#1
Let's assume I know dick about music theory. Here is what I should study:










                Anything else I should add? Thanks.
                #2
                A major aspect of learning theory "self-taught" people tend to miss out on is listening. Listen to lots of music, and try to work out exactly what techniques are used - even better, try to transcribe it.

                This is a big part of ear training - you can also get applications dedicated to the raw art of ear training, but it's better to be able to pick out notes and intervals in a piece of music rather than just the tones.
                #4
                Quote by Ultima2876
                A major aspect of learning theory "self-taught" people tend to miss out on is listening. Listen to lots of music, and try to work out exactly what techniques are used - even better, try to transcribe it.

                This is a big part of ear training - you can also get applications dedicated to the raw art of ear training, but it's better to be able to pick out notes and intervals in a piece of music rather than just the tones.


                I couldn't agree more. I self-taught myself theory for years, now I am in a theory class. Being able to tell what a certain type of scale is by ear is very important. When i listen to music, I try to practice conducting, figuring out time signatures, trying to figure out what key it's in, pretty much i try to find out as much as i can about it by just listening. I had no idea the importance of ear training until i started this class.
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                #5
                This is my thing also. I don't learn theory unless I tend to use it. (I'm not buying a book on how to build cars if i'm not going to build 1)

                Although now I do explore for new theory, cause I pretty much have all the theory down to understand my favourite artists, and only creativity and chops stand between me and them.

                Theory within theory is where the fun begins. "breaking" the rules as I call it or u can call it "Creativity"

                I suggest a same thing; First get down the theory of ur favourite guitarist. At the same time get the chops down. Then you can start by going out of theory and finding new ways.

                Have fun

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                #6
                In my opinion theory is like a map. I rarely use theory when writing a song...but usually when i start to develop a melodic idea i start to notice that it follows a pattern. And if i know that pattern or learn that pattern...it helps me to know where i am or where im going and finish the song. The other thing theory is good for of course is dissecting pieces of music...
                Of course...i guess a third thing theory is good for is so you can have a big music vocabulary and run around acting like a music snob heh