#1
i want to be able to look at a fretboard and be able to pick out which is what note. whats a good way to learn this?
Quote by freddaahh
I just head-desked so hard I went through the floor and came out in Mongolia.
#2
Well, to some extent, it's all about memorising.

I'd say start with the notes on the low E and A strings, as most chords are rooted on those strings. Learn the notes up to the 12th fret. They just repeat from there, since it's an octave above.
Using the power chord shape, you can quickly find octaves on higher strings: 2 strings and 2 frets up = octave up.
Thickest and Thinnest strings are both tuned to E, thus have the same notes on them, only 2 octaves apart.

Keep those things in mind. They may sound obvious, but they helped me a lot.
#3
Quote by sashki
Well, to some extent, it's all about memorising.

I'd say start with the notes on the low E and A strings, as most chords are rooted on those strings. Learn the notes up to the 12th fret. They just repeat from there, since it's an octave above.
Using the power chord shape, you can quickly find octaves on higher strings: 2 strings and 2 frets up = octave up.
Thickest and Thinnest strings are both tuned to E, thus have the same notes on them, only 2 octaves apart.

Keep those things in mind. They may sound obvious, but they helped me a lot.

thanks
is their any peticular method to making this easier?
Quote by freddaahh
I just head-desked so hard I went through the floor and came out in Mongolia.
#4
Quote by sashki
Well, to some extent, it's all about memorising.

I'd say start with the notes on the low E and A strings, as most chords are rooted on those strings. Learn the notes up to the 12th fret. They just repeat from there, since it's an octave above.
Using the power chord shape, you can quickly find octaves on higher strings: 2 strings and 2 frets up = octave up.
Thickest and Thinnest strings are both tuned to E, thus have the same notes on them, only 2 octaves apart.

Keep those things in mind. They may sound obvious, but they helped me a lot.



I'd like to add remember to use your inlays. They're there to help you find your way around. It's pretty much just basic common sense things like that. Also, try making charts and things like that. Learning like this may seem like kind of an insult to your intelligence, but just remember, learning to play an instrument is almost like learning a new language, you need to start at the very basics befor you're fluent.
#5
Quote by Footallica?
I'd like to add remember to use your inlays. They're there to help you find your way around. It's pretty much just basic common sense things like that. Also, try making charts and things like that. Learning like this may seem like kind of an insult to your intelligence, but just remember, learning to play an instrument is almost like learning a new language, you need to start at the very basics befor you're fluent.

what do you mean by charts?
Quote by freddaahh
I just head-desked so hard I went through the floor and came out in Mongolia.
#6
Quote by sk8erk1d1313
what do you mean by charts?

Like, draw a fretboard with six circles on each fret, one where each string would be. Go in and fill in each circle at every fret on every string with whatever note it is.
#7
Quote by Flying Couch
Like, draw a fretboard with six circles on each fret, one where each string would be. Go in and fill in each circle at every fret on every string with whatever note it is.

alright ill try that thanks
Quote by freddaahh
I just head-desked so hard I went through the floor and came out in Mongolia.