#1
Whew...post #1. I'll try not to sound as new as I am. Guess I should start with I am completely obsessed with learning guitar. I am not very good at it, but put in the time, watch the youtubes, read these boards, etc.

Ahem... so here's what I'm wondering, if any would be so kind as to offer their thoughts/personal experience.

I am very new and realize that what I'm asking is a long term goal for me to set. But when do you believe you went from running scales/practicing fingering/etc to actually being able to express yourself via the lead... Not as concerned with the rhythm because I believe I 'felt' that when I learned about 5 chords and could play most songs...

No, what I'm wondering is specific to solo'ing... because it's what I believe is where my practice is now focusing. So without rambling further... I'm simply looking for when, during your practicing 'career' did you kinda suddenly realize you were expressing yourself during a lead vs. running scales and riffs you knew would 'amaze'....

-Slap
#2
Quote by Slapknot
Whew...post #1. I'll try not to sound as new as I am. Guess I should start with I am completely obsessed with learning guitar. I am not very good at it, but put in the time, watch the youtubes, read these boards, etc.

Ahem... so here's what I'm wondering, if any would be so kind as to offer their thoughts/personal experience.

I am very new and realize that what I'm asking is a long term goal for me to set. But when do you believe you went from running scales/practicing fingering/etc to actually being able to express yourself via the lead... Not as concerned with the rhythm because I believe I 'felt' that when I learned about 5 chords and could play most songs...

No, what I'm wondering is specific to solo'ing... because it's what I believe is where my practice is now focusing. So without rambling further... I'm simply looking for when, during your practicing 'career' did you kinda suddenly realize you were expressing yourself during a lead vs. running scales and riffs you knew would 'amaze'....

-Slap

Big mistake there - you can never be a good lead guitarist unless you're first a competent rhythm player...and 5 chords does not a good rhythm guitarist make. Likewise you can never properly learn and understand a solo to a unless you already know how to play the rest of the song.

Playing the guitar is just that, there is no lead and rhythm really - those are just terms used to describe parts of songs. A guitarist is a guitarist, lead parts are generally harder and fiddlier than their respective rhythm parts so you need to be a better guitarist to play them.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#3
Hey dude.

And what happens when, in the future, your mate who plays rhythm in your band doesn't show up for band practice... Could you fill in for him?

Steven Seagull is correct. Try not to focus on just learning solos and lead parts because this will hold you back in the future.

And anyway, learning a shit load of chords all over the neck (and more importantly, the intervals that create them!) will help you to get to grips with the placement of the notes. This is invaluable for soloing. As being able to pick out your root note, and then all the other notes around it is far more beneficial than learning scale shapes and boxes. This is why so many people will tell you to learn the notes on the fretboard.

Be a guitarist first, both lead and rhythm have interchangable advantages

We don't mean to preach dude, it's just that from experience, we are offering our advice. You shouldn't dismiss the benefits of becoming a competent rhythm player as it will certainly help you achieve your goals faster.
#4
Right on gents! Just what I needed... it's what keeps me wrapped up in forums instead of paying my local guitar instructor!

Ya guys are dead on and it warrants some further explaining. I have certainly not dismissed rhythm and did not mean to give that impression. Right now I have set up my practice time so that I spend 1 week on chops/scales/etc and 1 week on chords... I changed it up a bit once I incorporated the "slow practice' techniques for leads. This way I get a break each week to play some 'fun' stuff rather than at 50bpm.

I also did not mean to act as though I felt 5 chords was 'enough'. I was only saying that once I learned 5 chords, and could play a few songs, I was able to 'feel' the music while I was playing the chord.

However, I have not achieved this level by far with solo'n. Hence, why I was asking.

But I follow where ya guys are goin. Basically the same answer that seems to come back for ANY question I have - practice practice practice.

Back to the strings.... peace
#5
Quote by Slapknot
Right on gents! Just what I needed... it's what keeps me wrapped up in forums instead of paying my local guitar instructor!

Ya guys are dead on and it warrants some further explaining. I have certainly not dismissed rhythm and did not mean to give that impression. Right now I have set up my practice time so that I spend 1 week on chops/scales/etc and 1 week on chords... I changed it up a bit once I incorporated the "slow practice' techniques for leads. This way I get a break each week to play some 'fun' stuff rather than at 50bpm.

I also did not mean to act as though I felt 5 chords was 'enough'. I was only saying that once I learned 5 chords, and could play a few songs, I was able to 'feel' the music while I was playing the chord.

However, I have not achieved this level by far with solo'n. Hence, why I was asking.

But I follow where ya guys are goin. Basically the same answer that seems to come back for ANY question I have - practice practice practice.

Back to the strings.... peace

You shouldn't separate things like that - ultimately chords and scales are the same thing, just arranged differently and you should be making an effort to understand that relationship from the outset. Also there's very little value in practicing straight scale patterns - all that really does is make you good at playing scales, and that's just as boring to listen to as it is to do.

Rather than practice running scale patterns up and down construct yourself practical exercises from them. By that I mean stuff you can actually use, so make runs that incorporate position shifts and slides, things that move you up and down the fretboard a bit. Or make exercises that use hammer ons and other legato techniques, run up and down the chords of the scale in diads or triads, play braids (those "interlocking" 3 or 4 note ascending/descending runs)

That has several benefits....it gets you used to actually using a scale and working with it as opposed to just rigidly following patterns, it familiarises you with the sounds of the scale and the various interval permutations, it gets you used to using the scale all ove rthe neck in perhaps less obvious ways and you end up practicing something that you can actually use in your playing.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com