#1
Heya, my band is playing "Foxy Lady" by Jimi Hendrix, and I'm having trouble finding anything interesting to play. The solo takes place over an F#7add#9 chord(the way we play it). I usually use the pentatonic to highlight the changes between chords, and the solo just sounds boring and drawn-out when I use the pentatonic alone. I'm also not really sure what scales 7add#9 chords are built from.

Any help would be appreciated.
#2
Mess with rhythmic ideas and dynamics. Like use harmonics and double stops, slides, bends etc. Connect everything together. Maybe add some chromatics. Just be creative really.

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#3
Quote by Declan87
Heya, my band is playing "Foxy Lady" by Jimi Hendrix, and I'm having trouble finding anything interesting to play. The solo takes place over an F#7add#9 chord(the way we play it). I usually use the pentatonic to highlight the changes between chords, and the solo just sounds boring and drawn-out when I use the pentatonic alone. I'm also not really sure what scales 7add#9 chords are built from.

Any help would be appreciated.


7#9 chords (the infamous 'Hendrix Chord') get their character from blurring the boundary between a dominant tonality and a minor flavour.. the #9 is effectively a minor 3rd.. so you have a major AND minor 3rd in the same chord...

the most natural sounding group of notes to use over this would be mixolydian.. but you need to introduce a minor 3rd and play in that gap between dominant and minor... so consider experimenting with F# minor pentatonic, F# Dorian and F# mixolydian.. those 3 are the 'safest' and most obvious clumps of notes to choose from... lots of mileage to be had from bending that minor 3rd all kinds of distances

don't forget you can connect up notes chromatically to add flavour... such as connecting up the 4th & 5th with a chromatic note (the b5 blues scale note in other words), or moving from the b7 to the root is always good... chromatic movement downwards from the minor 3rd to the root can sound good in the right place...

with the hendrix chord you have an inherently 'unstable' harmonic environment due to the clash of the minor & major 3rd... so your listeners ear can generally take a lot more in the way of 'outside' notes than if you had say, a nice major 7th chord

for very long single chord vamps... listening to Frank Zappa might give you some ideas... his stuff can be 5,6,7 minutes long on one chord... frequently modal static vamps... i.e. dorian or lydian... he tends to get variety and interest by varying the note density, volume, register.. and of course, having the guys backing him change what they're doing to support the guitar... there's nothing worse than trying to introduce light & shade into an improvised solo, only to find the other guys are blindly hammering away without listening to what you're doing
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