#1
The title pretty much explains it. What is the tone on a guitar and amp? why two of them? Maybe that's why my guitar don't sound right. I was needing various input
#2
Well u have 2 kinds of tone.

You have the tone from the amp, which is the overall sound. And the one in ur fingers, which establish how u do a vibrato, how u sound, how u fret the note, and how u pick, dynamics etc.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 17, 2008,
#3
Basically, there's your gear then there's you. Your gear depends on how much money you make, you depend on how much you practice.
#4
I don't really understand what you're asking. Tone refers to timbre, which is determined by your equipment (principally your amplifier) and, to an almost insignificant extent, your "fingers". If you're looking to improve your tone, upgrading your amp is your best bet.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Quote by Archeo Avis
I don't really understand what you're asking. Tone refers to timbre, which is determined by your equipment (principally your amplifier) and, to an almost insignificant extent, your "fingers". If you're looking to improve your tone, upgrading your amp is your best bet.


I dont' agree to insignificant extent of the fingers. There's definately some quality there. I hear people with 6000 dollar guitars and big stacks sounding more shit then For instance Lukather on a practice amp in a hotel somewhere.

There are sweet spots on the guitar, and although u can't directly define em, the nuances are there. I hear people playing perfect Stevie ray vaughan covers on exactly the same gear, same notes, same phrasing. But it misses that touch. This could lie in how u dynamically pick the notes, or even in the little slop in ur playing. If this wouldn't lie in the fingers, then a computer (for example a robotic arm with a pick attached to it) playing tru the same setup as for instance Steve Vai would sound exactly the same.

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#6
Quote by xxdarrenxx
I dont' agree to insignificant extent of the fingers. There's definately some quality there. I hear people with 6000 dollar guitars and big stacks sounding more shit then For instance Lukather on a practice amp in a hotel somewhere.

There are sweet spots on the guitar, and although u can't directly define em, the nuances are there. I hear people playing perfect Stevie ray vaughan covers on exactly the same gear, same notes, same phrasing. But it misses that touch. This could lie in how u dynamically pick the notes, or even in the little slop in ur playing. If this wouldn't lie in the fingers, then a computer (for example a robotic arm with a pick attached to it) playing tru the same setup as for instance Steve Vai would sound exactly the same.


Different players sound different because they articulate the notes differently. This has nothing to do with tone. The player certainly does contribute, to a marginal extent, to the tone coming out of the speakers, in that things like pick attack and the precise location on the string you are striking, but these factors are insignificant compared to the gear that the individual is playing through.

Tone is in the equipment.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
Different players sound different because they articulate the notes differently. This has nothing to do with tone. The player certainly does contribute, to a marginal extent, to the tone coming out of the speakers, in that things like pick attack and the precise location on the string you are striking, but these factors are insignificant compared to the gear that the individual is playing through.

Tone is in the equipment.


Yes it depends of course what u see as tone. I see that as a "tone" too. But I understand what u mean. I know it's called timbre. But alot of people use the word tone for that informally.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 17, 2008,
#8
If you mean timbre then the way you play and attack the strings does make a difference, and considerably more than many think.

If you're looking to improve your tone, I'd say practice.


Of course I'm talking about clean tone; when it comes to distortion, overdrive, your gear becomes more important than it was.
#9
Never underestimate your fingers....

The best compliment about my playing was when I gatecrashed my drummers practice session with his other band. One of the guitar players had a really nice LP copy and a marshall halfstack and wanted a break, so i had a go on it. We had a good 5 min jam of voodoo child and when we were finished the guy came rushing up saying "how did you get that sound man, that was really cool - I've been looking for that sound" and starts scrutinising the amp settings etc

I hadn't touched a single setting + I was even using his pick

It's all about dynamics, attack, where abouts you pick the note (closer to the bridge or closer to the 12th fret), your vibrato, what type of pick or your fngers and attitude etc

I always had crap amps when I started out, maybe I ended up focusing more on my playing......
EPILPSTDYamahaRBX100BassTanglewoodTW28/STRFenderchamp600CubaseStudio5Saffirepro40AlesisM1ActiveMKIIMAudioKeystation88RodeNT1AShureSM57KeeleyModTS9MackieMCUwww.myspace.com/cuthbertgriswald
Last edited by cuthbertg at Nov 17, 2008,
#10
No, I think what Xaxu is really asking is: Why is there a tone knob on his guitar and another one on his amplifier. What is their function and why couldn't we do with just the one?

I didn't know (and I'm still not sure) but I looked it up.

Here's a video with some old farth who explains it kind of by accident:
http://www.expertvillage.com/video/46133_acoustic-amp-tone-control.htm

If I understand this correctly, a tone knob is like a single equaliser slider for a wide portion of the frequency range. In the video, there seems to be one for bass and one for treble.

So I guess you can filter your sound in several stages (on the guitar, on a pedal, on the amp, ...) before it gets amplified to your speakers. And the designer of the tone control decides what portion of the sound is worked on. Chances are that the range of the tone knob on your guitar is different than the one on your amp.

It that it? Am I close?
#11
Basically your tone knob on your guitar rolls of the treble response. If you roll it right off the tone will be more mellow and less 'jaggy'. I believe some blues guys like Clapton etc refer to it as 'woman tone'.
About the whole tone in the fingers business...there is absolutely no doubt your fingers and touch affect the tone. Everyone uses varying pressure in their fingers, different pick attack, picking at a different area above the p'ups. If anyone is interested in seeing about how to vary tone using your fingers check some clips of one of Eric Johnsons instructionals on youtube. He talks about using the fleshy part of the finger to get one sound and the tip to get another and demonstrates it and yes you can hear the difference. Technically I suppose its not exactly varying the tone since you are not equalising it with your fingers etc as such. But in laymans terms the 'tone' coming out the amp will differ with each player. There is a video(audio with a picture)on youtube of Paul Gilbert and Shawn Lane passing a guitar between each other and playing and you can hear the difference in tone on that also. Gilbert still has the razor sharp playing, Lane still sounds very fluid and legato like even when picking. Anyway I have totally veered away from the original question...
Andy