I can put it while getting to the key differences:

Overdrives are light "hairyness" similar to a tube amp on the edge of breakup. Sometimes they are used on their own to achieve this sound, but very often in heavy rock contexts they are used to boost the level of a signal into an already-distorted amp to get more gain out of it and shape the signal. Most obviously you have the Tube Screamer and it's ilk, which provide a heavy mid-emphasis which helps reduce muddiness from bass in the input signal while increasing gain for metal and hard rock sounds. Think Tube Screamer, Blues Driver, Fulltone OCD.

Distortions are meant to be used stand-alone to imitate the sound of an amp with substantial levels of overdrive, for a proper distorted rock sound in a box. Sometimes modelled on particular amps (i.e. "Marshall-in-a-box"), sometimes just "Distortion". Some can be used like overdrives can be to boost input signals, some less so, but in general the focus is more on their use as an independent sound unto themselves. Think Boss DS1, ProCo Rat, most "Metal" pedals.

Fuzzes are essentially a category of distortion pedals using fairly primitive circuits from the '60s and '70s. They typically have quite a thick sound, often less clarity than what would be categorised as a distortion, and really it's just a particular flavour. Key "flavours" of fuzz are the Fuzz Face and its descendants, the Big Muff and its descendants, and then a few others like octave fuzzes which may resemble the Foxx Tone Machine, the Octavia, the MXR Blue Box, or probably some others.

Some pedals are described as hybrids between these categories - I've heard the Big Muff called a fuzz/distortion, for example. Personally, I think the more pertinent point is that these are fairly vague categorisations that describe the role of a pedal, and the "extent" of it (i.e. how much distortion it can produce), so there aren't especially clear-cut lines between them.
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I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Sep 11, 2017,
#12
The Metal Muff will cover fuzz and heavier settings.  I would suggest getting a lighter overdrive pedal for when you play Bluesier or less saturated  riffs but still need a boost - something like an AC Booster from Xotic, which will retain your basic tone but add a little dirt.

A delay pedal is really the big obvious thing you're missing.  Get something with a tap tempo and run it through your loop. Three main uses for this would be a slap back echo, quarter note type delays to add sustain and slight ambiance to lead lines or arpeggios, or full on ambient or trippy percussive uses.  

Fuzz, distortion and overdrive all sort of overlap, but you can differentiate them as follows : fuzz is woolly and sounds fuzzy - sounds great for slower  sustained riffs and chaos ( Think Black Sabbath Paranoid Album, or Purple Haze Hendrix), Distortion is sharper, tighter and quicker, so it's used for faster playing -  Metallica, Maiden, Slayer etc., Overdrive is much less saturated and more organic -  which is why blues players tend to use it - you get dirt, but you retain way more of the natural tone of the guitar and amp than by using Distortion or Fuzz.  Overdrive can also be used to further drive your amp's distortion channel or even drive other dirt pedals since it's not too saturated -  you can pair it with other drive sounds without things getting too crazy. 

Keep in mind, when you're jamming or playing a gig, you can't realistically adjust pedal settings and EQ between songs without screwing your gain staging - you need the ability to simply have a variety of drive sounds that you can trigger with your pedals during a show.  For example, I use an Xotic AC Booster ( light overdrive), a BB Preamp ( Marshallesque but organic), Pharaoh Fuzz ( full on fuzz insanity), and the drive channel on my amp ( either set to a Blues tone or a Metal tone, depending on the gig).  With those, either alone or in various combinations, I cover a lot of ground.  
#13
My suggestion is to get a decent modeler/multiFX. It's that last part that will help you determine what you really want in your pedalboard.

It's nice to be able to pull up a couple of different delay pedal models, an octaver maybe, etc. to play with and see what works. If it's something you think you can't live without, then go hunt down a really good one. But for now, something like a Pod XT for $80-100 can allow you to try a whole lot of options, and then you can sell it off for what you paid when you've figured it all out.
#14
rich.bendall Try putting a boost pedal in front of your ProCo Rat. You're welcome. 
Jackson Pro Dinky
Peavey Valveking 50 w/ Eminence Texas Heat speaker
Peavey 1x12 extension cab
Dunlop 535Q Wah
TC Electronic Hypergravity Compressor
Wampler Pinnacle Distortion
Wampler Pinnacle Deluxe (v2)
Fulltone OCD
EHX Bad Stone Phaser
EHX Pitchfork w/ Expression Pedal
Wampler Faux Tape Echo
TC Electronic HOF Reverb
TC Electronic Ditto Looper
#15
Quote by K33nbl4d3
There's no sense in asking us what you're missing. What you're missing is the sounds you want to create that you cannot create with your existing gear. Without knowing that, all we can do is help you to waste your money.


Well, but we're very good at it.
#16
Quote by soulgrenade
rich.bendall Try putting a boost pedal in front of your ProCo Rat. You're welcome. 

What will that actually do though? Like, I understand that pairing a boost pedal with a distortion pedal makes a difference but what will it actually do to my sound? When would I likely use that sort of effect etc?
Gibson SG 2016 1960's Tribute
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Marshall DSL100H
Marshall 1960B 4x12
ProCo Rat 2
#17
Quote by rich.bendall
What will that actually do though? Like, I understand that pairing a boost pedal with a distortion pedal makes a difference but what will it actually do to my sound? When would I likely use that sort of effect etc?

To boost your RAT for lead tones. Boosting before would increase the gain/distortion. Boosting after increases the volume if there is more headroom available in your amp. Depends on what you are looking for, I would prefer using an overdrive with my DSL as it already has quite a bit of gain. 

If you are looking for some excitement look for a delay or modulation pedal.
Last edited by Gab_Azz at Sep 13, 2017,
#18
rich.bendall Placing a boost pedal in front of a distortion pedal allows you to increase the dynamic range of the distortion pedal by adding more volume but at a manageable level. That and it increases the overall usability of the distortion pedal.  Here is an article that goes into detail: https://www.vein-tap.com/why-use-clean-boost-guitar-pedal/
Jackson Pro Dinky
Peavey Valveking 50 w/ Eminence Texas Heat speaker
Peavey 1x12 extension cab
Dunlop 535Q Wah
TC Electronic Hypergravity Compressor
Wampler Pinnacle Distortion
Wampler Pinnacle Deluxe (v2)
Fulltone OCD
EHX Bad Stone Phaser
EHX Pitchfork w/ Expression Pedal
Wampler Faux Tape Echo
TC Electronic HOF Reverb
TC Electronic Ditto Looper
#19
I agree with Gary above. You can spend $300 on two or three pedals and still not be pleased because you are searching for a sound you can't put your finger on. Buy a multi-effects pedal. At least you'll get a taste of pretty much every kind of effects pedal  like OD's, distortions, EQ's, compressors, phasers, chourus, delays, reverbs, amp and cab sims and many more all in one convenient and programmable pedal. All the effects may not all be to your liking but at least you will get a taste of what each type offers and you'll save yourself a lot of money and frustration. After you know exactly what effects you are looking for you can try a few particular one-off pedals.  
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Sep 13, 2017,
#21
Given the above, I'm considering the following:

-Earthquaker Devices The Warden Compressor
-Earthquaker Devices Speaker Cranker Overdrive
-Earthquaker Devices Tone Job EQ Pedal
-Earthquaker Dispatch Master Reverb and Delay

My thinking behind the Speaker Cranker is to kind of build base on which to build my tone from. I'm thinking about pairing this with either my ProCo Rat 2 or later a fuzz pedal (e.g. the Hoof) to kind of provide a boost (not a volume boost) for my sound. 

Definitely agree about an EQ pedal and I think I also need a compressor for my more chord based stuff. It's so easy for me to lose the clarity of the notes when I play at higher gain but I only play at the higher gain settings to increase the sustain. A good compressor pedal sounds like an ideal solution to this problem. EQ's an EQ, I know what it does and how useful it'll be. I just need to get one. 

Regarding the Dispatch Master, it's just a wonderful Reverb / Delay pedal that quite a lot of my favourite bands (e.g. Uncle Acid and Elder) use. It ticks both boxes of a reverb and a delay and will just do wonders for my clean sound. 

Thing's I'm also going to consider will be a noise gate and a phaser (for solos). I'll hold off on the noise gate though as I've been playing at really quite high volumes recently and not had any issues, which I put down to the fact that I only have the gain on my ProCo set to around 9:30am. 

Now, to get saving haha. Thanks for all the advice everybody!
Gibson SG 2016 1960's Tribute
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Marshall DSL100H
Marshall 1960B 4x12
ProCo Rat 2