#1
Hi Guy.

On the Hughes and Kettner "TriAmp MK2" Amp it has a Midi input. What is the purpus of installing a MIDI Controller and what"s it for? Thank you.
#2
Hi guy? Which one?

MIDI, or Musical Intstrument Digital Interface, essentially is not music, but a series of data being sent back and forth from a controller to another interface, whether it be an amplifier, software etc.

Essentially, you can control all of the settings on the amp via a MIDI foot controller, like switching channels as an example.

MIDI controllers can be used for lots of other stuff too...but mostly, when its a foot controller for a guitar amp, it is for controlling channel switching, presets and those kinds of things.
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.
#3
Midi was originally conceived as a method of simulating different sounds with keyboards/synths. There are a wide variety of messages within the Midi language, some of which have come to serve multiple purposes, and some of which have become effective in helping to control guitar rigs.

Guitarists generally use Midi for two main purposes: for component/preset switching, and for it's continuous controller functions. With the correct assortment of gear and a little time programming everything you can (for example) change your amp channel, turn on three effects, turn off two others, and change your expression pedal from controlling volume to controlling pitch...and you can do it all by stepping on a single switch. You can then recall this preset and dozens more (if you take the time to program them) any time you want.

Midi is generally used as a control solution for very large, very complicated rigs where traditional pedalboard setups can be troublesome. Such rigs, more often than not, require multiple functions at every tonal change and the amount of (literal) legwork associated with a traditional pedalboard becomes overbearing and can cause the player to lose focus on playing the instrument.

Midi is also effective in smaller rigs looking to take advantage of specific pieces of gear. Let's say you buy a G Major from TC Electronic (a rackmount multieffects processor that's way better than almost all the floor units in production, and probably a bit underpriced for what you actually get). There is no effective way of controlling this thing in a live scenario without Midi. Add to it that it has relay functions for controlling a good many amps and it makes the whole thing worth it.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#4
Quote by Kendall
Midi was originally conceived as a method of simulating different sounds with keyboards/synths. There are a wide variety of messages within the Midi language, some of which have come to serve multiple purposes, and some of which have become effective in helping to control guitar rigs.


Just a little clarification
MIDI was not originally conceived as a method of simulating different sounds with keyboards/synths. It's a data protocol that enables electronic musical devices (originally keyboard/sysnths) to exchange information.
#6
I use a Midi rig already. I have a Rocktron All Access Midi controller that feeds data to an RJM RG16 Switching system. The RG16 gives me 8 switchable audio loops (for effects, etc) and controls the channels on my amp. I also use a G Major (in one of the audio loops) and a Korg Kaoss Pad (in another audio loop) which are both Midi controlled. In addition, I have 2 channels of noise reduction and an overdrive which each occupy their own audio loops in the rig.

The main reason I went to a Midi rig was to simplify a rather complicated pedalboard. The lesser reason is that I wanted to add a second effects processor (the Kaoss Pad was the first and it's sound quality is sometimes lacking). As a guitarist trying to control the Kaoss Pad without Midi, I had to build a large footswitch assembly (10 switches), and then add a bypass box. In addition I had the channel selector for the amp and a tuner. It was manageable, but just barely. When I added the overdrive I reached the breaking point. Mid song tonal changes required as many as 5 stomps, spread out over an 8 square foot radius.

Midi lets me control everything quickly and simply. If I want full on distortion with a little reverb and delay with 2 stages of noise reduction: it's only one stomp away. If I want a dry clean tone with a volume pedal and no noise reduction: it's only one stomp away. The only not-so-quick-and-simple task is setting up new presets which is still not that big of an issue.

On the downside, Midi rigs can get really expensive really fast. I have to use the All Access controller (LTD version now retailing at between $1100 and $1200) as it's custom command feature allows me to control the Kaoss Pad the way I need to. The RG16 ($600) was necessary as I needed at least 5 audio loops and some method of controlling the amp. Even getting less expensive stuff will set you back a good bit: the Rocktron Patchmate and MidiMate will put you back almost $600 for the both of them, the VoodooLab Ground Control Pro and GCX will put you back $800 for the pair. Some people won't "need" a switching system and can save a good bit of money that way, but the vast majority of guitarists actively building Midi rigs will end up needing one or buying one anyway just in case of expansion in the future. Add in your patch cables, Midi cables, rack case, power conditioner, and other miscellaneous expenses and you've got one very large dent in your savings.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#8
Dear Kendall.

Hi Kendall. Let me paint you a picture of what I going to do. I am going to buy six Hughes and Kettner "TriAmp MK2" amps and six Hughes and Kettner "CC412B30" custom cabinets. I also want to add some effects pedal. Can you do me a favor and check out www.Digitech.com and check out their new "Hardwire" pedals and tell me which pedals will enhance the sound. I'm not looking for an additional distortion pedal because I will use the distortion from the amps. Tell me if I need a Digital Delay, Chorus and such. I play Old School Hard Rock and Metal and I play rhythm guitar. I look foward in hearing from you. Could use your help. Thank you.
#9
Why, in the name of God, would anyone ever need six TriAmp's?
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#11
I don't see where more than one would be necessary unless you were on the road half the time and needed a spare.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#13
The only Digitech stuff I have any significant experience with are the Bad Monkey overdrive and the WH-4 Whammy. I don't provide input on gear I have no experience with.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#14
Quote by MrReneRamos
Dear Kendall.

Would you use a MIDI on a guitar amp and why?


Dear ReneRamos,

I answered your question in full.
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.
#15
Dear Brendan.Clace.

On the back of Hughes and Kettner's TriAmp MK2 it has an Effects Loop input. what can I install in that portion of the amp? Can I install a stompbox and activated with that guitar footswitch? The footswitch has a FX button.