#1
Is it possible to find the intervals for the key of D by doing the following? Is there more information here that I can see?

First I found the notes in the D Major scale by using the WWHWWWH 'formula'
This is what I got: D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D

Now, can I use this information to find the intervals for the key of D?
I've seen interval patterns like this: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 and ones with b's and #'s in them, are they different for every key? If I'm jumping way ahead of myself here a link to a helpful article would be ideal, otherwise it'd be nice to get some guidance on where to go.. what to learn first and whatnot.
There's quite a few things to learn and I don't want to learn something out of order and have to go back and fill in the gaps.

Thanks in advance to any help
#2
i would love to help out but i dont really understand what your saying..

Edit:
are you talking about 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
being the intervals of the major scale?

if so then
1 would be D,
2 would be E
3 ..... F#
4...... G

etc.

C major would be
1....C
2....D
3....E
etc.

the b and # indicated in the 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
indicated how you modify the major scale
to make a natural minor you would take 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
so if apply that to the Dmaj scale above you Dmin

Before D, E, F#, G, A, B, C# (1 2 3 4 5 6 7)
After D, E, F, G, A, Bb, C (1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7)


did that help?
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Last edited by victoryaloy at Nov 15, 2008,
#3
Dam..

I'm trying my best to get my point across...
How do I find the intervals of different keys?
#4
Quote by JHFendrix
Is it possible to find the intervals for the key of D by doing the following? Is there more information here that I can see?

First I found the notes in the D Major scale by using the WWHWWWH 'formula'
This is what I got: D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D

Now, can I use this information to find the intervals for the key of D?


any major key uses the same intervals... y'know.. the 2nd is always a major 2nd, the 3rd is always a major 3rd etc... this is regardless of what key you're in...

to find the intervals, I guess you could add up the number of W's and H's between say D and F#, (i.e. W + W is two whole steps... a major 3rd in other words), but you're better off just learning that stuff than trying to extract it every time from the intervals between scale tones

forgive me if I misunderstood what you're asking
out of here
#5
i added more stuff to my first post..
the intervals are the same for all major scales WWHWWWH
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
#6
The "1-2-3-4-5-6-7" system that you're describing is used to describe the intervals comprising a scale or chord according to their relationship to the major scale. The numbers themselves each correspond to a degree within the major scale. Which major scale (as in, which key) is irrelevant. D major, like any other major scale, is simply described as having the degrees 1-2-3-4-5-6-7. It describes the intervals in the major scale as an entity, not in any one key.

When you see something like 1-2-3-#4-5-6-7, it's describing the intervals comprising that particular scale as they relate to the major scale. In this particular case, you can see that all of the intervals are identical to those of the major scale, save for the fourth degree, which is raised (this scale in particular in the lydian mode). What this tells you is that, in order to construct this scale (say, in C), we can simply build a major scale off of the same root...

C-D-E-F-G-A-B

...and raise the fourth degree, giving us...

C-D-E-F#-G-A-B-C

This applies to any key. If we take the F major scale...

F-G-A-Bb-C-D-E

...and raise the fourth, we get...

F-G-A-B-C-D-E
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
@victoryaloy: yea, you nailed it

Everyone else did too, with their own twist.
This really helped, thank you all

I've been trying to figure it out on my own for a while and i couldnt find anything that explained this specifically. I had created an account here a little while back and this is my first post.. well, the first post in the thread was.. I'm impressed with the timing and the quality of the help, anyway, enough of the spam, thanks all, ill see you around