#1
would somebody please tell me(coz im a noob) whats the process of making a song from just coming up with a new idea to having out on cd.
#2
o god. well, BASICALLY, you record the parts mix them to the proper levels, edit and burn to a CD.

that probably doesn't help. Can you be more specific in what you want to know?
#4
Well, first off, you have to have a good idea, and inspiration. From there, you start to write down some of it, to get a good, solid peice of information before you forget. Then, start riffing. Find a good spot that you think will match the tone of your idea. Once you get a good spot there, start writing lyrics to it. If its good enough, it should come to you, but not always. Once you get this bit down, start coming up with Rythm, if you want it. Then, come up with a bass track to it, and also, drums. Thats if your doing it solo. If not, then other members of your band can help come up with the drum and bass part. Once you get that down, start rehearsing it. See what works with it, what doesn't, start tweaking it, and work it out until you get a good song out of it.

Now, for recording it. I would suggest starting out with guitar, then adding bass, then vocals, then drums. I say this because it is a common, and somewhat true, theory that goes something like this: Guitar can hold its own rythm, Bass takes it beat from the guitar, vocals keep on time with the bass, and the drums keep in time with the vocals. It makes the recording process easier and better formed. Mixing and Mastering comes next, and thats all up to you. Then, finish it up, and once you get more songs done, make a demo and find a companie that does designs and creation, and get a whole bunch of copies done, and distribute. Thats the process I use.
Quote by Jack Off Jill
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Quote by JewMasatFlex
if that is why you are playing guitar, then stop. play guitar because you like music, not because you want some pussy
#5
Technically, my friend, that's the process of making a CD, not just a song. Damn misleading titles...but, yeah CrazyFrog pretty much got it.
#6
if you're looking for a cheap way to record, i'd suggest you check out the Line 6 Toneport UX1. it's affordable and fairly simple to use though the sound ain't that great. it's a good way to get a basic idea of how recordings are done and what not. hope that helps
#7
Well, i usually first make lyrics. Music is but a tool to deliver the message - of course the music has to be fitting tho' <.<

Anyway, after the lyrics, i set up a beat by drum-machine, and i find a riff that goes well with the basic rythm, then i add random drumsounds-effects, other than the ground-beat to fit the riff, then i find out how to fit the lyrics into the music, which i do simply by.. like.. I extend the riffs, untill i can fit in all the words in the tempo and way that i want them..

I guess it's that.. kinda.. Then you can put on various effects and stuff on riffs, vocals, drums, whatever - personally i use the computer-program Cubase.. Then when i'm done with it, i "normalize" each track to get a kinda fixed volume, and more "fill".
Then mess with the EQ curve, mostly on the guitar, usually to turn up the middle abit..

Um.. let's see.. Then i "Export" per Audio Mixdown to a Wav-file, and TADAH- You got a file you can play on the computer, send to others, or burn down on a CD to make a demo, or a master-copy ^^

Not sure if this is what you ment.. but.. eh.. i take the chance.

By the way - anyone who read this are welcome to give additions, or a better way to do this, and about improvements - i was never a genius at computers, hehe.
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#8
Quote by paulseagull08
well after writing the song were do you record it on what and how and how do you make the cd?

Well, you can home record it, and get a product that is not always its best, or you can pay to get it worked in a proffesional studio. Its a little expensive, but thats why you pay for it to get, persay, an album done.

But for the home recording, you can just look up recording equipment on Guitar center to get an idea of what you will need.
Quote by Jack Off Jill
Did your friends leave the room to go to the bathroom excessively? If so, they were masturbating.

Quote by JewMasatFlex
if that is why you are playing guitar, then stop. play guitar because you like music, not because you want some pussy
#9
Quote by GuitarCrazyFrog
Well, first off, you have to have a good idea, and inspiration. From there, you start to write down some of it, to get a good, solid peice of information before you forget. Then, start riffing. Find a good spot that you think will match the tone of your idea. Once you get a good spot there, start writing lyrics to it. If its good enough, it should come to you, but not always. Once you get this bit down, start coming up with Rythm, if you want it. Then, come up with a bass track to it, and also, drums. Thats if your doing it solo. If not, then other members of your band can help come up with the drum and bass part. Once you get that down, start rehearsing it. See what works with it, what doesn't, start tweaking it, and work it out until you get a good song out of it.

Now, for recording it. I would suggest starting out with guitar, then adding bass, then vocals, then drums. I say this because it is a common, and somewhat true, theory that goes something like this: Guitar can hold its own rythm, Bass takes it beat from the guitar, vocals keep on time with the bass, and the drums keep in time with the vocals. It makes the recording process easier and better formed. Mixing and Mastering comes next, and thats all up to you. Then, finish it up, and once you get more songs done, make a demo and find a companie that does designs and creation, and get a whole bunch of copies done, and distribute. Thats the process I use.

So you dont record it all in one?
#10
Quote by paulseagull08
So you dont record it all in one?


No, when you record it, if you do it all at once, it will sound HORRIBLE. To record it, you have to do it once at a time. But, using the process I told you, you can listen to what you already recorded while recording your part and it helps you keep in time with what your recording, but like I said, Guitarists don't usually need other instruments to keep rythm, so that should be done first. And you build on that, using all parts previously recorded to keep rythm.
Quote by Jack Off Jill
Did your friends leave the room to go to the bathroom excessively? If so, they were masturbating.

Quote by JewMasatFlex
if that is why you are playing guitar, then stop. play guitar because you like music, not because you want some pussy
#11
is i like this:
(doesnt have to be this order)
guitar records
bass records (listening to sounds of guitar but guitar not playing)
and so on????
#13
Quote by paulseagull08
is it????/


Don't double post. The answer to every single question you've asked is : It depends. There are a thousand different ways of doing it.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
Quote by GuitarCrazyFrog

Now, for recording it. I would suggest starting out with guitar, then adding bass, then vocals, then drums. I say this because it is a common, and somewhat true, theory that goes something like this: Guitar can hold its own rythm, Bass takes it beat from the guitar, vocals keep on time with the bass, and the drums keep in time with the vocals.



I suggest the exact opposite Drums>guitars>vocals/other stuff.

Bass needs to follow the drum playing not the guitar.
#15
have the drums play to a click track. Then record bass. Then Guitars. Then anything extra. Then vocals last.
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#16
Quote by GuitarCrazyFrog
No, when you record it, if you do it all at once, it will sound HORRIBLE.


Isn't that how a lot of musicians do it? Obviously, not noobs, but I read that Clapton, for example, likes to record things live. I must be misunderstanding, but doesn't that just mean they mic up the amps and then play? Or do they play one at a time?
#17
Quote by GuitarCrazyFrog
Now, for recording it. I would suggest starting out with guitar, then adding bass, then vocals, then drums. I say this because it is a common, and somewhat true, theory that goes something like this: Guitar can hold its own rythm, Bass takes it beat from the guitar, vocals keep on time with the bass, and the drums keep in time with the vocals. It makes the recording process easier and better formed.


You couldn't be more wrong.

My bands seeing a studio every couple days or so, and the engineer has us all play at the same time, then after a couple takes, he pulls out the best drum track, and then we do over the bass, the guitar, and vocals,etc. Doing drums last would be impossible - and a guitar holding its own rhythm? what? I'm 100% positive that NO ONE records by guitar first.

Oh, and if you're not in a studio, from experience just having everyone play at once with mics a couple feet away from the bass and guitar amps works nicely, then add the vocals on top of that.
Last edited by locomotive4 at Nov 16, 2008,
#18
Quote by gabcd86
Isn't that how a lot of musicians do it? Obviously, not noobs, but I read that Clapton, for example, likes to record things live. I must be misunderstanding, but doesn't that just mean they mic up the amps and then play? Or do they play one at a time?


Van Halen did their first album as a full band and in only a couple of takes too.

You have to have pretty good (and expensive usually) gear to get it all happening at once. You'd need a mixer/audio interface/etc etc that has enough inputs for the drums, guitars, vocals, bass etc...and i think you'd have to setup the place in a way to avoid sound crossing over into other mics or something (not sure though, i've never done a full band recording before with more than 2 mics :P)


I reckon if your band knows your songs really really well, then make a crappy recording (doesn't have to be great, but as long as the tempo and song cues are preserved) of the whole band playing, then go into the studio and record your drummer playing along to that recording. Then add in bass, guitars then vocals+any others. That way you pick up all the subtle tempo changes that your band may subconsciously make.
#20
Unless it is unusual circumstances, the Vocals should ALWAYS be last. And the bass and guitar need to take the beat from the drummer, not vice versa. A good drummer can compensate for slight timing differences from the guitar and stuff when its live, but recording, you dont need to. Why not get it perfect?
#21
Quote by Molsonthemaggot
you quit music.
because you're dumb as shit.

Oh fuck off.

Everybody has to start somewhere.
My name is Danny. Call me that.
#23
Quote by asator
Oh fuck off.

Everybody has to start somewhere.


Thank you for saying that. I was about to say that myself.

And, the people have spoken. They prefer to do it that way, Apparently I just have an unorthodox way of doing it, , But I guess you should do it that way. But, besides that, what I say is a good process to writing, recording, and production, or atleast I think.
Quote by Jack Off Jill
Did your friends leave the room to go to the bathroom excessively? If so, they were masturbating.

Quote by JewMasatFlex
if that is why you are playing guitar, then stop. play guitar because you like music, not because you want some pussy
#24
What I'm going to do is record scratch rhythm guitar/vocal track than throwing the drums than the bass, than throw the extra shit on top.
#26
Quote by GuitarCrazyFrog

Now, for recording it. I would suggest starting out with guitar, then adding bass, then vocals, then drums. I say this because it is a common, and somewhat true, theory that goes something like this: Guitar can hold its own rythm, Bass takes it beat from the guitar, vocals keep on time with the bass, and the drums keep in time with the vocals. It makes the recording process easier and better formed. Mixing and Mastering comes next, and thats all up to you. Then, finish it up, and once you get more songs done, make a demo and find a companie that does designs and creation, and get a whole bunch of copies done, and distribute. Thats the process I use.


Typically, its more common to record the drums first with a click track in the drummers headphones. This ensures a solid tempo throughout the song.

Then, bass is usually added, followed by rhythm guitar, then lead guitar and any keyboards, etc... Then vocals are last.