#1
Need some advice guys.

So i've noticed that overall, my acoustic playing is about 10000x better than my electric playing. I am pretty frusterated because I can't think of how I can improve on the electric. I am able to play some lead parts (not that many) but for the most part when the lead is by itself it just hurts me head and doesn't sound good at all. But on my classical I love playing some lead and it sounds fine by itself.

I feel I am very limited when I write stuff on the electric because I was classically trained and when I play I make use of all the strings on my acoustic, but when I try to do that on electric, the distortion (even though I LOVE it) drowns out most of the notes or blends them together.

I don't understand the mentality behind writing some of the single note rhythms that sound very cool on the electric. For instance Crazy Train (I figure everyone would know this example) A lot of the song is single note rhythms or something close to that. And I am much more used to playing using all the strings and more chords than single notes.


tl;dr

I need to understand how to get better at writing riffs/solos on the electric.
#2
All I looked at was the tl;dr, so:

Learn scales.

Use scales that are appropriate to the music you are soloing to. Then solo.
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#3
Quote by Guitarfreak777
tl;dr

I need to understand how to get better at writing riffs/solos on the electric.

Learn more riffs/solos on the electric. It'll come naturally.
#4
feel I am very limited when I write stuff on the electric because I was classically trained and when I play I make use of all the strings on my acoustic, but when I try to do that on electric, the distortion (even though I LOVE it) drowns out most of the notes or blends them together."


You should play slowly n articulately and work your way up. Its the only to stop distortion from drowning out the notes.
#6
Quote by zeemonkey
feel I am very limited when I write stuff on the electric because I was classically trained and when I play I make use of all the strings on my acoustic, but when I try to do that on electric, the distortion (even though I LOVE it) drowns out most of the notes or blends them together."


You should play slowly n articulately and work your way up. Its the only to stop distortion from drowning out the notes.



But thats the exact opposite of classical playing. I've always been taught to let the notes ring, which your not supposed to do on the electric.

Also some things the distortion drowns out (like the G B E strings) but I love the distortion sound. Any ideas on what to do here?
#7
Quote by Guitarfreak777
But thats the exact opposite of classical playing. I've always been taught to let the notes ring, which your not supposed to do on the electric.

Also some things the distortion drowns out (like the G B E strings) but I love the distortion sound. Any ideas on what to do here?


Turn down your distortion, and don't let your notes ring and blend into each other, unless that's the effect you're going for. Do you have any specific riffs you've been playing that you want some advice on?
#8
It sounds like you need to work on string dampening/muffling. When playing a solo (or anything with distortion for that matter) you should be using both the picking and the fretting hand to choke off every string except for the one(s) you're playing. With chords it isn't as big of an issue because you should already be muffling unnecessary strings, but playing a solo with distortion requires a coordinated effort with both hands to make sure that only one string is sounding. If you aren't concentrating on dampening the other strings, the result will be ghostly feedback and blended notes.
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#9
"But thats the exact opposite of classical playing. I've always been taught to let the notes ring, which your not supposed to do on the electric."

not what i meant. Articulate as in clear and audible. Wether you play legato or staccato is your decision but you always want to be articulate
#10
Quote by Vecheka
It sounds like you need to work on string dampening/muffling.


+1

if you're used to playing acoustic instruments, you won't be used to cutting out the noise that distortion introduces. Don't worry, you'll get it with practice.
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#11
are you using a pick? if not its time to learn with one.

same way I need to learn to finger pick
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