#1
I have a question regarding intervals/scales. Perhaps I’m being a dumbass but hopefully you guys can help.

I’m learning the major scales at the moment, and the value of playing ‘in position’ as opposed to just up and down one string. My only problem is I can’t always work out where the next note is on the next string down.

I’ll explain; If I’m in fifth position and I want to play the A Major scale, I start on the 5th fret for the A, then to the 7th fret for B, but then how do I know for absolute certain where the C# is when I move down to the fifth string? I know the WWHWWWH recipe but I don’t know exactly where to go when I move down one string.

I hope you can understand this cos It’s been kind of hard to put into words (as you can see, ha!).

Sub question; If I’m In fifth position does that mean I should never move below the fifth fret when playing a scale? Should I only be covering four frets with four fingers ie 5,6,7 and 8?

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Quote by zimmzimmer
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#2
It is hard to explain because it sounds like you are just playing in 'box' positions, and while box positions are handy to know for fast improvising they shouldn't be the basis of your learning of scales. You say you know the wwhwwwh method good, now start on the first note of your scale (A) and count up the notes: A B C# D E F# G#, then find them on the fretboard, there are a lot of different 'positions' try not to get bogged down in the standard ones, play the notes where you want to. For example no one says you have to play 2 notes or 3 notes per string (it may work out this way because it is too much to stretch) but play around with it and see what you like, as long as you know the notes you can't really go wrong.

Edit: I think the above answers the question at the end too but just to be sure, no you definately are allowed to play below above the 5th fret or whatever fret you start on (root)
#3
use guitar pro, or maybe a tuner which tells you the note
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#5
learn the notes on the fretboard
c# on the 5th string is 4th fret.

thats how you are absolutely certain where a note is.
#7
Quote by ginjaninja
learn the notes on the fretboard
c# on the 5th string is 4th fret.

thats how you are absolutely certain where a note is.



I see what you're saying, and I know that learning the notes is the only way to absolutely be sure. I just wondered if there was a remedy or 'trick' to it
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Quote by zimmzimmer
Maybe your Dads pissed because hes shooting blanks :P
#8
Quote by mattiwillohouse
I see what you're saying, and I know that learning the notes is the only way to absolutely be sure. I just wondered if there was a remedy or 'trick' to it

well, this isn't s much a trick, but you can learn where the notes are without any sharps or flats, and then you know that if you want to make it a sharp not then you just move one fret up and if you wanna make it flat then just move on fret down, for example, you know that C on the fifth string is on the 3rd fret, then to make it C# just move it up to the 4th fret, also try to learn where all the different notes by octaves and where they are in relation to each other in the fretboard, for example to find the same note, a different octave, on th string below you just go up five frets (C on the 5th string is 3rd fret, 8th on the 6th string) and how they relate down a string and so forth, this is where learning the 'shapes' of chords and scales comes in handy
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#9
Knowing the notes on the fretboard is the way to go. I mean, playing an A Major scale in that position (2nd Finger on the 6th String) has a certain pattern to it that you can easily memorize (this may be the trick you're referencing), but when you start getting more advanced you'll want to learn notes.

Find reference points. For instance, by this time I know the 3rd fret on the 5th string is C, as well as the 5th fret being D. The 12 fret is always the same as the open string, and the 7th fret (besides the B string) is the same as the string below it (7th fret A string = an E note).

Until you learn every note itself, which will come with time, reference points can help you to think your way through the process and, let's face it, will help you learn the notes a lot faster.
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#10
Quote by Jastul
well, this isn't s much a trick, but you can learn where the notes are without any sharps or flats, and then you know that if you want to make it a sharp not then you just move one fret up and if you wanna make it flat then just move on fret down, for example, you know that C on the fifth string is on the 3rd fret, then to make it C# just move it up to the 4th fret, also try to learn where all the different notes by octaves and where they are in relation to each other in the fretboard, for example to find the same note, a different octave, on th string below you just go up five frets (C on the 5th string is 3rd fret, 8th on the 6th string) and how they relate down a string and so forth, this is where learning the 'shapes' of chords and scales comes in handy



thanks, and thanks to everyone who's pitched in (pun very much intended)

:0D
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Quote by zimmzimmer
Maybe your Dads pissed because hes shooting blanks :P
#11
Quote by mattiwillohouse
thanks, and thanks to everyone who's pitched in (pun very much intended)

:0D


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